A Pink Floyd fanatic's dream

So here it is. The Early Years box set - 27 discs in all, 12 hours of audio, 14 of video, five 7" singles, memorabilia etc. Tons of unreleased stuff. Expensive, but I've ordered it.

Pink Floyd will release The Early Years 1965-1972 on Friday 11th November 2016. A comprehensive 27-disc boxed set, it pulls together material from the Pink Floyd archive, as well as licensed Radio and TV recordings, to comprise a deluxe package that includes seven individual book-style volumes, (six of which are dedicated to particular years), featuring much previously unreleased material, as well as bonus content, reproduction memorabilia, and the band's first recording from 1965, released on CD for the first time. The packages contain more than 100 photographs of Pink Floyd, the majority of which are previously unseen, as well as more than 40 items of memorabilia in special wallets. In addition, Pink Floyd's first five UK singles have been included in the box, on 7" vinyl with replica sleeves.

The Early Years 1965-1972 box set contains unreleased tracks, BBC Radio Sessions, remixes, outtakes and alternative versions. Ten CDs, nine DVDs and eight Blu-ray discs contain more than 130 audio tracks, as well as more than 14 hours of audio-visual material. There are more than 20 unreleased songs, plus previously unreleased live audio, rare concert footage, feature films and new sound mixes. Previously unreleased tracks include 1967's Vegetable Man and In The Beechwoods, both mixed especially for this release.

The six individual year-specific book-style packages will be released separately early in 2017, although the bonus volume, CONTINU/ATION, will be exclusive to the box set, as will the larger memorabilia items, which are reproduced in actual size for the box. Also released on Friday 11th November 2016 will be a companion edition, Cre/ation – The Early Years 1967-1972, a 2-CD collection of some of the highlights of the box set, focussing on the band's material from 1967 to 1972. 2-CD track listing is here.

For further information, please see the Press Release and Full Track Listing.

Original Post

I'm always intrigued by the concept of "rare footage". By definition all footage is "rare" when it is first shot. Once it is reproduced in countless copies, as is the goal here, it is surely no-longer "rare".

Sidebar: In these days of increasingly digital video will the terms "filmmaking" and "footage" continue to have generic meaning whereby they are commonly applied to processes where no film is involved at all? If so, why?

Stevee_S posted:

Its surprising that this early collection had not been released before... 

Stevee, a lot of it is to do with the Floyd's internal politics as well as their obsession with pristine sound. From what I have been told, the sound and video quality in this collection is for the most part stunning; and they have been buying up film clips since the mid-80s and have been restoring audio and video for more than two decades. Nick Mason (and to a lesser extent Gilmour) have big archives of material.

I'm glad, after 30 years of endlessly repackaging existing material, they are actually giving fans what they crave. Without marbles and scarves too!

Kevin-W posted:
Stevee_S posted:

Its surprising that this early collection had not been released before... 

Stevee, a lot of it is to do with the Floyd's internal politics as well as their obsession with pristine sound. From what I have been told, the sound and video quality in this collection is for the most part stunning; and they have been buying up film clips since the mid-80s and have been restoring audio and video for more than two decades. Nick Mason (and to a lesser extent Gilmour) have big archives of material.

I'm glad, after 30 years of endlessly repackaging existing material, they are actually giving fans what they crave. Without marbles and scarves too!

Thanks for the insight Kevin, knowing that background it all makes a bit more sense as to the timing. I hope and I'm sure you will savour it when it arrives but at $700 its too rich for my blood. I guess they may release a CD only box set at some stage or perhaps individual CDs which might make it more available to the great unwashed... 

winkyincanada posted:

I'm always intrigued by the concept of "rare footage". By definition all footage is "rare" when it is first shot. Once it is reproduced in countless copies, as is the goal here, it is surely no-longer "rare".

Sidebar: In these days of increasingly digital video will the terms "filmmaking" and "footage" continue to have generic meaning whereby they are commonly applied to processes where no film is involved at all? If so, why?

What?????

And here was me thinking "I just need a copy of Zabriskie Point to complete my PF holdings"

Even The Beatles (same label) have never been so audacious with pricing. The latest regurgitation of their entire catalog was half the cost of this PF offering. Maybe The Beatles nickel and dime you to death while Pink Floyd is simply grabbing at your wallet upfront?

Tony2011 posted:

All for $700,00.

Just buy a copy of Relics. It covers more or less the same period.

 I also refuse to feed their silly money making machine. 

 

No it's $550 or less .

And although Relics is great, it's hardly a replacement for this, is it?

I'm quite happy to give boracic Rog, struggling Dave and skint Nick my cash if they give me some good stuff, which, judging by the tracklist, they most certainly have.

joerand posted:

Even The Beatles (same label) have never been so audacious with pricing. The latest regurgitation of their entire catalog was half the cost of this PF offering.

Not quite twice the price - about £90 difference between the Beatles Mono vinyl and this set. And the Floyd is twice as long, so while it is expensive, it's not quite as bad value as it's being painted.

The Roger Waters "super deluxe" Wall Live box - £500+. Now that was audacious pricing. Even I didn't stump up for that one.

I have ordered the 'early years' even though I have always thought they didn't get good until '73. Also have Roger's SDE Wall live box set, which was a similar price, but I am obsessed. Purely in terms of number  of discs the 'early years' set seems far better vfm. 

Kevin-W posted:
Tony2011 posted:

All for $700,00.

Just buy a copy of Relics. It covers more or less the same period.

 I also refuse to feed their silly money making machine. 

 

No it's $550 or less .

And although Relics is great, it's hardly a replacement for this, is it?

I'm quite happy to give boracic Rog, struggling Dave and skint Nick my cash if they give me some good stuff, which, judging by the tracklist, they most certainly have.

No worries, Kev. But I think every box set should come with a personal note from members of the band:

"Thank you for your contribution: it's getting harder and harder insuring my £30 million pounds 250GTO and every penny is much appreciated".

 

Kevin-W posted:

So here it is. The Early Years box set - 27 discs in all, 12 hours of audio, 14 of video, five 7" singles, memorabilia etc. Tons of unreleased stuff. Expensive, but I've ordered it.

Pink Floyd will release The Early Years 1965-1972 on Friday 11th November 2016. A comprehensive 27-disc boxed set, it pulls together material from the Pink Floyd archive, as well as licensed Radio and TV recordings, to comprise a deluxe package that includes seven individual book-style volumes, (six of which are dedicated to particular years), featuring much previously unreleased material, as well as bonus content, reproduction memorabilia, and the band's first recording from 1965, released on CD for the first time. The packages contain more than 100 photographs of Pink Floyd, the majority of which are previously unseen, as well as more than 40 items of memorabilia in special wallets. In addition, Pink Floyd's first five UK singles have been included in the box, on 7" vinyl with replica sleeves.

The Early Years 1965-1972 box set contains unreleased tracks, BBC Radio Sessions, remixes, outtakes and alternative versions. Ten CDs, nine DVDs and eight Blu-ray discs contain more than 130 audio tracks, as well as more than 14 hours of audio-visual material. There are more than 20 unreleased songs, plus previously unreleased live audio, rare concert footage, feature films and new sound mixes. Previously unreleased tracks include 1967's Vegetable Man and In The Beechwoods, both mixed especially for this release.

The six individual year-specific book-style packages will be released separately early in 2017, although the bonus volume, CONTINU/ATION, will be exclusive to the box set, as will the larger memorabilia items, which are reproduced in actual size for the box. Also released on Friday 11th November 2016 will be a companion edition, Cre/ation – The Early Years 1967-1972, a 2-CD collection of some of the highlights of the box set, focussing on the band's material from 1967 to 1972. 2-CD track listing is here.

For further information, please see the Press Release and Full Track Listing.

Looking forward for your review

Bart posted:
Tony2011 posted:

All for $700,00.

Just buy a copy of Relics. It covers more or less the same period.

 I also refuse to feed their silly money making machine. 

 

Ha ha charade you are.

 

You could at least have chosen a song from the box set period 65-72 not 1977. 

And the good news keeps on coming. I got a press release from the V&A yesterday:

Pink Floyd, London’s V&A Announce The Pink Floyd Exhibition: Their Mortal Remains

13 May – 1 October 2017
Tickets on sale 31 August 2016
Sound Experience by Sennheiser
www.pinkfloydexhibition.com | vam.ac.uk/PinkFloyd | #TheirMortalRemains

London’s Victoria and Albert Museum today announced the first major international retrospective of Pink Floyd, one of the world’s most pioneering and influential bands. To mark 50 years since the band released their first single Arnold Layne, and over 200 million record sales later, The Pink Floyd Exhibition: Their Mortal Remains will be an immersive, multi-sensory and theatrical journey through Pink Floyd’s extraordinary world. A story of sound, design and performance, the exhibition will chronicle the music, iconic visuals and staging of the band, from the underground psychedelic scene in 1960s London to the present day, illustrating their groundbreaking use of special effects, sonic experimentation, powerful imagery and social commentary. The exhibition marks the first collaboration in decades of Pink Floyd’s remaining members and is promoted by Michael Cohl and Iconic Entertainment Studios. Tickets go on sale at 10:0am, Wednesday 31 August via the V&A and other ticketing partners.

The exhibition will celebrate Pink Floyd’s place in history as the cultural landscape changed throughout the 1960s and beyond. Pink Floyd occupied a distinctive experimental space and were the foremost exponents of a psychedelic movement that changed the understanding of music forever. They became one of the most important groups in contemporary music.

Pink Floyd have produced some of the most iconic imagery in popular culture: from pigs flying over Battersea Power Station, The Dark Side of the Moon prism, cows, marching hammers to giant inflatable teachers; their vision brought to life by creative individuals such as modern surrealist and long-time collaborator Storm Thorgerson, satirical illustrator Gerald Scarfe and psychedelic lighting pioneer Peter Wynne-Wilson.

The Pink Floyd Exhibition: Their Mortal Remains, with sonic experience by Sennheiser, will celebrate the band’s era-defining work in composition, staging, design, film, music technology, graphic design and photography. It will feature more than 350 objects and artefacts including never-before-seen material, presented alongside works from the V&A’s outstanding collections of art, design, architecture and performance. Highlights will include spectacular set and construction pieces from some of Pink Floyd’s most innovative and legendary album covers and stage performances including The Dark Side of the Moon, The Wall and The Division Bell, instruments, music technology, original designs, architectural drawings, handwritten lyrics and psychedelic prints and posters.

At the exhibition, visitors will have the unique opportunity to experience never-before-seen classic Pink Floyd concert footage and a cust0m-designed laser light show.

Martin Roth, Director of the V&A said: “The V&A is perfectly placed to exhibit the work of a band that is as recognisable for its unique visual imagery as for its music. Pink Floyd is an impressive and enduring British design story of creative success. Alongside creating extraordinary music, they have for over five decades been pioneers in uniting sound and vision, from their earliest 1960s performances with experimental light shows, through their spectacular stadium rock shows, to their consistently iconic album covers. The exhibition will locate them within the history of performance, design and musical production by presenting and complementing the material from Pink Floyd’s own archive with the V&A’s unrivalled collections in architecture, design, graphics and literature.”

Michael Cohl of Iconic Entertainment Studios said: “We are proud to have been chosen as the promoter of what will be an incredible exhibition at the V&A. I have always loved being involved with Pink Floyd and the work that goes into making a visual spectacular. This is the culmination of a long history together and I’m happy to work once again with one of the greatest bands of all time.”

The exhibition is curated by the V&A by a team led by Victoria Broackes alongside Aubrey ‘Po’ Powell of Hipgnosis, the Creative Director of Pink Floyd, and Paula Stainton. The curatorial team have worked closely with members of the group on the content of the exhibition, which is being designed by Stufish, the world leading entertainment architects and longtime stage designers for Pink Floyd.

The Pink Floyd Exhibition: Their Mortal Remains opens on 13 May 2017 for 20 weeks.

 

 

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