Any Beatles fans here?

Despite their often alleged greatness, I never listen to them or buy their albums, and can't think of anyone else I know who does either. There are lots of other great bands of their era who I think have stood the test of time far better, and who seem to be much more widely played in my experience - not least their bad-boy rivals, the Rolling Stones.

The Beatles were the greatest band of a generation, changing the way music was written and recorded. 

1967 with the release of the St Pepper album was pivotal, it changed the face of popular music.

Their was an excellent documentary on the BBC, on this very subject, made because it is the fiftieth anniversary of the album

I am lucky enough to have seen them a few times,  First time was in '63 when they were a support act on a tour headed up by Roy Orbison (the then girlfriends heart throb) .  Then again (new girlfriend in tow) 6 months later when they had swapped with RO to be top of the bill.     After that I saw them a few more times, Leeds & Glasgow & my last was NME at Wembley in '66,  it was mayhem with the audience noise & after that I gave up;  and as it happens, so did the Beatles, no more touring.   Sgt. Pepper is one of my regular go to albums, (still waiting for a 24-bit release)   after that my favourite albums are, the 'White' album & Abbey Road.

Oddly enough, I picked up the 1 compilation in a charity shop at the weekend for £1, and listened to the rip earlier inthe week. It's interesting to hear the catchy pure pop of the earlier hits turn into more sophisticated and complex music, I really enjoyed it, thought the songs still held up well, and Macca couldn't half write a tune. I still listen  to the albums, Abbey Road is a regular go-to, I'd class myself as a fan. (And I'm very jealous of Mike-B.)

Dozey posted:

Yes, but I haven't played their stuff much in recent years due to over exposure during the 60's and 70's. 

After their heyday I stopped playing them, after all I could probably scat (very badly I'd add) every note since Hard Days Night. But from the 90s I've regularly come back to them (Help! and onwards, skipping Let It Be) and appreciate the music even more, especially with the inherent nostalgia factor of being reduced to my teens again.

The 24/96 Sgt. Pepper remix is awesome, and I play the orchestral side of Yellow Submarine as much as any of them (perhaps I shouldn't have admitted that...)

Gary - 24/96 Sgt. Pepper remix ???  where can you get that,  all the usual sites on have 16 bit.  Did you get it from the DVD/BR 5.1.      I 'borrowed' a 16-bit copy of the 2017 release & agree its a step up from the 2009 remaster.  I'll live with that,  but will be still be  waiting for a 24-bit to become available - methinks the record co have missed a trick with this.  

Eoink - re (And I'm very jealous of Mike-B.),  you would for sure be jealous if you knew the other bands I watched during the '60's   The list is endless - favourite venues (mostly London & HC's)  were The Marquee, Eel Pie Island, Klooks Kleek, Troubadour & Middle Earth ...............  at least one gig a week,  some weeks it was a gig a nite.  (thats not the latest ethernet stnd)  

Mike-B posted:

Gary - 24/96 Sgt. Pepper remix ???  where can you get that,  all the usual sites on have 16 bit.  Did you get it from the DVD/BR 5.1.      I 'borrowed' a 16-bit copy of the 2017 release & agree its a step up from the 2009 remaster.  I'll live with that,  but will be still be  waiting for a 24-bit to become available - methinks the record co have missed a trick with this.  

Eoink - re (And I'm very jealous of Mike-B.),  you would for sure be jealous if you knew the other bands I watched during the '60's   The list is endless - favourite venues (mostly London & HC's)  were The Marquee, Eel Pie Island, Klooks Kleek, Troubadour & Middle Earth ...............  at least one gig a week,  some weeks it was a gig a nite.  (thats not the latest ethernet stnd)  

IIRC, the 24 bit albums were issued on the Apple-shaped USB stick.

I was a regular at Eel Pie, mostly on Sunday night for some reason. All sorts of folk got over there, it was a veritable who's who of sixties pop & rock stars. A penny to the little old lady to get across the bridge, stamp on your arm to show you'd paid. Happy days!

Ok, here's the thing. The Beatles are the beginning, middle and end of the top division of music - everyone (even The mighty Fall) comes somewhere lower down and I'll let you argue amongst yourselves about your priorities there. This is irrefutable. As the late great John Peel said (though in a slightly different context) - you may dispute this, but I'm right and you're wrong.

I am beyond insanely jealous of anyone who saw them, being a relative youngster myself, but happily the albums largely stand the test of time. Hear Revolver and you might as well not bother to listen to indie guitar bands of the 90s again (although, of course, I do). Abbey Road is a regular go-to, almost always to be heard in one go. I've Got A Feeling on Let It Be is worth coming back to. Why Apple don't make a mint from releasing the complete rooftop concert is beyond me.

Current Desert Island Discs track - "Baby You're A Rich Man".

nickpeacock posted:

Ok, here's the thing. The Beatles are the beginning, middle and end of the top division of music - everyone (even The mighty Fall) comes somewhere lower down and I'll let you argue amongst yourselves about your priorities there. This is irrefutable. As the late great John Peel said (though in a slightly different context) - you may dispute this, but I'm right and you're wrong.

<snip>

Without JSB. the Beatles could never have been.

Your statement is refuted.

Mike-B posted:

Gary - 24/96 Sgt. Pepper remix ???  where can you get that,  all the usual sites on have 16 bit.  Did you get it from the DVD/BR 5.1.      I 'borrowed' a 16-bit copy of the 2017 release & agree its a step up from the 2009 remaster.  I'll live with that,  but will be still be  waiting for a 24-bit to become available - methinks the record co have missed a trick with this.  

 

Yes, I ripped the Blu-Ray audio from the 50th set.

OK band AFAIC, they didn't make a huge impact on my life. We were listening to blues and other import and then  Ska and Who.  Beatles made some good albums, bat there was a massive amount of hype surrounding their achievements. Any one interested can find many of the so called firsts were available in studio work of others. It may be that SPLHCB might be the first commercial album to use many of these techniques.

Even John Lennon stole the idea of his hat from someone else. 

Beatle suits were original but who would want to look like that? 

The Beatles music, changed the way pop music was written and played. 

It's transcended all other music genres, despite virtually no media hype, limited TV, no smart phones, no YouTube ect ect ect

What they achieved is truly remarkable regardless if you like their music or not.

The cavern club in Liverpool  is famous to this day, with people still visiting every day. How many venues do tourists visit based on the fact a pop band played their in the sixties? 

it's the Beatles that put Liverpool on the map....

Their achievements are truly remarkable 

In 2011 I was outside Penn Station/Madison Square Garden, and all over NYC were seen the likes of this:

Name another band that would get such treatment a full 41 years after they last ever recorded together.

Like them or not, they changed pop/rock music in a way no one else has...that's why every pretender is dubbed "the next Beatles".

I have to take issue with whoever it was said that the White Album should have been reduced to a single album. IMHO it is probably their finest work - and by that I mean when taken as a whole. Even Revolution 9 is an essential part. Difficult to listen to, maybe, but still part of the whole experience.

I don't play them much now, but each album has special memories for me even though I didn't really get into them until the late '70s. 

We are all in a better place thanks to the Beatles.

 

 

 

(IMHO)

The Beatles were creative, progressive, artistic, and techno-savvy in the studio, but beyond all that had an ability to generate basic pop hooks, run with them, and efficiently smith a multitude of songs in various genres that people want to hear over and over. In their time, through succeeding generations, and still today there is a genuine, fresh energy to appreciate in their sound.

If you don't get that, fine. The Beatles didn't reach you. I'm simply happy I "get it". They work for me. Based on record sales, millions and by some accounts billions of others "get it" and The Beatles' music will presist and remians valuable today in every sense of the word. Peace out.

For me, fwiw, growing up in the '60s, their earlier pop records (please please me, help, etc.) were good, but by no means the be-all and end-all.  There were so many good bands producing great records (and rubbish bands producing rubbish), so many different genres that I wouldn't have said at the time that they were the best or outstanding (though there were those that did - and those that said the Stones , Kinks, Beach Boys... were the best).  There were many outstanding records at the time - Wheels of Fire, I Bring You Fire and others.  And of course Pink Floyd...  Then came Sgt Pepper's - that was a game changer.  There were still plenty of other great records and groups, but Sgt Pepper really was a significant shift.  And they kept producing great records (and some not-so-great).  But there were plenty of other hugely innovative and influential groups.  So for me, yes, the Beatles were one of the most influential groups, but not the most, or the only.

Bananahead posted:

Would The Beatles be as successful or popular if they arrived now or were they simply a product of their time?

I don't think anyone doubts The Beatles were a magical aligning of the planets in their time and space. To their credit, they seized the moment and worked incredibly hard at their craft, never resting on their laurels. What can get lost in the collective talents of McCartney, Lennon and Harrison residing in the same group is just how industrious the band was, especially during the first five years of their success which included limited time in the studio due to extensive touring. Have any other pop bands put out 12 successful studio albums in an eight-year period?

Of course The Beatles' popularity would differ if they arrived now. Same can be said for Chuck Berry, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, the mainstream Fleetwood Mac, Nirvana or whoever, so it seems a rather moot point of discussion.

Anyone who has seen 'Sgt peppers musical revolution' (BBC4) knows just how unique this music is. My skybox has died, and the programme with it. I have to get it back!!!

I have the 24 bit reissues from some years back, and they are a significant improvement on the earlier CD remasters, but hearing the Tidal rendering (16 bit) of the new Sgt. Pepper recording has  really whetted the appetite for a 24 bit version. 

Do I really have to spend a further £100+ to get one 24 bit Blu Ray album, and then tear my hair (what's left) trying to rip a 24 bit version? Give us a break, Apple.

They were part of the soundtrack to my school years when they were never off my Dansette (my brothers really) but funnily I have never been able to listen to their albums much.

Think the last time I played a Beatles album all the way through was Let it Be back when it came out.

My fav album of theirs is Revolver.

One of my favourite experiences of live music (and I've seen a lot) was seeing a Japanese Beatles covers band at The Cavern in Liverpool as part of the Mathew Street festival about 5 or 6 years ago.

It was about midnight, everyone in the crowd had been on the sauce all day, and had been to the club plenty of times before.

The joy, the obvious sense of a pilgrimage achieved (don't mention anything about it not being the original Cavern!) on the band's faces infected the room and it was brilliant.

I wasn't even born until a decade after Sgt. Pepper came out, and I still think it's one of the best albums I own.

Reading these responses another factor of The Beatles' creative prowess comes to mind for me; how many bands are given complete artistic license in the studio? This was essentially the case for The Beatles from "Rubber Soul" on. Budget of no factor due to presumed success of the output. Every album The Beatles produced sold in hoards and really no lemons in the discography. I doubt the bean counters ever had their fingers crossed when a new Beatles album went out.

joerand posted:

Reading these responses another factor of The Beatles' creative prowess comes to mind for me; how many bands are given complete artistic license in the studio? This was essentially the case for The Beatles from "Rubber Soul" on. Budget of no factor due to presumed success of the output. Every album The Beatles produced sold in hoards and really no lemons in the discography. I doubt the bean counters ever had their fingers crossed when a new Beatles album went out.

Agree with the above, plus the later music, was so complex, they would not have been able to play it  live.

 

I was born in 1970. My parents had the red and blue compilation albums and I played them to death. When I passed my A levels (in 1988) with good grades my parents bought me a much craved complete Beatles vinyl box set. I much preferred the later (Revolver onwards) albums. Since I've bought my Naim system, I bought the hi res USB Apple and I've really grown to appreciate and love the early stuff too.

I honestly can't choose a favourite album as they are all great in their own way. Quite unique and so influential. 

Yeah, they were my best friends once Revolver and then Sgt Pepper came out. Getting to the basement on a Saturday afternoon and they'd take me on a fun fantasy filled trip.  No smoking back then at 14 with a lawyer for father.

I did give them up for a  long time with no albums untill my first Naim in 2000 and soon they reissued the white album in CD format. I still have the urge to get up at the end of each of the album sides even on CD.  I know 2nd album isn't played that much but dayam, they had some great songs and Beatle blues with John and Harrison.  Very creative.  The way I look at #9 is this is John on acid and I still listen to it.  I only bought the last few mono recordings Rubber Soul on.

Mark,

how I wish you hadn't started this. Please forget you did, put Across the Universe on the DVD player and wonder when someone will do a film like that using the Stones, Aerosmith or U2 or Coldplay or whoever the f*** you want. Can we please not talk of The B. anymore, so that the only good thing my generation had is not spoiled by rationality, revisionism or by some amateurs explaining that George Harrison was a worst guitar player than Steve Vai? Can we, please, keep our greatest love for ourselves?

Thanks,

with affection

Max

 

Max_B posted:

Mark,

how I wish you hadn't started this. Please forget you did, put Across the Universe on the DVD player and wonder when someone will do a film like that using the Stones, Aerosmith or U2 or Coldplay or whoever the f*** you want. Can we please not talk of The B. anymore, so that the only good thing my generation had is not spoiled by rationality, revisionism or by some amateurs explaining that George Harrison was a worst guitar player than Steve Vai? Can we, please, keep our greatest love for ourselves?

Thanks,

with affection

Max

 

Bravo Max, well said..

ATB Graham.

They are dated, they didn't have the technology we have now.  They had to do 2 tracks, mix them to 1 and do 2 other tracks and mix those to 1 and then put those last 2 together.  Paul said they start out with the sharpest sounds, probably Ringo and background vocals first, then more melodic and vocals on top.  That is creative, plus they were putting out so many records each year AND touring.  George Martin said what he admired most was how quick they learned and bent the rules, they didn't keep repeating their music, each album was it's own deal. They got my attention and life was much more colorful and fun. 

It was a pretty amazing period with so many bands coming out but most fading away after a hit or three.  Stones were magnificent for the British Blues bad boy scene reflecting the blues back to us in the states and saying "Hey you, listen to THIS".  By 70 when Beatles broke up I was in CA at 17 but so many bands bringing influences from every corner and mashing it all up.  Besides the Blues, rock's other main influence was Country and early 70s I was in college in Colorado so that was a whole other personal adjustment I was just listening to radio. I had one last roomate with records, Introduced me to Fleetwood Mac, Pink Floyd, CSN, Poco, Flying Burrito Bros, and the first Eagles album came out. Then Bowie crashed the scene!

My grades weren't very good but the beer and music was great to expand my musical taste.

Going back to the original post - that (the website) is quite a thorough wade through the songs and reminds me of MacDonald's excellent book "Revolution in the Head" . I'll be dipping into it some more. Thanks.

As for the band - well, in seven short years they changed the world, didn't they. From "I Saw her Standing There" to "Her Majesty" and hardly a bum note in between. And thank goodness they had the sense to end when they did and to never reform.

 

 

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