Balanced Mains Transformer

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July 16, 2011 12:01 PM

I am considering buying a balanced mains unit.  Has anyone here had any experience of using them, and what effect did they have on the sound?

 
 
 
 
July 16, 2011 12:49 PM

In my system, not all Naim, the benefits are quite clear.  Lower noise floor and a cleaner, sound with dynamics unaffected. As usual best to try in your own system and see if it suits you.

 
 
 
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July 16, 2011 2:13 PM

If you're looking at an infrastructure-sized unit that requires installation by an electrician, it would be well worth it to sort out all elements of your AC mains first.

On the other hand-freestanding balanced power units are easy to try, but you do run the risk of underspecification, which might result in dynamic compression or increased mechanical noise in your room.
 
 
 
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July 16, 2011 3:51 PM

This thread should be all you need to come up with an informed decision

 

http://forums.naimaudio.com/di...ent/1566878607922730

 
 
 
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July 17, 2011 10:03 AM

Hi Ron

 

Thanks for the link.  Mind you, I did find the chap's article a bit incoherent.

 

I'm going to use a 1.5kva unit, which should be enough for the Uniti

 

Dave

 
 
 
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July 17, 2011 3:11 PM

A 1.5 kVA unit is fine. But be warned...for much less than the aquisition price of the unit, you could have your mains properly seen too (a dedicated clean feed from your circuit breaker with 8ga wires and a dedidicated earth rod) all in conventional unbalanced mode and have a large improvement. Only go with balanced power when the mains and ground are the best than can be. Balanced power is not a remedy for a crappy earth  or corroded terminals in your main circuit breaker that introduce arcing and retard noise dumping. Spend $400 or so by having a rod put in, getting a copper bus bar breaker box and wiring with beefy copper. If you like those results than consider balanced power, that will offer you more of the same.

 
 
 
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July 17, 2011 3:54 PM

+1 : any results you achieve by sorting out the mains will serve your balanced power run, especially as the ground is a fundamental point of potential in a technical power environment–possibly the most important.

 
 
 
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July 17, 2011 4:00 PM

Well, this is my concern too.  I use Tacima filtering block which, let it be said, shunts the noise down to earth.  If the CTE on the transformer is referenced to earth, then there is a distinct possibility that I'd be no better off.

 

I live in a new house (new, means it was built about five years ago), so the earthing points would have been installed in accordance with the 16th Edition of the Wiring Regulations.  I would imagine that earthing would not be too much of a problem.

 
 
 
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July 17, 2011 4:09 PM

Actually, I was wondering: do UK houses have earthing to Neutral, or do they actually have ground rods installed?  I have to confess that I don't actually know about this.

 
 
 
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July 17, 2011 4:20 PM

IME earthing is via the cold water pipe under the kitchen sink.

 
 
 
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July 17, 2011 4:24 PM

Oh!  That's strange.  I've got one of those.  Only the pipe coming into the house is plastic!

 
 
 
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George Fredrik
 
July 17, 2011 4:27 PM

The earth strap[s] to the sink or water [and gas] systems are not the earth!

 

It is to make sure that there is no potential difference between a person standing on the floor using the plumving or sink by providing a connection to the correct earthing arrangements.  A safety measure, that is only helpful assuming the correct earthing arrangements are intact..

 

ATB from George

 

 

 
 
 
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July 17, 2011 7:01 PM

There is also the possibility that the power supply in Naim equipment is of such a quality and level of design that it simply isn't necessary.

 

I live in a modern house which has modern wiring and earthing arrangements.  With the Uniti's power supply design, I am wondering now if it is worth taking the risk of spending £200 on a balanced mains unit.  I'm confused.

 

 
 
 
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George Fredrik
 
July 17, 2011 8:57 PM

Dear Ursus,

 

The house I am in was rewired in the last two months from tip to toe. A totally new instalation replacing a dangerous arrangement incorporating 1940s lead and rubber cables, and little in the way of earthing et cetera. I mentioned about a spur! The electrician's response was a classic! Why do that when the current regulations require such a degree of safety and over-engineering that a spur could not possibly offer an advantage!

 

I have to say the only time I have heard a spur dedicated to hifi make any noticeable [if still entirely insignificant] difference to the replay effect was in a building whose writing was probably tstill wired to the strandards of the 1950s at least.

 

Any modern instalation will be fine and safe in any normal circumstances to power replay equipment without the disruption and expense of a dedicated spur. My replay works on a ring that feeds the sockets in only two rooms, and nothing else is plugged into it! So it is a dedicated ring isn't it?

 

Don't bother if your wiring is modern. If so then it is already adequate. Ask my electrician! If I want tax advice, I''ll ask an proper accountant. If I want legal advice then I consult a good solicitor. If I want advice on wiring I'll ask my trusted electrician! Why would you be take note of people who know nothing about the subject and just trot out the myth of the dedicated spur, because they have read it here fifty times themselves. As Goebels noted, "Repeat something [an untruth] a hundred times and it becomes the truth."

 

ATB from George

 
 
 
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July 18, 2011 2:53 PM

From what I can tell, the Naim power supplies are 'fast'...i.e. they have just enough filter capacitance to do the job followed by LM317/337(where applicable) voltage regulators. No ultramassive capacitor banks, intercapictor resistors/inductors to add additional smoothing, but slow down the power delivery. This design approach means that they are very responsive to the signal going in and are not encumbered by their own weight. But it also means that they are also very dependant on the quality of mains going in....Naim have for decades recommended a high quality dedicated line/spur for this very reason. If you have 200 UKP to spare then please consider having a separate mains spur installed by a qualified and licensed electrician, and hook it up with the fattest gauge wire than he is comfortable with. 10mm2 seems a good place to start. I gather that in the UK, dedicated ground rods are not de facto standard, unlike here in the US.

 

The whole concept of the 'ring mains' seemed to be a throwback of the last world war, where it was necessary to implement to reduce the amount of copper in domestic installations and thereby divert it for military uses. For the very same reasons why platinum jewelry mysteriously fell out of favour and was replaced by gold....the government needed platinum to make weapons of mass destruction.

 

What you are trying to achieve with a dedicated mains is the lowest impedence to both hot and ground. This will require either shorter runs of mains cable (usually not possible) or increasing the cross section area of the individual runs. Switches in wall outlets are for convenience but only add another mechanical connection and current bottlenecking. In mains supply, less is always more.

 

Just because a mains supply conforms to current building codes (which is good enough for lights, kitchen mixers, power saws etc) doesnt mean that it is rigorous enough for the much higher demands of a high quality audio system.

 
 
 
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July 18, 2011 6:21 PM

I agree with George's assertion that a dedicated spur would make much difference.  Can I say that the ring main technique for the wiring of domestic installations in the UK has worked well since the introduction of the National Grid and the standardisation of mains voltages after the Second World War.  It is an efficient and safe means of distribution of electricity through most homes, and the entire circuit is protected with only one ´╗┐circuit breaker on the consumer unit.

 

In designing the power supplies of premium hi-fi equipment, I imagine that Naim (and for that matter, Linn, Audiolab, et al) have designed their products to work effectively in a typical domestic environment.  To do otherwise would have resulted in poor-performing hi-fi components and we all know how Naim hi-fi performs: extremely well!

 

The electrical systems of UK houses are different to those of US homes, if only because the voltage is different and that wiring and earthing standards differ.  It is worth pointing out that house wiring must conform to Part P of the Building Regulations, and failure to comply is a criminal offence which can have serious consequences for both the builder or electrician, and the householder.  I know this, because I used to work for the NICEIC.  Furthermore, switched sockets are a legal requirement.

 

I have no doubt that there is noise on the mains, because the noise floor dropped when I started using mains conditioners.  It was obvious in that the noise disappeared from the TV picture and the sound quality on my hi-fi improved noticeably.  This indicates to me that the noise is on the mains and not the earth.  The real issue for me is this: would a balanced mains transformer be any better than the filtering arrangements I have currently? I am actually beginning to have doubts.

 
 
 
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pjl2
 
July 18, 2011 6:36 PM

When we moved into our bungalow a couple of years ago we had some electrical work done as part of the renovations. I had lived without a dedicated spur for the previous 17 years, but now seemed like a golden opportunity to have one fitted without any disruption, so I did. I specified 10mm gauge cable (cooker gauge), and it is wired to its own totally seperate consumer unit, which has its own tails back to the meter. The socket is a double unswitched Crabtree in the lounge. So it really is a dedicated supply which is completely seperate to the general supply. It sounds better than the general supply - but the difference is not in the night/day league at all. I would only bother now if I had money to burn and there was absolutely no disruption involved. The standard ring mains is perfectly adequate, provided it is reasonably up-to-date - I would not even bother with an unswitched socket.

 

Peter

 
 
 
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July 18, 2011 6:48 PM

This indicates to me that the noise is on the mains and not the earth.  The real issue for me is this: would a balanced mains transformer be any better than the filtering arrangements I have currently? I am actually beginning to have doubts.

 If the noise is riding on the mains, the balanced power absolutely will get rid of it via common mode rejection. Filtering has the disadvantage of starving  transient current delivery.... a good balanced mains supply will not.

 

As I mentioned above, Naim power supplies are not entirely immune to impure mains supplies, and indeed seem a lot more sensitive to mains noise than about almost any other brand out there. I have never had any brand other than Naim have loud mains related transformer buzzing- which by the way was entirely eliminated with balanced power.

 

If you want to talk yourself out of trying balanced mains, you have lost nothing financially, but may have thrown the baby out with the bathwater sonically.

 

In one of my previous music rooms, I had FOUR different mains supplies of varying qualities (installed by two different electricians)....it was very easy to plug the gear into different sockets and hear it transform from dull and murky (standard approved 10A domestic spur) to gripping and breath-taking (100A cleanfeed with 6ga wiring and Wiremold power strips hardwired into panel). All this before I discovered balanced power.

 

You have been warned ;-)

 
 
 
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Guido Fawkes
 
July 18, 2011 7:30 PM

Originally Posted by George Fredrik:

Dear Ursus,

 

... I mentioned about a spur! The electrician's response was a classic! Why do that when the current regulations require such a degree of safety and over-engineering that a spur could not possibly offer an advantage!

 

......

 

ATB from George

Yes an unfortunate and typical answer I'm afraid. I had that when I asked for 4mm wiring and the main living room to be on a separate circuit breaker from the rest of house: I realise now I should have asked for much fatter gauge, a separate consumer unit and properly balanced mains. But yes, it was "Why do that when .." My answer was because I'm completely loopy and prepared to pay extra for something I don't need: the men in white coats only let me come home yesterday. 

 

A balanced mains supply will make a difference (not just a dedicated spur), it'll eliminate transformer hum for a start. Whether you'll enjoy the replay any more as a result is a matter of opinion. I think Ron is absolutely right in what he says and from reading his posts knows far more about it than the electrician who wired my house - probably the cheapest the house-builders could find. 

 

Lots of suppliers/tradesman will tell customers they don't need this or that: so stick to your guns, if you're paying for it George then you're entitled to get the product and service you ask for. 

 

I hear guys I work with trying to tell our customers what they want - not good in my view, I try to design systems they want as best as I can within their budget; haven't had any complaints about this approach. 

 

All the best Guy

 

PS I haven't got an accountant so I have to fill in my own tax form  

Well I don't have to any more as mine were so boring the tax office said not to bother.

 
Last edited by Guido Fawkes July 18, 2011 7:39 PM
 
 
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July 19, 2011 3:19 AM

Originally Posted by ursus262:

Hi Ron

 

Thanks for the link.  Mind you, I did find the chap's article a bit incoherent.

 

I'm going to use a 1.5kva unit, which should be enough for the Uniti

 

Dave

Dave-

You are wasting time/money if you put in balanced power before you optimize the ground to the system..

 

Marc

The incoherent one

 
 
 
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July 19, 2011 6:16 AM

Originally Posted by ursus262:

Hi Ron

 

Thanks for the link.  Mind you, I did find the chap's article a bit incoherent.

 

I'm going to use a 1.5kva unit, which should be enough for the Uniti

 

Dave

Dave, I use a cheap, no brand name 2kVA voltage stabiliser (but without filtering circuit, only a large transformer practically) and it's impact on sound quality is immense.  No need for expensive units, DO NOT use mains filtering circuits, all you need is as big as possible transformer to absorb and flatten voltage transients and current surges because Naims have rather small internal power reserves (eg Uniti's is <300VA) to do so.

 

Bobby

 
 
 
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July 19, 2011 4:56 PM

I have discovered that UK houses do not have earthing rods.  They tend to be earthed through the neutral at the utility company's main fuse.  I cannot install an earth rod, because there is no way I can practically do this.

 

I have come to the conclusion that the problem is not with the earth: the problem lies with the power instead.  Earthing is not the issue.

 
 
 
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July 20, 2011 12:16 AM

<sigh> That is the problem with the UK mains and its, ahem, uniQ type of earthing...that virtually guarantees there is a very large amount of earth noise injected by every single person on that mains feed....I am guessing 30 to 100 households...each of which may be using hairdryers, dishwashers, refrigerators and sundry other sources of mains pollution that can find its way back to earth, and is them summated.

 

So the problem in the UK with a single household installing a dedicated earth rod is that if there is any earthing failure at the power company, your rod them becomes the only earth for the entire neighbourhood, which it is very ill equipped to do, and poses a *very* significant risk. It probably would be safer to fill a swimming pool with mercury and run a 4 inch diameter copper busbar into it, and using that as your earth. Sounds mad as a hatter, doesn't it? Onthlam has done something similar, but on a much smaller scale, and using electrolytic slurry instead of mercury.

 
 
 
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July 20, 2011 7:48 AM

Originally Posted by Ron Toolsie:

<sigh> That is the problem with the UK mains and its, ahem, uniQ type of earthing...that virtually guarantees there is a very large amount of earth noise injected by every single person on that mains feed....I am guessing 30 to 100 households...each of which may be using hairdryers, dishwashers, refrigerators and sundry other sources of mains pollution that can find its way back to earth, and is them summated.

 

So the problem in the UK with a single household installing a dedicated earth rod is that if there is any earthing failure at the power company, your rod them becomes the only earth for the entire neighbourhood, which it is very ill equipped to do, and poses a *very* significant risk. It probably would be safer to fill a swimming pool with mercury and run a 4 inch diameter copper busbar into it, and using that as your earth. Sounds mad as a hatter, doesn't it? Onthlam has done something similar, but on a much smaller scale, and using electrolytic slurry instead of mercury.

Well, the thing is, this arrangement is intrinsically safe and at the time it was designed, sensitive electronic technology for home entertainment systems simply did not exist.

 

This common earth arrangement was a legacy of the old socialist planning that existed in the UK in the 50s and 60s and unfortunately, we are stuck with it.  The electricity company was state-owned in those days and it was through that that common standards emerged.

 
 
 
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July 20, 2011 4:48 PM

I can attest to a separate maind spur and it follows Naim's advice on the subject.

 

If balanced transformers are so good I wonder why Naim do not use them at the factory as a "reference supply" for evaluating their kit and do not appear to recommend them for home installation.

 

Are they better suited for use outside the UK where, (big supposition) perhaps the mains is less good.  I know of one UK accessories dealer (you know ho he is) who supplies balanced mains transformers but haven't found much in the way of ecstatic recommendations.

 
 
 
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July 20, 2011 4:58 PM

I have found advice in some Naim manuals about separate spurs.  I am sure, however, a balanced mains transformer will have the same effect on system performance

 
Last edited by ursus262 July 20, 2011 5:15 PM
 
 
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Guido Fawkes
 
July 20, 2011 7:29 PM

 

3kVA Balanced Power Supply 3110S  (230V to 2 x 230V)  protected with 3 pole MCBs on both the input and output to make sure no voltage remains on either the neutral or earth legs. Made in the UK by Airlink Transformers, This has passed all the UK safety standards - you plug it in to a standard wall socket and you get two balanced mains outputs. 

 

Trichord Research do one for twice the price

Russ Abbot for four times the price

 

The TR ones looks nicest. 

 

 
 
 
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July 21, 2011 4:58 AM

Originally Posted by ursus262:

I have found advice in some Naim manuals about separate spurs.  I am sure, however, a balanced mains transformer will have the same effect on system performance

 

You are sure a balanced trans would have the same (equal) effect? On what basis of fact do you suggest this? You haven't even tried one- 

Be it known that for those who have started with a sep spur and have gone onto upgrading to a bal mains trans- there is NO comparison. The trans is light-years ahead.  In every musical way.

 

MN

 

 
 
 
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July 21, 2011 5:07 AM

Originally Posted by GrahamFinch:

I can attest to a separate maind spur and it follows Naim's advice on the subject.

 

If balanced transformers are so good I wonder why Naim do not use them at the factory as a "reference supply" for evaluating their kit and do not appear to recommend them for home installation.

 

Are they better suited for use outside the UK where, (big supposition) perhaps the mains is less good.  I know of one UK accessories dealer (you know ho he is) who supplies balanced mains transformers but haven't found much in the way of ecstatic recommendations.

A/V POST/FILMARTISTSRECORDING STUDIOS
TODD A/ORAY CHARLESTHE PLANT
WARNER FOLEY STUDIOSNORAH JONESGLENWOOD PLACE
WARNER SOUND DEPT.ELTON JOHNOCEAN WAY RECORDING
SKYWALKER SOUNDNEIL YOUNGAVATAR STUDIOS
MIKE POST STUDIOSSTEVIE WONDERWONDERLAND STUDIO
SONY POST PRODUCTIONSBRITNEY SPEARSSONY RECORDING STUDIO (NYC)
SOUND SERVICES INC.EMINEMGENTLEMAN'S CLUB
 HERBIE HANCOCKNRG STUDIOS
PRODUCERS/ENGINEERSCHRISTINA AGUILERAHACIENDA STUDIOS
ROGER NICHOLSBOB DYLANHOLLYWOOD RECORDS
PHIL RAMONAEROSMITHA&M RECORDS
BRUCE SWEDIENSHERYL CROWOZ AUDIO AND POST
FRANK SERAFINEBB KINGLAWSON PRODUCTIONS
 RICKY SKAGGSWINDHAM HILL RECORDS
LIVE SOUND-THEATERHARRY CONNICK JR.MUTATO MUSIKA
UNIVERSAL AMPHITHEATERRICKY MARTIN 
PRO MIXSTEELY DANSTUDIO DESIGN/ARCHITECTS
CIRQUE DU SOLIELOZZY OSBOURNEJOHN STORYK
THE MIRAGELENNY KRAVITZCHRIS PELONIS
AUDIO ANALYSTSHOOTIE AND THE BLOWFISHCHRISTOPHER HUSTON
BENAROYA THEATERN'SYNCWESTLAKE AUDIO
THE BRITT FESTIVAL (Jacksonville, OR)PETER GABRIEL 
 WHITNEY HOUSTON 
RELIGIOUS BROADCASTJOE COCKERMANUFACTURERS
GOOD NEWS BROADCASTINGSTYXDIGIDESIGN
IN TOUCH MINISTRIESEMMYLOU HARRISEUPHONIX
CRYSTAL CATHEDRALDIAMOND RIOMACKIE
HEARTS OF SPACEBACKSTREET BOYSMANLEY LABS
 THE HANSONSMESA BOOGIE AMPLIFIERS
TV / RADIOPEARL JAMSONY CD MANUFACTURING
USA S.O.C.SCORPIONSSOLID STATE LOGIC
PBS S.O.C.KIDROCKYAMAHA
NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIOLUIS MIGUELSLS LOUDSPEAKERS
REGIONAL MALELEAF COM.MICHAEL JACKSONROYER LABS
KITV (FOX HONOLULU) APPOGEE
KHON (ABC HONOLULU)
UNIVERSITIES
AUDIO TECHNICA
HUGHES SATELLITE COMM.ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITYCROWN 
FOX BROADCASTINGS.U.N.Y. 
ARGYLE BROADCASTINGUNIVERSITY OF COLORADOOTHER INDUSTRIES
ABC SPORTSUNIVERSITY OF TEXASFAA (AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL)
 BALL STATE UNIVERSITYNASA / JPL LABORATORY
REMOTEUNIVERSITY OF ARIZONAOAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY
ENCORE RECORDINGOREGON STATE UNIVERSITYGEMINI OBSERVATORY (HAWAII)
EXTREME NEW MEDIAOHIO STATE UNIVERSITYLAWRENCE LIVERMORE NL
ENACTRON STUDIOSUNIVERSITY OF ALABAMAUPJOHN LABORATORIES
CSP MOBILE PRODUCTIONSAUBURN UNIVERSITYSCANDIA NL
AUDIO ANALYSTSUNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIAATT
ELECTROTECCAL. TECH.U.C.L.A. MEDICAL CENTER
 

 

 

The above list is a partial list of those who use the brand of balanced trans I use. You want to hear the lowest noise floor you can get? Use a bal trans with a proper ground rod.

MN

 
 
 
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July 21, 2011 3:32 PM

Onthlam,

Re the long list of users of balanced transformers, these look to be commercial organisations, I was referring to "ecstatic  recommendations" from normal domestic (UK) hi fi users. I also suspect the companies and organisations are based in the USA. Again my comment/query was whether balanced transformers were more suited for use in the States where mains quality and wiring standards might be different to those in the UK..

 

My spur which now consists of a separate consumer unit and then single 10mm twin and earth to a henley block. This then feeds 4 double unswitched sockets. I removed my previous earth spike for the safety reasons mentioned earlier so everything is now earthed back to the consumer unit. I do not think a separate earth spike in addition to earthing back to the consumer unit counts as a "single" earth which is what is normally advised for best sound quality.

 

I would love to know if installing a balanced tramsformer would improve things further but it would be a large undertaking for me to experiment, hence my interest in getting feedback from other (UK,in particular) users.

 

I am not saying that balanced transformers do not improve things for certain set ups. Clearly it seems that they do. There are some sceptics who do not think that Powerlines make any difference to sound quality. I am not one of those. I would  simply prefer more information/evidence as to whether balanced transformers are universally better for Naim gear.

 

As there are no apparent "safety" issues surrounding the use of balanced transformers, provided they are correctly installed,  I would be interested to know if Naim themselves have experimented with them and what their views are.

 

They have views about many things e.g sutiable NAS drives so why not on balanced transformers?

 
 
 
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July 21, 2011 3:46 PM

To my knowledge Naim *has* had one of the smaller Equitech units for evaluation...one that plugs into the wall socket rather than hardwired into the CU. I'm not too sure of what their final opinion was though.

 

I am pretty sure that you would be able to get either a loaner or a money-back guarantee on a similar in-room product at home, so that should really not be that much of a 'major undertaking'. Pretty much *any* balanced power unit will give at *least* 10dB in noise reduction and probably closer to 20-30dB. Extremely significant. The larger  units also allow much higher current delivery (constant and transient) as well as offering some additional 'filtering' via the inductance of the primary windings- which is a useful way of removing some HF junk in a relatively benign way.

 
 
 
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July 21, 2011 7:51 PM

Originally Posted by Onthlam:
Originally Posted by ursus262:

I have found advice in some Naim manuals about separate spurs.  I am sure, however, a balanced mains transformer will have the same effect on system performance

 

You are sure a balanced trans would have the same (equal) effect? On what basis of fact do you suggest this? You haven't even tried one- 

Be it known that for those who have started with a sep spur and have gone onto upgrading to a bal mains trans- there is NO comparison. The trans is light-years ahead.  In every musical way.

 

MN

 

Blimey!  I haven't actually got it yet.  Give me a chance!

 

As for the spur recommendations, I simply won't have one, because I do not have the money or willingness to turn my house upside down in order for a electrician to install new cabling;.  We had enough bother having our bespoke kitchen fitted with all the dust and mess.  Never again!

 
 
 
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July 22, 2011 12:36 AM

Go to the following site. wwwdotequitechdotcom

Here you will find all you need to know for now. This company supplies all their products in versions that are 50hz for your use.

My experience has led me to believe that the mains is the "source first" . You might consider finding out your impedance to ground. You may even consider having your mains firm put a recorder on your mains. This will communicate to you all the different opportunities you may have on your specific line.

However, it appears that all this discussion is for naught. You are not in a position to make anything happen.

MN

 
 
 
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July 22, 2011 12:39 AM

Originally Posted by Ron Toolsie:

To my knowledge Naim *has* had one of the smaller Equitech units for evaluation...one that plugs into the wall socket rather than hardwired into the CU. I'm not too sure of what their final opinion was though.

 

I am pretty sure that you would be able to get either a loaner or a money-back guarantee on a similar in-room product at home, so that should really not be that much of a 'major undertaking'. Pretty much *any* balanced power unit will give at *least* 10dB in noise reduction and probably closer to 20-30dB. Extremely significant. The larger  units also allow much higher current delivery (constant and transient) as well as offering some additional 'filtering' via the inductance of the primary windings- which is a useful way of removing some HF junk in a relatively benign way.

The response was it shows promise.

MN

 
 
 
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July 22, 2011 4:39 PM

This discussion isn't for naught.  I agree with the "source first" philosophy.  It just isn't practical to install a mains spur: I can't afford it, and my health isn't that good anyway, so I don't want the stress and the mess.

 

A Balanced Mains transformer on its own is probably a more practical solution for me.

 
 
 
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July 23, 2011 1:12 PM

Go to the following site. wwwdotequitechdotcom

Here you will find all you need to know for now. This company supplies all their products in versions that are 50hz for your use.

My experience has led me to believe that the mains is the "source first" . You might consider finding out your impedance to ground. You may even consider having your mains firm put a recorder on your mains. This will communicate to you all the different opportunities you may have on your specific line.

However, it appears that all this discussion is for naught. You are not in a position to make anything happen.

I had a look at the site and it makes for interesting reading, especially one of the detailed reviews. There appears to be no UK agent for these units though, so whether any UK produced units have the same symmetry or similar specs might be hard to establish.

 

I might have the room in my meter cupboard to install a balanced transformer provided it can be hard wired to the consumer unti and then my existing spur. Standalone units with only two plug outlets would not suit my set up.

 

However, cash and other priorities mean I won't be trying this for a while (if at all). Wish Naim,could give us a heads up or otherwise on the principle of using them in the UK.

 

Come on Naim,  you know we want to know what you think.

 
 
 
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July 23, 2011 3:49 PM

Any product on that site that has an (e) after the model number is meant for 50hz use.
Mn
 
 
 
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Guido Fawkes
 
July 23, 2011 10:34 PM

Originally Posted by ursus262:

This discussion isn't for naught.  I agree with the "source first" philosophy.  It just isn't practical to install a mains spur: I can't afford it, and my health isn't that good anyway, so I don't want the stress and the mess.

 

A Balanced Mains transformer on its own is probably a more practical solution for me.

The one in my picture is not very pretty, but it is good vfm compared with those from Trichord Research and, especially, Russ Andrews. Google Aitlink Transformers for details. I have not used one with my Naim kit, but did use one with a different humming amp that you could hear all the way from the Nene Valley and thought it made a significant difference. 

 
 
 
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Member
 
July 24, 2011 8:56 PM

Hi GF  Many thanks for your feedback.  I will be buying from the same company.  They do a socketed version at 1.5kva, which should be more than enough for the Uniti.  I'll let you know how I get on 

 
 
 
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Member
 
August 26, 2011 7:53 AM

Well, I've now got the transformer, and the results are as predicted.  My system sounds stunning with a reduction in the noise floor.

 

The only thing I had to do was to move the ground switch from 'floating' to 'chassis' as this tend to give the right results!

 

All in all, a worthwhile upgrade.

 
 
 
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