Coast to Coast

naim_nymph posted:
winkyincanada posted:
naim_nymph posted:

...consider changing the outer chainring to a 48, 49, or 50 tooth, especially if the bike comes equipped with a 53 tooth chainring, you'll be able to stay on a smaller outer chainring for longer and be able to 'spin' it easier.

 

Debs

 

Deb, why do you think spending more time in the outer chain-ring is actually an advantage? I just don't get it. I ride in the gear that suits the speed I'm going so I have my preferred cadence. Whether that's using the inner or outer chain-ring depends on that speed (uphill, downhill, headwind, tailwind etc) . Otherwise it is of no real concern to me. I don't a have "preference" for one or the other.

 

Actually, i didn't say that outer ring use is an advantage over an inner ring, what i quite clearly said is the outer ring its easier to turn if it has less teeth, in which the intension should read as obvious, especially as my comment that you've quoted is preceded by:

"Learn to ride efficiently with a natural cadence of your own ability - this will probably be around 70 - 80 pedal rpm. Learn not to grind along in a gear that's too high".

Most brand new road bikes these days come with a 53 tooth outer chainring as standard on a double, or triple chainset, however; i'd guess 90% of Joe Cycling public would find it more practical and more fun that outer ring was a 50 tooth.

Also, being able to stay [and spin a good cadence easier] on a 48 or 50 outer ring [as opposed to a 53] isn't an opinion but a physical and mechanical advantageous fact, however, if Nigel chooses to ride a typical mountain bike for his c 2 c excursion, then this outer ring size discussion is academic.

You've perhaps not shopped for bikes in a while. Nearly every new road bike comes with a Compact 50-34 front set-up as this suits the vast majority of riders. But it's all about the 34-tooth inner, not about the 50-tooth outer.

You also said this.... " you'll be able to stay on a smaller outer chainring for longer"

I don't disagree that this true. I also don't disagree that proper cadence is important. I spend more time in the 50 on one bike than I do in the 53 on the other bike (of course), but I just don't care. I can get the right cadence on either bike without issue. The benefit of the bike with the 50 is ONLY that it has a 34-tooth inner, giving me a low gear for steep climbs (of which there are quite a few on the Northshore). I couldn't care less about the amount of time I spend on the 50-tooth ring. If a 53 tooth is too large for the speed at the time, then just switch to the inner ring (likely 39 teeth). Adjust the rear as required to get the right cadence. You've not convinced me that there is any advantage in switching to a 50 tooth outer chaining (unless going full compact with a 34 tooth inner). Yeah, you would likely spend more time on the big dog, but all you've really done is reduce the range of your gears, and unnecessarily  increased the overlap between the gears available in each of the chain-rings. The only reason even a compact uses 50-tooth outer rings is that the 53-34 "jump" is too big for both front derailleurs and many rear derailleurs to cope with. A 50-39 front set-up is just silly. A 48-39 is even sillier. That's why bikes don't come that way.

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