GOTTEN

Clive B posted:
Innocent Bystander posted:

One that continually grates with me is "me neither" instead of the correct (in many cases) "nor I"

"Nor me" would, of course, be quite acceptable where you were the object of the sentence, e.g. "It was given neither to her, nor me". 

Perhaps better....  "It was given, neither to her, nor to me". If it you don't know that it was given at all given at all, it might be even better to say, "It was not given to either her nor me."

The very common, and increasing, use of the term "me neither" is as a response, just those two words.  And often it is in respnse to someone saying something like: "I don't like XXXXX", hence my particular correction: "Nor [do] I" ( do understood), but yes as I did recognise, the correct wording would indeed depend on the context.

winkyincanada posted:
Clive B posted:
Innocent Bystander posted:

One that continually grates with me is "me neither" instead of the correct (in many cases) "nor I"

"Nor me" would, of course, be quite acceptable where you were the object of the sentence, e.g. "It was given neither to her, nor me". 

Perhaps better....  "It was given, neither to her, nor to me". If it you don't know that it was given at all given at all, it might be even better to say, "It was not given to either her nor me."

"It was given, neither to her, nor to me" (implies it was given to somebody)

"It was not given to either her nor me." (doesn't imply it was given to anybody)

Huge posted:
Eloise posted:

Okay... so sometimes I jest about spelling and punctuation; but at the end of the day written word should be used to express ideas.  What is important is that what you write gets the idea across clearly but without excess waffle. 

I couldn't care less if people use got or gotten; badly use they're and their and there or put apostrophes in the wrong place so long as what they write is ultimately understandable. That doesn't mean punctuation isn't important - a long unpunctuated sentence without splitting into paragraphs is very difficult to read / understand; but its secondary to the message  

What does annoy me (and not suggesting it is happening here) is when people completely ignore the message and criticise the writer for missing an apostrophe or a capital letter. 

Eats shoots and leaves?

Eats, roots, shoots and leaves!

I've been hearing  "book it" or to "book" for decades:

To book it, which has been recorded since the 1970s, is an abbreviation of the older bookity-book, to run fast, to move quickly. This verb, which is echoic of the sound of shoes slapping on the ground, goes back at least to the 1930s, when one finds:

1935 Z.N. Hurston Mules and Men (1995) 131: Dat ole lion give John de book; de bookity book! He hauled de fast mail back into de woods.

J.N. posted:

'Booked it out of there' (as in 'left quickly') has cropped up in a Michael Connelly novel I'm reading. A friend in Boston MA hasn't heard of the expression.

Derivation/etymology?

Any light-shedders hereabouts?

John.

He’s probably heard the term “Bucked it out”.

Then incorrectly transcribed this as “booked it out”

This is one of the pitfalls of not speaking proper English.

J.N. posted:

'Booked it out of there' (as in 'left quickly') has cropped up in a Michael Connelly novel I'm reading. A friend in Boston MA hasn't heard of the expression.

Derivation/etymology?

Any light-shedders hereabouts?

John.

I was at school near Boston in the '80s and the term to "book" was used regularly to mean to go quickly, as in "he really booked", which means "he really went fast".

Despite all else I still think the most epedemic cancerous growth (I can predict someone correcting me in the use of my language)  of the English language, whether spoken by public and to my horror has crept into the television programmes such as Escape to the Country where it was spoken by the commentator (not the buyers) is the phrase 'I was stood there'.  Whats wrong with the correct grammatical term 'I was standing there?'.  At work it has become the norm to say 'I was stood there' and when I correct my colleagues to the correct term they view me with great delight and on purpose say other incorrect terms such as 'I was sat there'; but this gives me hope in that they understood the incorrect grammatical term they used.  I can still tolerate my colleagues misuse of the English Language but when it slips into the media I start to worry. Maybe the standard of editors in the media is sadly falling in regard to the correct use of the English language, I just wished the did the job correctly to the accepted standard of at least GCSE standard; is that really too much to ask of them?

Romi posted:

Despite all else I still think the most epedemic cancerous growth (I can predict someone correcting me in the use of my language)  of the English language, whether spoken by public and to my horror has crept into the television programmes such as Escape to the Country where it was spoken by the commentator (not the buyers) is the phrase 'I was stood there'.  Whats wrong with the correct grammatical term 'I was standing there?'.  At work it has become the norm to say 'I was stood there' and when I correct my colleagues to the correct term they view me with great delight and on purpose say other incorrect terms such as 'I was sat there'; but this gives me hope in that they understood the incorrect grammatical term they used.  I can still tolerate my colleagues misuse of the English Language but when it slips into the media I start to worry. Maybe the standard of editors in the media is sadly falling in regard to the correct use of the English language, I just wished the did the job correctly to the accepted standard of at least GCSE standard; is that really too much to ask of them?

Well said. But not just junk TV shows, even more formal programs. Also very is the quality of English used by teachers - even English teachers!  One that has now become so commonplace that I think a whole generation have learnt it as the norm is "one pence" - on which I even had to correct the headmistress at my sons' primary school, and that was over probably about 15 years ago.

Richard Dane posted:
J.N. posted:

'Booked it out of there' (as in 'left quickly') has cropped up in a Michael Connelly novel I'm reading. A friend in Boston MA hasn't heard of the expression.

Derivation/etymology?

Any light-shedders hereabouts?

John.

I was at school near Boston in the '80s and the term to "book" was used regularly to mean to go quickly, as in "he really booked", which means "he really went fast".

Isn't American strange?! (ANd why do Americans keep calling it English?)

Romi posted:

Despite all else I still think the most epedemic cancerous growth (I can predict someone correcting me in the use of my language)  of the English language, whether spoken by public and to my horror has crept into the television programmes such as Escape to the Country where it was spoken by the commentator (not the buyers) is the phrase 'I was stood there'.  Whats wrong with the correct grammatical term 'I was standing there?'.  At work it has become the norm to say 'I was stood there' and when I correct my colleagues to the correct term they view me with great delight and on purpose say other incorrect terms such as 'I was sat there'; but this gives me hope in that they understood the incorrect grammatical term they used.  I can still tolerate my colleagues misuse of the English Language but when it slips into the media I start to worry. Maybe the standard of editors in the media is sadly falling in regard to the correct use of the English language, I just wished the did the job correctly to the accepted standard of at least GCSE standard; is that really too much to ask of them?

You'll find a missing apostrophe and the incorrect use of a comma in your post as well as at least two spelling mistakes. 

Hungryhalibut posted:
Romi posted:

Despite all else I still think the most epedemic cancerous growth (I can predict someone correcting me in the use of my language)  of the English language, whether spoken by public and to my horror has crept into the television programmes such as Escape to the Country where it was spoken by the commentator (not the buyers) is the phrase 'I was stood there'.  Whats wrong with the correct grammatical term 'I was standing there?'.  At work it has become the norm to say 'I was stood there' and when I correct my colleagues to the correct term they view me with great delight and on purpose say other incorrect terms such as 'I was sat there'; but this gives me hope in that they understood the incorrect grammatical term they used.  I can still tolerate my colleagues misuse of the English Language but when it slips into the media I start to worry. Maybe the standard of editors in the media is sadly falling in regard to the correct use of the English language, I just wished the did the job correctly to the accepted standard of at least GCSE standard; is that really too much to ask of them?

You'll find a missing apostrophe and the incorrect use of a comma in your post as well as at least two spelling mistakes. 

YOU WILL  also find that the use of contractions  in written form are grammatically incorrect and unacceptable. But Iain't no puritan and apparently when used in a friendly way seems to be okay!

Tony2011 posted:
Hungryhalibut posted:
Romi posted:

Despite all else I still think the most epedemic cancerous growth (I can predict someone correcting me in the use of my language)  of the English language, whether spoken by public and to my horror has crept into the television programmes such as Escape to the Country where it was spoken by the commentator (not the buyers) is the phrase 'I was stood there'.  Whats wrong with the correct grammatical term 'I was standing there?'.  At work it has become the norm to say 'I was stood there' and when I correct my colleagues to the correct term they view me with great delight and on purpose say other incorrect terms such as 'I was sat there'; but this gives me hope in that they understood the incorrect grammatical term they used.  I can still tolerate my colleagues misuse of the English Language but when it slips into the media I start to worry. Maybe the standard of editors in the media is sadly falling in regard to the correct use of the English language, I just wished the did the job correctly to the accepted standard of at least GCSE standard; is that really too much to ask of them?

You'll find a missing apostrophe and the incorrect use of a comma in your post as well as at least two spelling mistakes. 

YOU WILL  also find that the use of contractions  in written form are grammatically incorrect and unacceptable. But Iain't no puritan and apparently when used in a friendly way seems to be okay!

Contractions are perfectly acceptable after eight o'clock.

Meaning of “espresso” in the English Dictionary

"espresso" in British English

 See all translations

espresso

noun [ C or U ]

uk /esˈpres.əʊ/ us /esˈpres.oʊ/ plural espressos
 

strong coffee, or a cup of this, made by forcing hot water through crushed coffee beans and served without milk

English is not my mother tongue and living in America  is difficult to learn what is the correct use of English ( spelling and grammar),  that's why the dictionary plays an important role when I try to improve my English skills.  Is the dictrionary wrong and should I say "expresso"?  Is the Cambridge Dictionary good enough?

Nick from Suffolk posted:

In many ways I think the term 'expresso' could be construed as being correct, given that 99% of coffee that is termed espresso is complete garbage and served as quickly as possible to extract the largest amount of money from the gullible cretins who buy it.

Personally I can't stand it - but I think tgat is a wrong  assessment, given the strength, though undoubtedly there's a difference between different sources, perhaps say  genuine aficionados and mass market outlets. Cappucino, which I do like, essentially is made with a shot of espresso and frothed-up milk. In some places it is tasteless, and takes at least a second espresso to taste even vaguely of coffee - but in good places it has a decent coffee flavour, but without the painfully intense bitterness of espresso. I also enjoy coffee with milk, which in some places is made with the same espresso, with added hot water and a moderate amount of milk.

That said, I have to observe that my best experiences of coffee have been in other countries, not Britain, so maybe your assessment of eXpresso is generally appropriate here...

Nick from Suffolk posted:

In many ways I think the term 'expresso' could be construed as being correct, given that 99% of coffee that is termed espresso is complete garbage and served as quickly as possible to extract the largest amount of money from the gullible cretins who buy it.

I may be a gullible cretin, but I'll drink whatever coffee I like, thanks. In my experience, any establishment that sells weak espresso will also sell regular coffee that tastes like dishwater too, and should be avoided. It's an unfortunate fact that us tea-drinking Brits don't do coffee very well. 

I'm quite partial to a smarting espresso. You can tell it's a good one by the temperature,  too hot and it will be spoiled. Made at 90 degrees and served at an easy to drink straight away 60 something degrees (please correct me as I'm not sure the precise temperature) is how it should be.

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