Guitars, guitars, guitars!

My main two basses - both 6-string from a fine Polish luthier called Mayones.

The top one: active EMG pickups and electronics (3-band active preamp), 18V for extra headroom.
The bottom one: passive Nordstrand single-coil pickups and active 3-band Aguilar pre-amp, 18V for extra headroom.

 

First up, the main rack.

Here we have a Fender J S1. Nothing special and bought on a whim off ebay. This is my Motown bass complete with foam insert at the bridge and tapewound strings. I do have flatwounds as a spare.

Then the real funk machine MM Stingray, 3 Eq. Lovely instrument. Play anything on this.

Ricky 4001 from 1981. Bought in London as a rare peice. Memories as I got my first lessons on one at Uni in 1979. Heavy and needs some repair, only the bridge pickup currently working.

Then we have the most recent addition as I hankered after a P-bass. Great Lakland craftsmanship and great tone. Passive with block inlay. Oh yes and the head and cab. Ashdown ABM 500.

Seems we have quite a few sidemen on here.

Dave

 

Main rig: Mesa Boogie Carbine M6 + MesaBoogie 1 x 15" and 2x10', TC Electronic G-System (modulation effects, relay switching and loop effects switching) and some assorted pedals. One note: compressor is from Demeter (the yellow pedal on the left) - probably the best compressor I've ever used. 

 

Adam Zielinski posted:

Main rig: Mesa Boogie Carbine M6 + MesaBoogie 1 x 15" and 2x10', TC Electronic G-System (modulation effects, relay switching and loop effects switching) and some assorted pedals. One note: compressor is from Demeter (the yellow pedal on the left) - probably the best compressor I've ever used. 

 

Wow.  Very nice.  Respect...

Dave The Bass posted:

I've gone lightweight as I'm not as young as I used to be...  The cab is a Super Compact and the sound is brilliant for something that just weights 10kg.  and with the Aguilar the overall tone is still pretty good, though no doubt a Demeter compressor would add to the impact...

 

I like that amp! Played it once and it sounded very right to my ears.

Demeter - yes. Highly recommended - one pedal effect I could not live without. Ok - the other one is my trusted Boss Bass Overdrive which I bought new in 1992 in Denmark St (London). It's still with me and still sounds perfect.

winkyincanada posted:
Adam Zielinski posted:
 

 

.....which I bought new in 1992 in Denmark St (London)......

Denmark St hosts a lot of guitar porn. I still regret not going into hock for the 1961 Stratocaster I saw there a few years back.

Once I walked into a store there. Suddey three scruffy-looking guys walk in and start testing some gear. We looked at each other with the shop owner and said: Is it really THEM????

THEM was: more or less the early 90's The Cure line-up: Robert Smith, Simon Gallup and another chap whos name escapes me now.

My latest addition, not in any "group photo" posted to date:

Took a flyer on this Agile LP knock off - removed the cream colored pick guard.

Solid mahogany body, spalted cap top (not just a veneer), ebony board, Graph-Tec nut & saddle, coil tapping. FIt and finish are very good. Weighs in at about 9.5 lbs like a real LP. Alnico magnet humbuckers. Grover 18:1 tuners - built in S. Korea.

Might still change the pickups for some DiMarzios, but the stock ones are quite good so I am in no hurry, if ever. Sounds pretty comparable to my Gibson SG.

I would rate it at about 80% of a Gibson. Neck feels great and very comfortable. And best of all, it was $399 (plus $65 for a case) instead of $2,500-$3,000. So very comparable performance for about 15% of the outlay.

VERY happy with this purchase. Ignore the ugly reflection in the bridge pickup.

 

DrMark posted:

My latest addition, not in any "group photo" posted to date:

Took a flyer on this Agile LP knock off - removed the cream colored pick guard.

Solid mahogany body, spalted cap top (not just a veneer), ebony board, Graph-Tec nut & saddle, coil tapping. FIt and finish are very good. Weighs in at about 9.5 lbs like a real LP. Alnico magnet humbuckers. Grover 18:1 tuners - built in S. Korea.

Might still change the pickups for some DiMarzios, but the stock ones are quite good so I am in no hurry, if ever. Sounds pretty comparable to my Gibson SG.

I would rate it at about 80% of a Gibson. Neck feels great and very comfortable. And best of all, it was $399 (plus $65 for a case) instead of $2,500-$3,000. So very comparable performance for about 15% of the outlay.

VERY happy with this purchase. Ignore the ugly reflection in the bridge pickup.

 

Yeah, some good value "off-brand". These guys are doing business in my neighbourhood. The guitars look very nice indeed. Asian made, but a Canadian company and Canadian-sourced woods.

http://www.prestigeguitars.com/

 

 

winkyincanada posted:
tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

Very nice indeed.

Thank you Winky!

tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

 photo Guitar and Stool-2_zpspr3jyc6p.jpg

 

 photo Guitar and Stool-1_zpsdd6gvgwy.jpg

Cool stool man!  Guitar looks beautifully made. 

Some very nice gear. Will try and post a pic of my pedal board. 

How many people playing live? 

tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

 photo Guitar and Stool-2_zpspr3jyc6p.jpg

 

 photo Guitar and Stool-1_zpsdd6gvgwy.jpg

Both the guitar and stool/stand are awesome - I wish I had those kinds of skills.

I read somewhere a LONG time ago that they did a study on professions and longevity, and luthier came in second of all. (Don't even recall what was first.) But it makes sense - luthiers are almost invariably working on something they love, it is artistic (right brain) and analytic (left brain), it is visual and sonic, you get to use your hands and brain, and unless you are working for a corporate outfit, the boutique makers sort of work at their own pace.

Man, my job sucks - lol!

Oh, and I play live in my living room on the infrequent moments that life permits - I really need to get off this hamster wheel i am on, because it is literally going to kill me.

stuart posted:
tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

Cool stool man!  Guitar looks beautifully made.

Some very nice gear. Will try and post a pic of my pedal board. 

How many people playing live? 

Thanks Stuart! I'm not playing live. Sadly, I neglected the guitar for nearly thirty years after playing in bands throughout my teens and early twenties. Now I seem to be better at working with wood than at playing the resulting instrument. I have a classical guitar that just needs final neck shaping and I've started building a replica Gibson ES-335, so I really should concentrate on playing a bit more.

 

DrMark posted:
tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

Both the guitar and stool/stand are awesome - I wish I had those kinds of skills.

I read somewhere a LONG time ago that they did a study on professions and longevity, and luthier came in second of all. (Don't even recall what was first.) But it makes sense - luthiers are almost invariably working on something they love, it is artistic (right brain) and analytic (left brain), it is visual and sonic, you get to use your hands and brain, and unless you are working for a corporate outfit, the boutique makers sort of work at their own pace.

Man, my job sucks - lol!

Oh, and I play live in my living room on the infrequent moments that life permits - I really need to get off this hamster wheel i am on, because it is literally going to kill me.

Thanks DrMark!

That's encouraging stuff about luthiers (not that I can really count myself as one - I'm working on my third guitar at the moment).

As to getting off the hamster wheel, I've been very fortunate and can now indulge myself in working with wood without the pressure to earn a serious income from it. I hope you're able to get off the wheel before too long.

Tim

tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

 photo Guitar and Stool-2_zpspr3jyc6p.jpg

 

 photo Guitar and Stool-1_zpsdd6gvgwy.jpg

Tim

Stunning looking guiatr and its stand / plaing chair.

Have you ever considered building an acoustic bass guitar? If you are up for a challenge of building one do drop me an email - it's in my profile.

Best,

Adam

tjbnz posted:
stuart posted:
tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

Cool stool man!  Guitar looks beautifully made.

Some very nice gear. Will try and post a pic of my pedal board. 

How many people playing live? 

Thanks Stuart! I'm not playing live. Sadly, I neglected the guitar for nearly thirty years after playing in bands throughout my teens and early twenties. Now I seem to be better at working with wood than at playing the resulting instrument. I have a classical guitar that just needs final neck shaping and I've started building a replica Gibson ES-335, so I really should concentrate on playing a bit more.

 

DrMark posted:
tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

Both the guitar and stool/stand are awesome - I wish I had those kinds of skills.

I read somewhere a LONG time ago that they did a study on professions and longevity, and luthier came in second of all. (Don't even recall what was first.) But it makes sense - luthiers are almost invariably working on something they love, it is artistic (right brain) and analytic (left brain), it is visual and sonic, you get to use your hands and brain, and unless you are working for a corporate outfit, the boutique makers sort of work at their own pace.

Man, my job sucks - lol!

Oh, and I play live in my living room on the infrequent moments that life permits - I really need to get off this hamster wheel i am on, because it is literally going to kill me.

Thanks DrMark!

That's encouraging stuff about luthiers (not that I can really count myself as one - I'm working on my third guitar at the moment).

As to getting off the hamster wheel, I've been very fortunate and can now indulge myself in working with wood without the pressure to earn a serious income from it. I hope you're able to get off the wheel before too long.

Tim

Just keep playing,  it's good for the soul. I took 12 years out of barely playing for reasons I won't go into but got back in a band 3 years ago and after a lot of hard work I'm absolutely loving playing live again. But as long as your playing and enjoying It that's all that matters 

Funnily enough I also love salsa dancing. Seems strange, playing blues rock guitar but it is great fun and keeps the body and mind in good shape. Some interesting music too. A great social scene with people who love music. Haven't met anyone yet with a good hifi system though. 

Adam Zielinski posted:
tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

Tim

Stunning looking guiatr and its stand / plaing chair.

Have you ever considered building an acoustic bass guitar? If you are up for a challenge of building one do drop me an email - it's in my profile.

Best,

Adam

Thanks Adam! An acoustic bass guitar is on my radar - I like the idea of moving gently beyond guitars. I don't know much about them and in my (listening) experience they lack volume. Do you know of any particularly successful models?

Tim

stuart posted:
tjbnz posted:
stuart posted:
tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

Cool stool man!  Guitar looks beautifully made.

Some very nice gear. Will try and post a pic of my pedal board. 

How many people playing live? 

Thanks Stuart! I'm not playing live. Sadly, I neglected the guitar for nearly thirty years after playing in bands throughout my teens and early twenties. Now I seem to be better at working with wood than at playing the resulting instrument. I have a classical guitar that just needs final neck shaping and I've started building a replica Gibson ES-335, so I really should concentrate on playing a bit more.

Just keep playing,  it's good for the soul. I took 12 years out of barely playing for reasons I won't go into but got back in a band 3 years ago and after a lot of hard work I'm absolutely loving playing live again. But as long as your playing and enjoying It that's all that matters 

Funnily enough I also love salsa dancing. Seems strange, playing blues rock guitar but it is great fun and keeps the body and mind in good shape. Some interesting music too. A great social scene with people who love music. Haven't met anyone yet with a good hifi system though. 

You're right - I need to get back into it.

It's interesting that people who are really into music, including most of the musicians I know, don't seem at all concerned with how it's reproduced.

tjbnz posted:
Adam Zielinski posted:
tjbnz posted:

My first guitar build - based fairly approximately on a Taylor. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, mahogany neck with ebony fretboard and bridge. The stool is walnut and sycamore and it took a lot longer to make!

Tim

Stunning looking guiatr and its stand / plaing chair.

Have you ever considered building an acoustic bass guitar? If you are up for a challenge of building one do drop me an email - it's in my profile.

Best,

Adam

Thanks Adam! An acoustic bass guitar is on my radar - I like the idea of moving gently beyond guitars. I don't know much about them and in my (listening) experience they lack volume. Do you know of any particularly successful models?

Tim

In a way acoustic basses are generally quiet and need some work to sound good. Probably the best sounding one I've heard was built by Abracham Wechter for Jonas Hellborg.

"It's interesting that people who are really into music, including most of the musicians I know, don't seem at all concerned with how it's reproduced."

That mirrors in large measure my experience & observations...with some notable exceptions of course. (Not me...I do not qualify as a 'musician' - more of a 'wannabe'.)

Was going to post images of my 8 guitars/ 1 bass/ 2 amps here, but Photobucket ain't cooperating.  Before someone says 'read the faq (naim forums), well I've been doing it EXACTLY as written down.  When I click on the box next to share 'direct' on my library page, no link is copied (it doesn't flash yellow or say 'copied')!  I'll have to try and sort it out or uses another hosting site.  Any suggestions?

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