Hiigher volume listening

Innocent Bystander posted:

As an aside Mike-B mentioned Roger Waters - what album? I actually found the 24/192 version of Amused to Death far inferior in sound quality to the ripped CD, and only play the latter  - and yes, there are places where the music makes you jump if listened to at a moderate average level - effective isn't it? I don't run for the door, though, and I have no fear for the speakers as I know they can handle it, and more (which they get to do occasionally!) The uncanny thing with that album is the spoken voice as if someone is sitting on the sofa just left of you, even though you know the speakers are in front!

.......  what album ??  whoops,  (note to self,  read the freekin words)   Yes = Amused to Death.    I had the original CD ripped & then after hearing the 2015 remix/remaster on a friends system I bought it in 24/192.   You didn't say if your CD is the remaster or original version, very different,  but I did not keep my CD rip.   My fear for my speakers is metaphorical.

My CD was the original release, ripped with dbpoweramp. And I bought the hi res remaster last year thinking it would becthe icing on the cake, but was very disappointed. I couldn't be bothered to compare side by side to pick out the difference, but IIRC it just sounded uninspiring or flat. After one play I didn't bother again, except once I cued the wrong one by mistake and it wasn't long before my ears told me there was something wrong, and I changed to the CD one.

since then I have seen others also say the high res one is worse, so your opposire reaction is interesting - makes me wonder if your CD rip was bad for some reason, or if there are some fake high res ones about.

Innocent Bystander posted:

As an aside Mike-B mentioned Roger Waters  ...............   The uncanny thing with that album is the spoken voice as if someone is sitting on the sofa just left of you, even though you know the speakers are in front!

I think you have the CD release with ‘Q Sound’,  this is a 3-dimensional sound process designed to simulate a surround sound effect with 2 channel to give a similar effect to the SACD (5.1) release.  It wasn't carried forward into the 2015 remix/remaster. 

I found the effect only happens if you sit dead centre - the seats of my sofa either side of me don't get that 'right beside you' voice. I recall Pink Floyd were experimenting with 'holographic' recording at the time of Final Cut, so I have assumed this was a progression from that - and that it was embedded in all of at least the original releases. 

I'm away now for a holiday- when I get back I'll see if my 192/24 version has the same effect.

Musky posted:

Hi

I'm new to this forum and would welcome advice please.....

My system comprises NDX,CDX,NAC 202,NAC 200, Flatcap , NAPSC and Allaes.

My system is great for me however when I require higher sound levels for parties a speaker makes a "popping" sound once the volume is turned to 12 o'clock.

My amp is rated 70w and my speakers 6 ohms 100 w so I was thinking about either upgrading the amp to NAC 250 (80 W) or upgrading my speakers to say 150w.

Any thoughts would be much appreciated.

Thanks

 

 

 

The "popping" sound are your ear drums breaking apart .

Huge posted:
No quarter posted:

Huge,my hearing must be shot then...I also have a 272 with a 250dr,my speakers are 92 DB at  1 meter and 8 ohm.My normal listening level is 45 or 50 on the dial,when I have Internet radio playing as background music it is usually at 30 on the dial.When I am critical listening and a good song comes on that I want to "crank up"...I hit 60 on the dial,am i alone in this?

Actually it's more likely to be age related hearing loss on my part that makes me more sensitive to loudness!

I prefer to listen at 73-76dBA(slow) with occasional brief excursions to about 80dBA(slow).
These levels are quite low by most people's standards, but they suit my ears.  However, many recent CDs with the volume at '12:00' would give well over 95dBA(slow) with peaks well in excess of 103dBA(fast).

85-92 fast is tops for me. THat equates to about 10:30 on the 32.5.

Mike-B posted:
Innocent Bystander posted:

 The uncanny thing with that album is the spoken voice as if someone is sitting on the sofa just left of you, even though you know the speakers are in front!

I suspect holophonics are playing their part. PF started using them in the late 70s to augment their albums.

I do agree with another general consensus that some material has to have the right level to sound as it should due to its recorded particularities - rather like the focus view through old cameras - everything gets into sharp focus. To low or to high and it's askew.   Well known tracks have a memorised zone on the volume dial. Some tracks just won't get played past a certain time in the night for fear of the neighbours banging on the front door.

Mike-B posted:
Innocent Bystander posted:

As an aside Mike-B mentioned Roger Waters  ...............   The uncanny thing with that album is the spoken voice as if someone is sitting on the sofa just left of you, even though you know the speakers are in front!

I think you have the CD release with ‘Q Sound’,  this is a 3-dimensional sound process designed to simulate a surround sound effect with 2 channel to give a similar effect to the SACD (5.1) release.  It wasn't carried forward into the 2015 remix/remaster. 

Innocent Bystander posted:

I found the effect only happens if you sit dead centre - the seats of my sofa either side of me don't get that 'right beside you' voice. I recall Pink Floyd were experimenting with 'holographic' recording at the time of Final Cut, so I have assumed this was a progression from that - and that it was embedded in all of at least the original releases. 

I'm away now for a holiday- when I get back I'll see if my 192/24 version has the same effect.

I can now confirm that the effect is the same on both on my ripped original CD release, and the downloaded 24/196 remix. But it really is only when dead centre - a foot to left or right and the voice retreats closer to the speaker.

interesting comparing these two versions now, first time doing that since I have had Dave in the system: where the CD version sounds better is places like the drums on the bravery of being out of range which have more punch on the CD version, sounding more like a drumkit in front of me. But the differences are interesting - e.g.  the on Perfect Sence Part 1, where the hi res version has the voice of Hal from 2001 a Space Odyssey instead of what sounds like Bill Hubbard's voice.

×
×
×
×