NAIM tested NAS drives

updated list Feb 20th


• Pass
– Netgear ReadyNas Duo (FW 4.1.6)
– D-Link DNS-323 (FW 1.07)
– Patriot Corza PCZ35SNAS2 (FW 1.471B)
– Buffalo linkstation pro (FW 1.15)
– Thecus N5200 (FW 2.00.15)
– Thecus N5500 (FW 3.00.04)
– Iomega ix2 NAS (FW 2 0 15 43099)
– QNAP TS-409 Pro (FW 3.1.0 Build 0708T)
– LACIE 2BIG (Linux 2.6.22.7, System version 2.2.0)
– RIPNAS 1TB (2*500GB)
• (Intel Atom processor at 1.6GHz with 2Gb of RAM ,Windows Home Server software 6.0.243.0 with power pack3, and Asset UPnP Version 2.0)

FW = firmware

Notes
• Naim NAS Simulation test tool was used to assess suitability of each NAS.
• Hard disc drive used in the NAS can effect results.
• Seagate Barracuda or Western Digital Caviar Green Drives were used in tests at Naim.
• Different hard drives might result in different results
• A wired Ethernet connection was used for all tests.
Original Post
Paul,

If you are avoiding publishing those that failed (and that's understandable I think), perhaps you can at least say how many were tested in total...
For example, if 10 passed out of a total of 100 tested, this would at least impart a sense of proportion by revealing the 'pass rate' (which in this example would be a 10% pass rate).
Just a thought...

Tonytronic Winker
Yes we will Tom and right now on balance we think its not fair to list fails. Our test tool is tough and designed at fitting Nas to Naim, it may well be that the Nas units that fail are fine with everything except the Naim test and we do not wish to get involved with knocking something which actually fits its promise.
I understand not wishing to knock other manufacturer's products.
Can you give an indication of what makes a NAS suitable for Naim. e.g. low audible noise, power consumption, quality of audio signal etc. Currently i don't know what features are important for digital media storage.

This is a useful project/thread, thanks.
there lots of well spec nas out there, from manufacturers that have been the pc world for a long time. i have the ripnas and back up with the samsung story 1.5 tera. and just to be sure ive backed to a 2nd nas and packed it away out of harms way . 2500 cds ripnased ,no problem at all. cost of 2 backup drives £150. the point is 2 back ups is just more reassuring. the ripnas is very quiet and so is the samsung allan
n
quote:
Originally posted by Tom_W:
I understand not wishing to knock other manufacturer's products.
Can you give an indication of what makes a NAS suitable for Naim. e.g. low audible noise, power consumption, quality of audio signal etc. Currently i don't know what features are important for digital media storage.

This is a useful project/thread, thanks.


Tom

If you look at this thread here you can see what aspects are being tested by the Naim NAS-test tool.

It is really about, besides being able to connect to the NAS in the first place, performance of the network connection to the NAS and whether there are detectable audio break-ups.

quote:
Result:
Name: Initial Connect Time
Measured:
Threshold: < 5000 ms
PassFail:

Result:
Name: Average Write Throughput
Measured:
Threshold: > 2 Mbyte / sec
PassFail:

Result:
Name: Average Read Response Time
Measured:
Threshold: < 25 ms
PassFail:

Result:
Name: Max Read Response Time
Measured:
Threshold: < 500 ms
PassFail:

Result:
Name: Total Audio Breakups
Measured:
Threshold: = 0
PassFail:

Result:
Name: File Scanning Performance
Measured:
Threshold: > 10 per second
PassFail:


5 out of 6 test criteria are about speed and performance, 1 is about audio breaks.

If one does the test at home, then this test does not just test the NAS itself, but also the effects of the network connection between the test-tool and the NAS-machine.
Failing to meet the Naim criteria can not always be attributed to only the NAS-machine. The load of the test-PC running the test-tool, the quality of all intermediary networkcomponents and not in the least the network load itself caused by other users / usage of the network all have an effect on the outcome of the testtool.

From a Naim (HDX / NS01) point of view that doesn't matter because it requires a good quality datafeed, but it is not always the NAS that is at fault if the test fails a home.

The best test setup for testing the NAS, would be a dedicated PC which just runs the Naim NAS-test tool, and no other programs, and a 'direct' (over a switch would be easiest) connection between dedicated PC and NAS. This way one can exclude most other influences.

-
aleg
quote:
Originally posted by Paul Stephenson:
...
Notes
...
• Seagate Barracuda or Western Digital Caviar Green Drives were used in tests at Naim.
...


I want to give a small warning about using Western Digital Caviar Green Drives.

It has been known that Western Digital Caviar Green Drives can cause time-outs when used under Linux OS (which is used in most NAS's). The IntelliPark feature of these drives can, under Linux, constantly park the disk heads thus causing an I/O-wait and long time-outs.

The following is a quote from the Ubuntu Forum regarding this issue with the Western Digital Caviar Green Drives.

quote:
Re: kjournald2 blocked for more than 120 seconds

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Well, I seem to have solved the problem.

Apperantly it's Western Digital's Green disks which aren't what I would call "compatible" to us Linux-users. The IntelliPark feature seems to constantly park the disk heads thus causing the I/O-wait.

... so I went back, told Western Digital support (which said that they don't offer support for Linux)


Samsung Drives seem to operate without any problems.

I have one Western Digital Caviar Green disk and can confirm this issue exists. For me only when writing to the drive for the first time after boot, so it is only a minor nuissance for me, when I remember it in time.

-
aleg
I just ran a 1-hour test on my Synology 209+ (2 x Western Digital WD10FYPS) connected via a Netgear Gigabit Router to my Shuttle SG33G6. There were no problems reported although I used the computer at the same time to surf the net etc.

I will subject the set-up to a 24-hour test at a later point in time when my little family won't be needing the Synology + Wireless router + Internet connection.

Best wishes,
Peter
quote:
Originally posted by djh1697:
How about a USB2 drive connected to a PC then via a router ?


Depends on how you make it visible from your PC. It should be visible as a network share and all proper access rights should be set.

As long as it is a network share visible over SMB, I guess it should be usable.

-
aleg
quote:
I want to give a small warning about using Western Digital Caviar Green Drives.

It has been known that Western Digital Caviar Green Drives can cause time-outs when used under Linux OS (which is used in most NAS's). The IntelliPark feature of these drives can, under Linux, constantly park the disk heads thus causing an I/O-wait and long time-outs.


I've read a lot online about this too. I'm using Samsung 1.5TB F2s, as they seemed to be recommended, and were listed in the "Compatable HDDs" on the QNAP website.
quote:
Originally posted by Right Wing:
I want to buy a NAS for my MacbookPro.

The Buffalo linkstation pro's look good. Can anyone advise exactly which model naim refer to?

There are a lot of 'pro' models on the market.

cheers


RightWing

Looking at the Buffalo website there is actually only one Linkstation Pro model which comes with a choice of 3 sizes for storage capacity. So I would say it is pretty clear.

Cheers

aleg
quote:
Originally posted by Aleg:
quote:
Originally posted by Right Wing:
I want to buy a NAS for my MacbookPro.

The Buffalo linkstation pro's look good. Can anyone advise exactly which model naim refer to?

There are a lot of 'pro' models on the market.

cheers


RightWing

Looking at the Buffalo website there is actually only one Linkstation Pro model which comes with a choice of 3 sizes for storage capacity. So I would say it is pretty clear.

Cheers

aleg


cheers mate. I was looking on amazon.co.uk and got confused. will head to the buffalo site now.

many thanks
Probably going to buy a NAS drive soon, and the Buffalo's look very interesting.

Just wondering if Naim have actually tested the Buffalo linkstation duo drives, as the idea of using RAID for backup redundancy is appealing - mainly for the security of having 2 copies of the data. If ordinary pro would get 2TB, if duo, would be the 4TB model (I've got a LOT of CDs)

Alas, when I look at the specs for these drives, I never see any information about how noisy they are. Very relevant if they are likely to be sited in the same room as the hifi!
quote:
Originally posted by Dungassin:
Probably going to buy a NAS drive soon, and the Buffalo's look very interesting.

Just wondering if Naim have actually tested the Buffalo linkstation duo drives, as the idea of using RAID for backup redundancy is appealing - mainly for the security of having 2 copies of the data. If ordinary pro would get 2TB, if duo, would be the 4TB model (I've got a LOT of CDs)

Alas, when I look at the specs for these drives, I never see any information about how noisy they are. Very relevant if they are likely to be sited in the same room as the hifi!


Dungassin

RAID doesn't offer you any backup features, it just protects against sudden hardware failure.

It doesn't offer you any backup because if you or the OS writes a wrong file / deletes a file it will always write or delete it from the RAID section as well. So there is no protection again user or software failures only hardware failure.
Hardware failures are in my experience very rare if you use proper brand hardware and also a thing to remind is that when you start to use two new discs at the same time they will probably both die at around the same time because they have an equal life expectancy.

IMHO RAID is somewhat useless in a home situation. I have multi TB storage and I won't use RAID, I just make backups.

For true security you need to make backups with a proper backup software on an offline medium. I use a 2nd NAS with swappable drives to take the backups of my first NAS.

-
aleg
quote:
RAID doesn't offer you any backup features, it just protects against sudden hardware failure.

It doesn't offer you any backup because if you or the OS writes a wrong file / deletes a file it will always write or delete it from the RAID section as well. So there is no protection again user or software failures only hardware failure.
Hardware failures are in my experience very rare if you use proper brand hardware and also a thing to remind is that when you start to use two new discs at the same time they will probably both die at around the same time because they have an equal life expectancy.

IMHO RAID is somewhat useless in a home situation. I have multi TB storage and I won't use RAID, I just make backups.

For true security you need to make backups with a proper backup software on an offline medium. I use a 2nd NAS with swappable drives to take the backups of my first NAS.

Thanks. The only reason I had was possible hardware failure. Over the years I have had several hard drives fail, and as a result I always keep 2 backups of all my files - currently on the little external laptop type drives. My standard approach (which I have recently followed again) is that, as soon as one of my backup hard drives fail, is to get another backup drive as soon as possible to replace it. Your solution sounds sensible.

So ... as regards the Buffalo pro drives (not duo) does it matter which model? As said before, I would be happier with a 2TB version if that will work OK with the Unitiserve.
quote:
Originally posted by Dungassin:

Thanks. The only reason I had was possible hardware failure.



OK, you are at least aware of it. Smile

quote:

So ... as regards the Buffalo pro drives (not duo) does it matter which model? As said before, I would be happier with a 2TB version if that will work OK with the Unitiserve.


I have not seen any manual of the UnitiServe but I can't imagine storage size being of any consequence. That part, of maintaining the file structure, is taken care of by the NAS (which normally runs on some kind of Linux which you don't really notice much of).

I run a bigger than 2 TB NAS which I can happily approach from both my Windows machine ( like the UnitiServe is) and Linux based mediaplayer.

If you want to be 100% sure I would write an email to Naim support.

-
aleg
quote:
I run a bigger than 2 TB NAS which I can happily approach from both my Windows machine ( like the UnitiServe is) and Linux based mediaplayer.

If you want to be 100% sure I would write an email to Naim support.

Not totally wedded to the Buffalo, but I had heard (forget where from) that it was quiet, which is important as it would be in the same room as the system.

I would keep that drive purely for audio use ATM.

Presumably if I manually backed up from an NAS drive to a detachable drive, the copy would still be bit-perfect?
quote:
Originally posted by Dungassin:
Presumably if I manually backed up from an NAS drive to a detachable drive, the copy would still be bit-perfect?


Yes, as long as your backup software does a verification run, to verify that the files backed up are identical to the originals.

If you are planning to do a manual copy by hand and not using Backup software, I would use an MD5 hashing program (freeware) to do the verification myself.

-
aleg
I can use a computer pretty basically compared with many of you, but even after 15+ years to be honest it's not much more to me than a typewriter connected to a thin black box and a little telly! By using analogies, I do understand what the main active components are inside, but that's it!

So you will understand that as interested as I am trying to become in this distibuted audio business, progress is slow.

So I would like to thank Paul very much for starting this very helpful thread of highly practical application.

A shortlist of partnering storage components of the necessary standard is very useful indeed.

By the time I can afford to dip my toes into the world of UnitiServe, I might just about understand it!

Good wishes,
James
quote:
Originally posted by Alamanka:
Hello,

Did you test the Synology DS209+II or any other Synology product?

One user on the forum (Malicorne) reported streaming issue when using the DS209 with the Uniti. Has this been investigated?

Thanks.


Hi Everyone,

I bought a Synonology DS410j and had it connected and streaming to my Uniti within 30 minutes.

With the exception of the gapless issue, no problems so far.
quote:
Originally posted by AndyHamburg:
quote:
Originally posted by Alamanka:
Hello,

Did you test the Synology DS209+II or any other Synology product?

One user on the forum (Malicorne) reported streaming issue when using the DS209 with the Uniti. Has this been investigated?

Thanks.


Hi Everyone,

I bought a Synonology DS410j and had it connected and streaming to my Uniti within 30 minutes.

With the exception of the gapless issue, no problems so far.


Hallo Andy,

Vielen Dank fur deine Antwort. Es kommt aber zu spat, als Ich einen Qnap server gekauft habe.

I did not want to take the risk of buying something that was not on the tested list, so I got a Qnap server with Twonky media server on it. It works well.

Thanks for replying, though, I am sure it will help others.

Bis bald,
Recently been through the rigmarole of doing a clean install of Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit on my Acer laptop. Now I can't seem to get my Buffalo 2TB Linkstation Pro to work. My home network is CAT6 wired, and I usually have the laptops wifi switched off (unless using it in another room)

I tried initially with its supplied CD. All seemed to install correctly, after I remembered to reinitialise the Buffalo first! All the expected icons appeared on my desktop, but when I tried to access the Buffalo drive, I am immediately asked for a network password and username. I have no such username or password, and don't know what it's asking for. I tried accessing it using wifi (after disconnecting the ethernet cable), and using my BTHomehub2 WPA key as the password. No joy.

There is only one user (John) set up on my laptop. My only network is my "homegroup". When I set up my laptop I changed its name to AFAIR to the one I used before. I have, from choice, left my Windows 7 installation so that it does not ask for a password at startup - after all, the only ones using it are me and my family.

So, I have downloaded various firmware/software upgrades from the Buffalo site. So far have only tried the latest version of the installion CD image (after extracting it from its zip file). That is even worse, and just keeps cycling through the screen at "step 4", which is the one where it asks you to click on "NEXT" after the top light on the Buffalo drive stops blinking.

Buffalo site and Buffalo FAQs alas not really helpful. Anyone here have any ideas?
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Mrox
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