What are you listening to and WHY might anyone be interested? (Vol. XIII)

dave marshall posted:

  Rag 'n Bone Man - Human.

  Another favourite from 2017 .............. what a soul voice this guy has .................. a bit "pop", yet awfully good.

My niece is in the  video for - As You Are - another one of Rag 'n Bone Man's singles she is a close friend of his partner and says he is an absolute gentlemen. 

Having mentioned on here yesterday the merits of the second CD in this special edition, I thought I'd remind myself how good it is. Five songs from one of her concerts in Paris. Lovely. Now looking forward to her forthcoming Live In Europe album.

BTW imgur is now behaving again  

ewemon posted:

An official recording (not MP3 as per cover)- unreleased.

 

I saw her on that tour. A fabulous night at an intimate venue:

RICKIE LEE JONES **** QUEEN'S HALL, EDINBURGH NO MATTER how cheerful or romantic their lyrical content, there is a certain sadness to Rickie Lee Jones's songs. It's hard to place where this comes from, but perhaps it's down to her laid-back, somewhat doleful performance manner. While the Chicagoan has maintained a clearly loving fanbase over the years, her live presence is decidedly unstarry. This makes it all the more striking, then, when she does actually let rip with a song. Her playing, together with that of multi-instrumentalist Lionel Cole and bassist Jose Maramba, is blessed with a mesmerising, intuitive resonance that is borderline spectacular in places. The lengthy Living It Up was the centrepiece of the show, and it saw the trio almost play musical chairs throughout, with Jones moving from piano to drums, Cole from drums to keyboard and Maramba sawing away at his bass with a bow. Fusing rhythm and blues with jazz, it was one of those rare live moments which deserves the term electrifying. Otherwise, Jones's singular voice carried the occasion, a high-pitched and hopeful holler which sounds fragile to the point of breaking at any moment. She sang in praise of her daughter on Wild Girl ("if I can't give her advice, at least I can give her a song"), in tribute to her father with The Moon is Made of Gold, a song he wrote, and of beautiful, pained romance and nostalgia on Bonfires and On Saturday Afternoons in 1963, respectively. The closing Chuck E's in Love naturally earned much applause, but her biggest hit still didn't steal this memorable show.

G

Now Playing....

Blues Traveler - Four

Blues Traveler - Four

Streaming on NAS........  Random pick from something old, something blue from the mid-90's

Review from All Music by Stephen Thomas Earlewine here:

Lacking the rootsier edge of Save His Soul, Four finds Blues Traveler retreating to their standard blues-boogie formula, with mixed results. Of course, there are some fine songs here -- including their breakthrough hit single, "Run-Around" -- but too often the band sounds like it's coasting. Four is a solid record, but it shows signs that the band's formula may be wearing thin.

james n posted:

Nice to have a few hours to sit down in front of the hi-fi after the Christmas relative entertaining and travel fest.

Starting with Hannah Peel, a new artist to me and this album. 

Imagine going from Barnsley to outer space. This is what Northern Irish electronic artist Hannah Peel explores on this new opus. It's the story of an elderly pioneering electronic music artist who dreams of leaving her Barnsley home and seeing Cassiopeia for herself

Hannah Peel - Mary Casio: Journey To Cassiopeia

 

This is really rather lovely, and sneaked past most people this year. If you don't think a full colliery brass band (and synths) doesn't sound cosmic...

 

GraemeH posted:
ewemon posted:

An official recording (not MP3 as per cover)- unreleased.

 

I saw her on that tour. A fabulous night at an intimate venue:

RICKIE LEE JONES **** QUEEN'S HALL, EDINBURGH NO MATTER how cheerful or romantic their lyrical content, there is a certain sadness to Rickie Lee Jones's songs. It's hard to place where this comes from, but perhaps it's down to her laid-back, somewhat doleful performance manner. While the Chicagoan has maintained a clearly loving fanbase over the years, her live presence is decidedly unstarry. This makes it all the more striking, then, when she does actually let rip with a song. Her playing, together with that of multi-instrumentalist Lionel Cole and bassist Jose Maramba, is blessed with a mesmerising, intuitive resonance that is borderline spectacular in places. The lengthy Living It Up was the centrepiece of the show, and it saw the trio almost play musical chairs throughout, with Jones moving from piano to drums, Cole from drums to keyboard and Maramba sawing away at his bass with a bow. Fusing rhythm and blues with jazz, it was one of those rare live moments which deserves the term electrifying. Otherwise, Jones's singular voice carried the occasion, a high-pitched and hopeful holler which sounds fragile to the point of breaking at any moment. She sang in praise of her daughter on Wild Girl ("if I can't give her advice, at least I can give her a song"), in tribute to her father with The Moon is Made of Gold, a song he wrote, and of beautiful, pained romance and nostalgia on Bonfires and On Saturday Afternoons in 1963, respectively. The closing Chuck E's in Love naturally earned much applause, but her biggest hit still didn't steal this memorable show.

G

You would love the Le Poisson Rouge gigs.

3 exceptional gigs.

Maybe one day she will decide to release them

 

 

MDS posted:

Having mentioned on here yesterday the merits of the second CD in this special edition, I thought I'd remind myself how good it is. Five songs from one of her concerts in Paris. Lovely. Now looking forward to her forthcoming Live In Europe album.

BTW imgur is now behaving again  

Would have loved to have seen Preacherman on it as for me that was a highlight of the tour.

ewemon posted:
MDS posted:

 

Having mentioned on here yesterday the merits of the second CD in this special edition, I thought I'd remind myself how good it is. Five songs from one of her concerts in Paris. Lovely. Now looking forward to her forthcoming Live In Europe album.

BTW imgur is now behaving again  

Would have loved to have seen Preacherman on it as for me that was a highlight of the tour.

I saw her perform most of the Currency of Man album at the Royal Festival Hall last year and she included Preacherman. Yes it was fabulous.  I've also got the Blueray of Live In Paris and that's good too.  Gives the HT system a thorough workout. 

nigelb posted:

Kandace Springs - Soul Eyes

One of my albums of the year. What a talent!

Thanks to Tony for bringing this lady to my attention.

Funny enough I was watching the title song video  on that  “tube” thing this afternoon. Glad you’re still enjoying the album,  Nigel.

Happy New Year!

Now Playing......

Boz Scaggs - Speak Low

Boz Scaggs - Speak Low

Streaming on TIDAL......   Something smooth and low key on a Saturday night. Lovely.........

Note on TIDAL:  From his late 1960s days as the lead singer of the Steve Miller Band, Boz Scaggs has always had an undercurrent of jazz influence in his phrasing. Therefore, SPEAK LOW should come as no surprise to longtime fans. No mere raid on the Great American Songbook in the manner of Rod Stewart's adult contemporary albums, SPEAK LOW is a personal, canny follow-up to 2003's collection of standards, BUT BEAUTIFUL. These 12 tracks offer less familiar tracks like Duke Ellington's "Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me" and Chet Baker's "She Was Too Good To Me," given abstract, cerebral arrangements in the manner of 1950s Gil Evans charts.

The Black Crowes. The Southern Harmony & Musical Companion. On original CD from 1992. Hearty, gritty, and original southern rock with a down and dirty blues infusion. Not sure how this band escaped my listening until the past few years, now happily making up for lost time.

sjust posted:
dave4jazz posted:
Bert Schurink posted:

To switch after enjoying it to the last trio album, ...

It's been four years since a recorded peep has been heard from pianist Keith Jarrett's Standards Trio, despite continuing to perform a few select dates each year. But even its last few ECM releases—2009's Yesterdays, 2007's My Foolish Heart and 2004's The Out-of-Towners—were all culled from a clearly fruitful 2001, making it well over a decade since a new recorded note has been heard from Jarrett's longest-lasting group. Fine albums all, the dearth of anything since that time has nevertheless begged the question, even amongst some of his most ardent fans, as to whether this undeniably fine trio had anything new to say.

From Jarrett's a cappella opening to Somewhere's wonderfully coalescing take of trumpeter Miles Davis' "Solar," all doubts are laid to rest as the pianist delivers a performance to rival his classic introduction to "My Funny Valentine" on Still Live (ECM, 1988), one of the Standards Trio's strongest records. It's a terrific start to an album that, recorded in Switzerland during the summer of 2009, celebrates 30 years since Jarrett, bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette first entered New York's Power Station studio for the fruitful sessions that yielded three recordings collected on Setting Standards: New York Sessions (ECM, 2008): Standards, Vol. 1 (1983), Changes (1984) and Standards, Vol. 2 (1985).

It's been a long time since the trio has stepped into a studio, and the easiest explanation is that this really is a group best heard live—a point driven home by this 65-minute, six-song set. In addition to Davis, the trio works its way through a list of equally classic songwriters. A particularly lovely take of Frank Perkins and Mitchell Parish's "Stars Fell on Alabama," finds Peacock, combining pure taste and tone, remaining at the top of his game. A quirky rendition of Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea" is largely constructed around this trio's remarkable ability to suggest swing without actually playing it—the entire structure ready to collapse at any moment like a house of cards—but never actually doing so—even as DeJohnette takes his only real solo of the set, while Jimmy van Heusen and Johnny Mercer's balladic "I Thought About You" closes the set on an irrepressibly romantic note predicated on the trio's egalitarian nature.

But it's Leonard Bernstein's two classics from the 1957 musical West Side Story that form Somewhere's centerpiece. A profoundly beautiful take on "Somewhere" leads to Jarrett's lengthy coda, "Everywhere," building this nearly 20-minute workout to a powerful climax, ultimately winding down to a gospel-tinged conclusion, while "Tonight" is taken at an unexpectedly bright clip. Peacock and DeJohnette swing more directly this time, with Jarrett's effortless motivic invention keeping secure his position in the upper echelon of improvising pianists.

Despite the 12-year gap since its last recorded work, Somewhere leaves no doubt that the special spark Jarrett, Peacock and DeJohnette first demonstrated on the bassist's Tales of Another (ECM, 1977) remains intact. If anything, Somewhere creates hope that another four years won't have to pass before this inimitable trio is heard from again.

Sadly in 2015 Keith Jarrett is quoted, at KeithJarrett.org, saying “I don’t have a trio now so… all I know is that I’m not going to look for other guys who I would need 30 years to get as good as we got, that’s the biggest problem of all. How much rapport and understanding we had, it’s unmatched anywhere I think.”

Dave

Let’s also get familiar with the thought that these brave men have grown old, now, and there may not be plenty of new material from them, any more. I trust Manfred Eicher, though, that he has many unpublished recordings in his drawer, so there is hope...

New trio album, After The Fall, to be released in March 2018

ECM will soon release a new trio album with Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette, entitled After The Fall. It will be a 2-CD album and is currently listed on Amazon and other online retailers with a release date of March 2, 2018. Nothing more is known about this release at the moment.

 

Posted: 30 Dec 2017 07:31 AM PST

 

KeithJarrett.org

 

Dave

joerand posted:

Nirvana. Live At Reading. On CD from 2009. From their 1992 concert. For pure musical drive and raw energy, this is a crazy-good performance and my favorite live recording. It'll leave you sweating.

We watched MTV Unplugged again over Christmas and I was amazed again and was left feeling really sad again.

Tony2011 posted:
nigelb posted:

Kandace Springs - Soul Eyes

One of my albums of the year. What a talent!

Thanks to Tony for bringing this lady to my attention.

Funny enough I was watching the title song video  on that  “tube” thing this afternoon. Glad you’re still enjoying the album,  Nigel.

Happy New Year!

I am very careful not to over-listen to this for fear of becoming bored with it but in reality there is little chance of that. I'll have to investigate this tube thingy and see Kandace on that, whatever it is!

Happy New Year to you too and please keep posting those new finds! 

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