What are you listening to and WHY might anyone be interested? (Vol. XIV)

Stevee_S posted:
ewemon posted:
Stevee_S posted:
ewemon posted:

Possibly one of the best British blues albums ever made. Fabulous

 

That's a huge recommendation, cheers Ewen. 

Mike Vernon also thought they were an outstanding band as he originally signed them to Code Records. All you need to do with this album is take their singer out and put in BB King and you would swear it was a BB King album mind you apart from one track all of them were recorded by the King. It would probably be up there in the Top 20 BB KIng albums maybe even the Top 10. I personally think it is that good.

 

This is a tough album to buy, I've tried Amazon, Discogs and bandcamp without even seeing them. 

Similar problem here, I’ve ordered Sound Like This from the river instead as it looks like the same band, and thanks Ewen for the recommendation. 

Eoink posted:
Stevee_S posted:
ewemon posted:
Stevee_S posted:
ewemon posted:

Possibly one of the best British blues albums ever made. Fabulous

 

That's a huge recommendation, cheers Ewen. 

Mike Vernon also thought they were an outstanding band as he originally signed them to Code Records. All you need to do with this album is take their singer out and put in BB King and you would swear it was a BB King album mind you apart from one track all of them were recorded by the King. It would probably be up there in the Top 20 BB KIng albums maybe even the Top 10. I personally think it is that good.

 

This is a tough album to buy, I've tried Amazon, Discogs and bandcamp without even seeing them. 

Similar problem here, I’ve ordered Sound Like This from the river instead as it looks like the same band, and thanks Ewen for the recommendation. 

It is the same band and IMHO Sound Like this is a fgood album as well. Hope you enjoy it.

Now Playing........

Johanna Johannsson - And In The Endless Pause There Came The Sound Of Bees

Johanna Johannsson - And In The Endless Pause There Came The Sound Of Bees

Streaming on TIDAL.......... In another thread there was mention of Johanna Johannsson passing. I had never listened to anything by him and the mention of the album named "And In The Endless Pause There Came The Sound Of Bees" fascinated me and needed to take it out for a spin. Four tracks in and enjoying the music, very pleasant and moody.

Stevee_S posted:

(1997)

Air - Premiers Symptomes 

A seven CD album pressed in France for the UK market, originally released in 1997 compiling the French duos single releases between 1995-97 this one however has a couple of bonus tracks Californie and Brakes On.

*Edit - My typing error: This was a seven track CD album not "a seven CD album" as I typed yesterday!

Now Playing........

Johanna Johannsson - Fordlandia

Johanna Johannsson - Fordandia

Streaming on TIDAL.......... I played one of Johanna Johannsson albums, "And In The Endless Pause There Came The Sound Of Bees," late yesterday and enjoyed it quite a bit, beautiful album. So I am starting out the day giving "Fordandia" a spin......    Opening track suits the early morning perfectly!

Russell Malone - Black butterfly

This is an early album of Russell Malone (his second one). It is a good one imo. It's mainstream jazz. He doesn't just play the usual standards. He also included some composition of his own.

  • Russell Malone - Guitar
  • Gary Motley - piano
  • Paul Keller - bass
  • Peter Siers - drums
  • Steve Nelson - vibes (on two tracks)

Brahms & Dvořák:  The Z.E.N. Trio - Zhang Zuo (piano) | Esther Yoo (violin) | Narek Hakhnazaryan (cello)

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897):  Piano Trio in B Op. 8 (revised version)
Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904)  Piano Trio Op. 90 'Dumky'

The Z.E.N. came about several years ago as each were BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artists.  The ZEN part is simply an acronym for the three artists' initials.  The sound and approach is fresh and this trio gets high marks from me.   I look forward to hearing what's next from them.

Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849):  Nino Gvetadze (piano)

Preludes Op. 28
Etude in e-flat minor op. 10, No. 6
Waltz in A-flat major Op. 69, No. 1 & b-minor Op. 69, No. 2
Waltz in b-minor Op. 34, No. 2
Scherzo No. 2 in b-flat minor Op. 31

Ghosts.  In the artistic sense Nino Gvetadze is referring to the whole idea of looking at our past through the faint images of our minds eye.  We see all sorts of memories, doubts, hopes, love, admiration, loneliness, pain and despair.  We contemplate the meaning of it all to us and yet we know there is no turning back.  I believe that if you understand the sense of nostalgia and the image of replaying the past in slow motion you will be on the road to understanding the music of Chopin.

I categorically denounce this trend today to un-romanticize Chopin and turn him into the Terminator.  Another way to say this is many today want a masculine (loud, strong, and tactless - like Beethoven's evil twin brother) Chopin who might laugh as he pokes you in the eye and steals your lunch.  Nothing could be further from the truth - at least in my little world. 

Like his b-flat minor sonata (representing life & death) the Preludes are an episodic, autobiographical look a life looking backwards at it.  In this case, we can assume his own.  There is happiness as well as sadness.  There is life as well as death.  

Gvetadze's playing either reminds me of my earliest impressions of Chopin as I listened to recordings as a child or really reflects my personality and character.  Not sure which or maybe both?  There is no syrupy playing here (the ugly definition of romanticism) and there is no bombastic, masculine loudness, banging and unnecessary speediness.  Whew!   because these are the two examples of the worst kind of Chopin interpretations.  Instead this is something closer to just letting the music speak for itself.  Along with a certain softness you get the feeling that you are looking at sepia toned daguerreotype photos of your life. 

Nothing is really forced or overcooked so for example you might expect your Agitato's to be more agitated or your fortissimo's louder but they typically are not.  An example of the latter is the c-minor (Largo) which often gets interpreted with big boomy chords and I am happy to hear it with the middle and ending lines in a true piano and pianissimo.

The disc ends with an Etude, three Waltzes and the b-flat minor Scherzo.  The Etude and the Waltzes just happen to be some of the saddest, nostalgic Chopin around and yet Gvetadze restrains herself by keeping everything consistently even keeled. 

The piano (a Steinway) and the recording are of excellent quality here.  Despite the odd little thing that I would play differently here or there I really like this album.  One of the best for me in many ways and close to ideal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcJu-oDdac8

Richard Thompson - Still, 3 LP 45rpm version of the deluxe CD.

This arrived today, RT’s 2015 Still album with the 5 bonus tracks added, classic Thompson, clever songs, some caustic numbers, masterful guitar playing supported by a great band, I’ve enjoyed this album since the CDs dropped through the letterbox on launch day, excellent SQ from this vinyl edition. 

Stevee_S posted:

Ozric Tentacles - Paper Monkeys

(2011)

I've not listened to any modern Ozric's for quite a while preferring their original and early albums but this one stands up pretty well. 

Having been awakened to the Ozrics recently, I find it quite an exciting prospect to explore their massive back catalogue. New stuff, old stuff and stuff in between!

Clive B posted:
Stevee_S posted:

Ozric Tentacles - Paper Monkeys

(2011)

I've not listened to any modern Ozric's for quite a while preferring their original and early albums but this one stands up pretty well. 

Having been awakened to the Ozrics recently, I find it quite an exciting prospect to explore their massive back catalogue. New stuff, old stuff and stuff in between!

Go for it Clive it will be a good journey, none of their material is bad it's just that most are way better than one or two others. 

Cheers 

Steve 

Russell Malone - Look who's here.

Another good one from Russell Malone.

Allmusic.com:

A Wes Montgomery for the new millennium, this flashy yet honest hollow body guitarist captures all the exuberance and intimacy of the legend in the '60s, but with a certain modern attitude that makes this contemporary rather than just retro jazz. He and his quartet (pianist Anthony Wonsey, bassist Richie Goods, drummer Byron Landham) swing hard and high on the staccato punches of "The Angle," then smooth out just a bit for the heavy swaying blues of "Look Who's Here" (both Malone Originals). Malone has an amazing chemistry with Wonsey in particular, as their unique call and response, melody and harmony interplay on an upbeat twist on "The Odd Couple" makes abundantly clear. The best kinds of jazz albums feature a healthy mix of hard grooving jam sessions with plenty of improvisation, along with a few more intimate treasures. While there's a tender intimacy between guitar and steady percussion on Stevie Wonder's romantic "You Will Know," Malone's gentlest graces are saved for the sweet and wistful turn on Lerner and Loewe's "The Heather on the Hill." Before long, however, he's moving to the up groover category on "An Affair to Remember," which finds a happy medium between the exciting madness of the first few tracks and the eloquence of the ballads. With capable young lions like Malone on the scene, traditional jazz will stay healthy through the first years of the new century.

seakayaker posted:

Now Playing........

Johanna Johannsson - Fordlandia

Johanna Johannsson - Fordandia

Streaming on TIDAL.......... I played one of Johanna Johannsson albums, "And In The Endless Pause There Came The Sound Of Bees," late yesterday and enjoyed it quite a bit, beautiful album. So I am starting out the day giving "Fordandia" a spin......    Opening track suits the early morning perfectly!

I bought this album earlier this year and like it a lot.  It reminds me a little bit of works by Arvo Part and Craig Armstrong.

LP - Quarterstick Records 2008 : )

  • Joey Burns – vocals, guitars, bass, cello, keyboards, accordion, percussion, vibraphone
  • John Convertino – drums, percussion, piano
  • Paul Niehaus – steel guitar, guitars
  • Jacob Valenzuela – trumpet, keyboards, vibraphone, vocals
  • Martin Wenk – trumpet, guitar, keyboards, accordion, glockenspiel, vibraphone (occasionally harmonica & French horn)
  • Volker Zander – standup bass, electric bass

 

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