What book are you reading right now?

quote:
Originally posted by GFFJ:

Dear Mark,

This is a link to the original thread! Long since locked through being inactive for too long!

ATB from George


I didn't think it was that far back, George!

I can't believe it dropped of the radar. All the more reason for the revival!
There was another that I started of the same name which came after that one dropped away [which I could not find], which also ran for long while, but the subject needs feeding the occasional post from the starter. Your job, now - once a month - to post something interesting on it, dear Mark!

ATB from George

PS: Gordon started it! It was a long time ago!
quote:
Originally posted by winkyincanada:
Yes, a ripping yarn. Try also Moneyball and Liar's Poker.


I am going to. The Big Short is his only book I read so far. I heard that Lewis did some interesting writing about football and baseball (which I am not interested in). Who knows? some day he may decide to write about crude oil trading...
quote:
Originally posted by Haim Ronen:
quote:
Originally posted by winkyincanada:
Yes, a ripping yarn. Try also Moneyball and Liar's Poker.


I am going to. The Big Short is his only book I read so far. I heard that Lewis did some interesting writing about football and baseball (which I am not interested in). Who knows? some day he may decide to write about crude oil trading...


Moneyball isn't really about baseball, and Blind Side isn't really about football; although he uses those sports as a backdrop.

And yes, Lewis' take on commodities trading would be potentially interesting.


This is part 3 in the series. It and part two (God Emperor of Didcot) were pretty enjoyable in a 'Carry On Up Uranus' kinda way. The first book wasn't all that IMO, clearly finding his feet and abit patchy but the last two are funny, easy reading stuff. You need the first one though just to get everyone introduced.

If you don't like childish, bodily function gags, you won't like this. However, if you like a good knob joke...

Did make me laugh.
On my recent holiday Charles Dickens: David Copperfield. Magnificent.

I'm steadily working my way through all his books these last couple of years. My youthful impression of Dickens was dreadful Sunday teatime BBC2 adaptations with lots of ugly people and funny names but I find his books rich, funny, warm and full of soical compassion. A friend told me that everyone should read Dickens-could not agree more. Start with Great Expectations if you want a place to begin.

Bruce
nicnaim
I read this a little while ago on a recommendation from my father. It is fascinating. I was astonished how tribal/fuedal areas he passed through were and how desolate they were. And that maybe, is part of the reason that they remain so fuedal. There is so little there to eke out any living nevermind society on, it seems to have resulted in such a rigid and authoritarian social structure.

a very worthwhile read.
atb
james
quote:
Originally posted by Bruce Woodhouse:
On my recent holiday Charles Dickens: David Copperfield. Magnificent.

I'm steadily working my way through all his books these last couple of years. My youthful impression of Dickens was dreadful Sunday teatime BBC2 adaptations with lots of ugly people and funny names but I find his books rich, funny, warm and full of soical compassion. A friend told me that everyone should read Dickens-could not agree more. Start with Great Expectations if you want a place to begin.

Bruce

Hi Bruce.

I always meant to read Dickens, like you last time was at school.

Your post has forced my hand at last, I'll get one to start at random on Saturday.

Cheers, Paul.


A very interesting book on a subject I had only limited knowledge of.

I had no idea how much in the way of Allied resources Vichy took up on so many fronts. Gotta say, The French do not come out of it very well and it does not endear The Nation to the reader at all. However, I'm left with the impression that 'we' learned an awful lot about modern warfare in our engagements with them, particularly over decision making, which helped enormously in later battles with the stronger axis forces.

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