What book are you reading right now?

"Winston's War, Churchill 1940-1945" by Max Hastings

Aside from the fact that Max Hastings is a wonderful writer and historian you'd think there wasn't much new to cover here. You'd be wrong. Yes, the ground has been covered before, but the insights here make it a hard book to put down.
quote:
Originally posted by Clay Bingham:
"Winston's War, Churchill 1940-1945" by Max Hastings

Aside from the fact that Max Hastings is a wonderful writer and historian you'd think there wasn't much new to cover here. You'd be wrong. Yes, the ground has been covered before, but the insights here make it a hard book to put down.


Clay,

I heard last month Max Hastings in Chicago give a very good talk about his newest Churchill book. I read five of his books this year: Warriors, The Korean War, The Battle for the Falklands, Armageddon and Bomber Command.

Haim
Haim

I would have enjoyed hearing that interview. CSPAN used to do such interviews on a program called Booknotes which was superb. Emphasis was on authors of history and politics. You've got me on numbers of books. I've read Armageddon, Retribution, and now working on Churchill. Don't miss Retribution. Its portrayal of the end of the Pacific war is haunting and disturbing. Agree with the decision or not, you will understand in stark terms the logic behind the use of those two atom bombs.
Thanks for the recommendation, Clay. I will try to get Retribution down the road. I read too many Hastings in a row and I need a break from history books. I try to alternate between fictions and non-fictions.I am enjoying a lot now the short stories collection of T. C. Boyle.

By the way, Hastings talk was taped at the Pritzker Military Library. Perhaps you can obtain a DVD from them:

http://www.pritzkermilitarylib...bout/board-tracy.jsp
Continuing my habit of reading children's books ...

"The Ratastrophe Catastrophe" by David Lee Stone.

Bought it on recommendation from an ex-colleague who said "if you like Terry Pratchett you'll love this". BORING. Half-way through it and now speedreading just to see how it ends. Tries very hard to be funny, but the humour is puerile and very obvious. Won't be buying any more of his books.
quote:
Originally posted by Clay Bingham:
Haim

Thanks for the link. Interesting site. The last three fiction books have been "The Double Comfort Safari Club", Wolf Hall, and The Man from Beijing, all enjoyable.

Clay


Clay,

My friend who came with me to hear Hastings and is reading his Churchill book now says that the introduction in the book is almost identical to his speech so perhaps you shouldn't bother with the DVD.

If you enjoy Hastings you should read Rick Atkinson whom I heard at the same library:

http://www.liberationtrilogy.com/

He won the Pulitzer Prize for Army At Dawn.
The Weeping Goldsmith :discoveries in the secret land of Myanmar


John Kress, he is curator at Smithsonian Botanist and specializes in wild gingers,tho also heliconias and bananas . I heard him talk and bought the book. great pictures of Burma and had 5 trips. All about the environment, politics of gov't forestry, collecting, and the people. A travelog I could never do and the country is now closed off. A short talk with him was great fun during the signing.

quote:
Originally posted by nicnaim:
Having originally seen and really enjoyed the film of the first installment of the Millenium Trilogy, I thought that I would read the books books. I found that I could not put them down, and read all three in a week.

Regards

Nic






Just bought the first one today. It was on a shelf whilst I was waiting to pay for two cd's.

Looking forward to it, hope it's as good as the hype.
quote:
Originally posted by nicnaim:
Having originally seen and really enjoyed the film of the first installment of the Millenium Trilogy, I thought that I would read the books books. I found that I could not put them down, and read all three in a week.

Regards

Nic





Unputdownable now there is a word if it is a word you don't hear everyday!
quote:
Originally posted by ROTF:
Charles Hughes, The Winning Formula: The Football Association Soccer Skills and Tactics (1990)

What a great book - surely a must-read for all potential England managers.


It's a route one should take if one has serious aspirations towards football management.
quote:
Originally posted by ianmacd:
quote:
Originally posted by munch:
Got to the end of this today with my 5 year old son.

Such a good book.


Such a pile of shite (to use one of your favourite adjectives.)

Ian
My 5 year old son loves it.
We did the whole lord of the rings first.
My 28 year old son loves them as does my 25 year old daughter.
Do you read to your children at bed time?
quote:
Originally posted by nicnaim:
Having originally seen and really enjoyed the film of the first installment of the Millenium Trilogy, I thought that I would read the books books. I found that I could not put them down, and read all three in a week.

Regards

Nic




I'm currently rushing through the first, with the other two waiting in the wings.

Great reading so far!
As Mrs Lutyens who never reads couldn't put the first one down until the end, I have read just finished the first one and am waiting for her to complete the second so I can start that. (We have two copies of the third, so no problem there!). It was a really good read and Mrs Lutyens tells me No:2 is even better! I am astonished at the bizzareness of the baddies in these books but real life follows on very quickly...........think Austria/basements etc. I did give up reading patricia cornwall who seemed to just concentrate on the gore. Fortunately Larsson doesn't.
As to the translation, translation is always a difficult issue but yes some of it was a little 'loose'....'goalbird'? That said a friend who works in publishing says that it is quite often the case that a 'mistake' is placed in a book so that they can track fake copies from around the world.....so who knows 'goalbird' may be one of those.
Anyway, can't wait to start number 2.
atb
james
That set is next on my reading list - on the recommendation of my daughters.

Currently just finishing "City Of Glass", 3rd volume of "The Mortal Instruments" by Cassandra Clare. I was given the first by daughter #2 and my first thought was "more teenage vampire type stuff". Actually it turned out to be excellent and I rapidly ordered vols 2 and 3. Highly recommended. Much better than the Stephanie Meyer stuff IMO.

Also - try Jim Butcher's Dresden Files series. Not too deep and great fun.
In the middle of 'The Rose Labyrinth' by Tatiana Hardie. Very good read if you like modern hidden religious sects on a mad rush to bring on the end of the world. You know - Dan Brown kind of thing.

Recently finished Jim Butcher's 'Turn Coat'. I love this series. Great if you're into modern day wizards keeping things under wraps while all hell is literally trying to break loose. Very readable.


I'm halfway through the third Harry Potter book, The Prisoner of Azkaban, fast on the heels of reading its predecessors, The Sorcerer's Stone and The Chamber of Secrets.

My daughter is almost 11, and is already on the seventh and last installment, The Deathly Hallows. She has been lobbying me to read them, so I plunged in recently and I can't put them down ... some of the best pure fiction I've ever read, and definitely not just for children. Absolutely brilliant writing.

Whether you have young kids or not, if you haven't read these, I give my highest recommendation.



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