What book are you reading right now?

Minh Nguyen posted:

How much have you read? Initial thoughts? Full review?

I've read about a quarter or a third so far. The author is EP's grandson so he has a lot of affection for, and knowledge of, the man. The book is confirming something that I have long suspected - P&P's pictures were products of a profoundly English imagination. They couldn't been made anywhere else but this country. Powell was from Kent, so that makes sense; but what of Pressberger, the Hungarian Jew exiled to these islands? Of course, as an outsider with an all-seeing outsider's eye, he perhaps understood the English/British better than they understood themselves. This is one of the things that gives his scripts such richness.

I am enjoying the book very much, it's very insightful; but then again I am a complete sucker for Michael Powell, P&P and anything to do with them so I kind of knew I'd enjoy the tome even before I started it.

Kevin-W posted:
Minh Nguyen posted:

How much have you read? Initial thoughts? Full review?

I've read about a quarter or a third so far. The author is EP's grandson so he has a lot of affection for, and knowledge of, the man. The book is confirming something that I have long suspected - P&P's pictures were products of a profoundly English imagination. They couldn't been made anywhere else but this country. Powell was from Kent, so that makes sense; but what of Pressberger, the Hungarian Jew exiled to these islands? Of course, as an outsider with an all-seeing outsider's eye, he perhaps understood the English/British better than they understood themselves. This is one of the things that gives his scripts such richness.

I am enjoying the book very much, it's very insightful; but then again I am a complete sucker for Michael Powell, P&P and anything to do with them so I kind of knew I'd enjoy the tome even before I started it.

Sounds interesting. I would much appreciate your synopsis when you finish reading.

I've just finished reading Frederic Manning's Her Privates We.

A brilliant yet sobering account of a soldiers life during the battle of the Somme.

The world changed markedly thanks to the Great War, and my own perspective on life has undoubtedly changed having read this remarkable book. Totally humbling. 

Tara Westover  -  "Educated, A Memoir"  (2018)  written by a lady who was raised in a Mormon survivalist family in the deep woods of Idaho.  Received no education or schooling until she was 18 yoa and went on to graduate college, receive scholarships to Cambridge and complete PhD level education.  And subsequent reflections on the entire journey.

Nick, have you read any of Ben MacIntyre's books? Very much in the same improbable-but-true boys' own vein. If you like the Milton book you'll  love Agent Zigzag: The True Wartime Story of Eddie Chapman: Lover, Betrayer, Hero, Spy; Operation Mincemeat; Kim Philby: His Most Intimate Betrayal; and Double Cross - The True Story of the D Day Spies.

Makes great TV shows out of his books too.

Kevin-W posted:

Nick, have you read any of Ben MacIntyre's books? Very much in the same improbable-but-true boys' own vein. If you like the Milton book you'll  love Agent Zigzag: The True Wartime Story of Eddie Chapman: Lover, Betrayer, Hero, Spy; Operation Mincemeat; Kim Philby: His Most Intimate Betrayal; and Double Cross - The True Story of the D Day Spies.

Makes great TV shows out of his books too.

Top tips - will check these out - thanks!

 Scandinavia's greatest film-maker, Carl Theodor Dreyer was responsible for a string of austere masterpieces between the 1910s and 1960s, including Day of Wrath, Ordet, The Passion of Joan of Arc, Gertrud and Mikael.

This is - surprisingly, given his reputation as a great master of cinema, especially among cineasts here in Blighty - the first English language biography of the great man. It includes a lot of personal correspondence. A really interesting insight into the man and his work.

mpw posted:

Finished reading - Siddhartha by Herman Hesse

A wonderful book that takes you within....

do look up about the book and the subject matter on the net..

worth your time..

Ah, I read that when still at school, and several times more during my college days and again through my 20s, it was extremely influential on me. I did reread the Glass Bead Game a year or so back for the first time in many years, I loved it as much as I did in my younger days, must read Siddhartha again, thanks for the prompt.

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