What Booze are you drinking now?

Stevee_S posted:
kuma posted:
Bob Edwards posted:

Macallan 18.

Yummy.  I have to thank Linn for the introduction - I took part in a week and half of training at the factory and one of the nights was invested in a single-malt tasting. 

It is my fave but I am currently out of it.

My favourite too and still 3 bottles left from the Christmas case. 

Here, Macallan 18 is $200.  Macallan 12 is $44.  Macallan 25 is $999.

I enjoy aged whisky almost as much as anyone, but the prices of Macallan have gotten out of hand.  The last bottle of Macallan I bought is the 12 yr old.   

 

Stevee_S posted:
kuma posted:
Bob Edwards posted:

Macallan 18.

Yummy.  I have to thank Linn for the introduction - I took part in a week and half of training at the factory and one of the nights was invested in a single-malt tasting. 

It is my fave but I am currently out of it.

My favourite too and still 3 bottles left from the Christmas case. 

Suuuuure!

If you've got it, flaunt it!

Bart posted:

Here, Macallan 18 is $200.  Macallan 12 is $44.  Macallan 25 is $999. I enjoy aged whisky almost as much as anyone, but the prices of Macallan have gotten out of hand.  The last bottle of Macallan I bought is the 12 yr old.  

The last time I checked, Macallan 18 was over 250USD! /bottle. ( it's overvalued like current stock market! )

Retail prices for Scotch have gone up steadily during the past decade while, during the same period, prices from the Scotch Malt Whisky Society have risen only slightly, barely keeping pace with inflation. When you consider that the latter whiskies are cask strength – you get 50% more whisky for your money – they start to look like a positive bargain.

Granted, the annual membership is $229, but you get 3 100ml. bottles thrown in, and renewals are $70. If you buy a bottle of Scotch a year, and are a little adventurous – they only have “anonymised” bottles from single casks - it’s worth considering. The bottles make great business gifts, although the IRS won’t let me deduct them

kuma posted:
Stevee_S posted:
 

It is my fave but I am currently out of it.

My favourite too and still 3 bottles left from the Christmas case. 

Suuuuure!

If you've got it, flaunt it!

 

 

 

 

My apologies Kuma, I had no intention of flaunting. I should have put my comment in context. One of my oldest friends had a large windfall last year and extremely generously shared part of it amongst his friends at Christmas time with cases of fine wine, cognac and whiskies. Unfortunately there is no way I would be ordering a £2,500 case of my favourite single malt, I was just one of the lucky beneficiaries of a good friend's generosity.

Corry posted:

Retail prices for Scotch have gone up steadily during the past decade while, during the same period, prices from the Scotch Malt Whisky Society have risen only slightly, barely keeping pace with inflation. When you consider that the latter whiskies are cask strength – you get 50% more whisky for your money – they start to look like a positive bargain.

Granted, the annual membership is $229, but you get 3 100ml. bottles thrown in, and renewals are $70. If you buy a bottle of Scotch a year, and are a little adventurous – they only have “anonymised” bottles from single casks - it’s worth considering. The bottles make great business gifts, although the IRS won’t let me deduct them

Thanks for this -- the Scotch Malt Whisky Society looks interesting.  I don't buy / drink all that much whisky, and if I avoid Macallan there are always a variety of 17 or so yr old bottles available at 'more' reasonable prices.  And I'm not quite sure how I feel about the anonymised feature!

The anonymised feature (as I call it) is a quirk that arose because of the relationship between the various distilleries and the Society. As I understand it, the distilleries had concerns about their whiskies appearing under others’ labels, and so the solution was to require that all mention of the distillery be removed from the label, and replaced with a code number. So if you bought a bottle with the number 29.45, that would be a bottling from the 45th cask supplied by distillery no. 29, which happens to be Laphroaig.

The anonymisation is very weak. Here’s a list of the distilleries:

http://www.whiskyportal.com/smws/ 

It can be fun to get the lists they send out, and try to guess the distillery from the tasting notes though after a while you start to memorise some of the numbers, especially as some distilleries (Glenfarclas, Caol Ila, etc.) seem to supply many more casks than others. Another plus is that the bottle designs are really cool:

Scotch Malt Whisky Society bottle

Corry,

Thanks for the heads up on the Whisky Society.  It's interesting and I might give it a try after I gain broader experience with more variety albeit I am not sure about the cheezy title they put on each bottle. I see someone is having fun.

so were these memebership kit 100ml bottles any good?

The eccentric tasting notes are all part of the experience, e.g.

Water brings up the European wood character, which in this case might be summed up as the aroma of a vintage motor-car - old rubber, polished leather, a hint of exhaust fumes.

… this sample noses like an entire dinner - smoked fish to start, roast lamb or glazed ham providing the meat, followed by knickerbocker glory or butterscotch fudge sundae and an empty fag packet by the embers of a dying fire to round it off.

The taste remains consistent also, with a lively light saltiness on the tongue. One panel member described it as "like being trapped in a car after a wet walk with a dog".

Regarding the introductory bottles: Back when I joined (1996-ish, just after the US branch started up), you got a single 750ml. bottle, of their choosing, although they were happy to substitute any currently available bottle in the same price range. This suited me, as I had a fixation on the Craigellachie distillery, having been transported by a glass of the stuff a few years previously when I lived in England.

But I think the 3 x 100ml. bottles is a better idea overall, as it allows you to ease your way into the whole experience, reduces the risk of dissatisfaction, and will give you an eye-opening sense of the range of flavours available from the different regions. The three distilleries in the photo above are Bowmore (#3), Glen Grant (#9), and Isle of Arran (#121), i.e. Islay, Highland/Speyside, and Island respectively, which looks like a good selection.

Corry posted:

The eccentric tasting notes are all part of the experience, e.g.

Water brings up the European wood character, which in this case might be summed up as the aroma of a vintage motor-car - old rubber, polished leather, a hint of exhaust fumes.

… this sample noses like an entire dinner - smoked fish to start, roast lamb or glazed ham providing the meat, followed by knickerbocker glory or butterscotch fudge sundae and an empty fag packet by the embers of a dying fire to round it off.

The taste remains consistent also, with a lively light saltiness on the tongue. One panel member described it as "like being trapped in a car after a wet walk with a dog".

I love those creative notes.

Noone write like that any more.

Adam Zielinski posted:
Kevin-W posted:

A drop of the old Japanese stuff...

Perfect Harmony II

A seriously good whisky! One of my favourite as a matter of fact... I need a glass now

It must be good stuff.

Kevin’s only had a drop and he appears not to be able to stand up straight.

 

fatcat posted:
Adam Zielinski posted:
Kevin-W posted:

A drop of the old Japanese stuff...

Perfect Harmony II

A seriously good whisky! One of my favourite as a matter of fact... I need a glass now

It must be good stuff.

Kevin’s only had a drop and he appears not to be able to stand up straight.

 

Just had a sip, whilst sitting down and listening to Hugh Laurie's 'Didn't It Rain'...

Cannot stand up straight either 

Adam Zielinski posted:

Just had a sip, whilst sitting down and listening to Hugh Laurie's 'Didn't It Rain'...

Cannot stand up straight either 

That reminds me of a cleaner we had at work about 15 years ago, she was about 65, lovely woman, but being a Geordie she was terribly foul mouthed and a heavy drinker. One Christmas I bought her a 4 pack of Carlsberg Special brew. When I saw her in the New Year I asked if she’d enjoyed them. She said yes, she’d drunk 4 cans while watching the TV, got up to go to bed at 12, fell over and couldn’t get up off the floor until 5 in the morning.

Sloop John B posted:

 The very very best stout in the world (probably)

SJB

'O’Hara’s Leann Folláin at 6.0% abv is laden with complex chocolate and coffee flavours balanced by a robust bitterness and delicate spicy aroma imparted from the generous portions of Northdown and Fuggle Hops.'

Sounds interesting! I must try it some times.

kuma posted:

Another Jim Beam brand Bourbon: Basil Hayden's.

Compared to Booker's smooth and sweeter goes down much easier but not as complex or interesting.

Incidentally, I was not aware Jim Beam has been bought by Suntory.

Booker Noe, grandson of the legendary Jim Beam, created The Small Batch Collection and in doing so is credited with establishing the category of super-premium bourbons. Booker took great care in crafting his bourbon, and the Booker’s Bourbon bottle even features a label written in Booker Noe’s own handwriting. If you look closely, you will actually notice a small error.

Ordered a glass of the most expensive bourbon on hand, at the Dirty Dog Cafe, nice place live jazz entertainment. Sweet and Smooth, it is, had to double check, to make sure it was 40% alcohol by volume.

Sipping, this very moment, thought I would post a picture, since I didn't last week, when I posted.

But, I see, you've posted, and experienced, this smooth bourbon!

Allante93!

Simon-in-Suffolk posted:

Delivered to my house every other day and tastes superb neat or mixed with many things. Great in the morning - especially after having had other drinks the night before.

The Book Of Allante, Verse 1

 

Drink no longer only milk, and water, but use a little fine Boubon for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities.

I hear You, just once and a while! 

Allante93 posted:

Ordered a glass of the most expensive bourbon on hand, at the Dirty Dog Cafe, nice place live jazz entertainment. Sweet and Smooth, it is, had to double check, to make sure it was 40% alcohol by volume.

Sipping, this very moment, thought I would post a picture, since I didn't last week, when I posted.

But, I see, you've posted, and experienced, this smooth bourbon!

Allante, Have you tried other Jim Beam's Small Batch Burbon?

I have tried everything but the Baker's B7.

audio1946 posted:

adnams gin is a winner

I have never heard of it. I must try it sometime.
Last week I was sipping Bombay Sapphire gin & tonic with friends. Kevin-W's photo of Fever-Tree tonic above piqued my interest. 

Nice natural flavour. It really made a very nice difference in a simple drink like this.

On the subject of Adnams Gin, the company offers tours and make-your-own gin days. Going in a couple of weeks time, but having to drive, so tasting opportunities will be restricted. But we will come back with a couple of bottles to try out with friends, who are a bit partial to Martinis (of the very very dry variety).

kuma posted:
Allante93 posted:

 

Allante, Have you tried other Jim Beam's Small Batch Burbon?

I have tried everything but the Baker's B7.

Sorry for the late response, I see, not only are you are an aficionado of Hi-Fi!

But No, my health conditions does not allow me to partake in the manner I would like to.

But, with my first Name being shared, I couldn't resist.

The Basil Hayden, is remarkably smooth. I must be careful, I've consumed nearly a third of fifth, in a week! 

Eat, Drink And Be with Mary, if Lucky!

Also, from the Book Of Allante!

Enjoy!

Nick from Suffolk posted:

On the subject of Adnams Gin, the company offers tours and make-your-own gin days. Going in a couple of weeks time, but having to drive, so tasting opportunities will be restricted. But we will come back with a couple of bottles to try out with friends, who are a bit partial to Martinis (of the very very dry variety).

Nick,

That sounds great.
Curious to know how different is Adnams from familiar Beefeater or Bombay Sapphire?

I found that Gin is easy to get me *loopy* quicker than Whiskey and Bourbon variety!

To celebrate a very productive few hours of work (and Team GB's success in Rio today), I thought I would celebrate by treating myself to the greatest drink known to man: the Negroni - Campari, gin, vermouth, a splash of Angoustura Bitters, shaken and served over ice and a twist of orange. Heaven!

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