What Booze are you drinking now?

Generally I dislike the stuff intensely but my wife and friends like Bombay and Tankeray and drag us to pubs that specialise in gin.  The Fly on the Loaf in Liverpool has lots of interesting gins and some are fairly drinkable, fortunately they also sell beer and Bacardi that I much prefer.  I've just about mastered the gin fizz which easy to make and pretty impressive to serve to guests.

ChrisSU posted:

My experience of 'foreign' gin is even more limited, but I was recently given a bottle of Adirondack gin, 47%, and "created from the same base spirit as our Adirondack vodka." Then there was some spiel about bilberries. It didn't taste like any bilberry I've ever eaten. Neither did it taste like gin. I usually make a few bottles of sloe gin in the Autumn, but I'm not even sure I want to use it for that.

'Really good craft gins made in the UK' sound more interesting though, do tell......

Chris, all the best evidence points to gin being a Dutch (or perhaps French), rather than British, invention. Its popularity here dates roughly from the time of the reign of William and Mary. It became a scourge of the poor in the late 17th and most of the 18th century because it was cheap and easy to produce (much of the gin production in 18th century London was illegal and unlicensed, and many buildings were burned to the ground in distillation fires), and it numbed the pain of existence - the smack of its day, if you like.

The current mania for artisanal gins has its roots in what the food and drink industry calls "the desire for provenance". People are increasingly interested in where their food and drink comes from, and the stories behind it.

The trend for exotic gins was probably crated a decade and a half ago, by Hendrick's. This gin uses cucumber and rose in addition to the usual botanicals and has been made in Scotland by William Grant, the whisky distiller, since the 1960s.  For ages it was a niche product, but the spirit's unusual packaging and signature serve (with cucumber instead of citrus, elderflower cordial or soda instead of tonic, orange or bitter lemon) sparked with a young and upmarket audience and the rest is history.

Personally I think this is a good thing - gin has been saddled with a boring, off-putting "golf club bore" image for too long.

The other rreason why so many gin distilleries have sprung up is that gin is (comparatively) easy to make, stills are reasonably inexpensive, and gin, unlike whisky, cognac and rum, does not need ageing, Products can therefore be brought to market quickly, and without too much expense. Whether or not the current enthusiasm for artisan gins is a craze - like that mania for exotically-flavoured vodkas of a few years back - or a genuine trend remains to be seen.

 

 

ChrisSU posted:

I'm not sure I could cope with gin without tonic!

We had a Ginger Beer to mix with but yikes I did not like the taste of this at all so I opted for just straight. It was so sweltering hot, I did not want much sugar anyways.

dayjay posted:

 I've just about mastered the gin fizz which easy to make and pretty impressive to serve to guests.

dayjay.

That's fancy!
Googling 'Gin Fizz' and found this video with a cute bartenderess making a violet gin fizz with Hendrick's.

Kevin-W posted:
The other rreason why so many gin distilleries have sprung up is that gin is (comparatively) easy to make, stills are reasonably inexpensive, and gin, unlike whisky, cognac and rum, does not need ageing, Products can therefore be brought to market quickly, and without too much expense.

This is why Gin was the bootlegger's choice during the prohibition in the 20's in the US.

Kevin-W posted:

The other rreason why so many gin distilleries have sprung up is that gin is (comparatively) easy to make, stills are reasonably inexpensive, and gin, unlike whisky, cognac and rum, does not need ageing, Products can therefore be brought to market quickly, and without too much expense. Whether or not the current enthusiasm for artisan gins is a craze - like that mania for exotically-flavoured vodkas of a few years back - or a genuine trend remains to be seen.

And I was told that many so called 'craft' gins have appeared is because it's easy and cheap to buy the raw alcohol from over seas .. Apparently often corn alcohol.. on the wholesale market and then  concoct a novel recipe for flavouring the alcohol... and as craft gins are in vogue currently in pubs etc there is a ready, often healthy local demand. Not being a gin producer I can't vouch for this, but sounds plausible and probably a lot easier to do from the excise perspective as well in the UK.

kuma posted:

Kevin,

How does the 10 differ from the standard Tranqueray?

Kuma, they are both the same strength, but 10 is more citrussy and fruity than straight Tanq, which has more of the juniper of a traditional gin. Bartenders usually say that 10 is good in cocktails, while Tanq is best neat or with tonic.

kuma posted:
dayjay posted:

 I've just about mastered the gin fizz which easy to make and pretty impressive to serve to guests.

dayjay.

That's fancy!
Googling 'Gin Fizz' and found this video with a cute bartenderess making a violet gin fizz with Hendrick's.

Very fancy, and nothing like the Gin Fizz that I make!  I have a couple of excellent books on cocktail making with one focussing on the history of cocktails but I haven't seen this version before so interesting to see.  The classic version is gin, caster sugar, lemon and soda water but there are some good twists to liven it up.  Virtually everyone likes them including those like me who don't like gin!

Simon-in-Suffolk posted

And I was told that many so called 'craft' gins have appeared is because it's easy and cheap to buy the raw alcohol from over seas .. Apparently often corn alcohol.. on the wholesale market and then  concoct a novel recipe for flavouring the alcohol... and as craft gins are in vogue currently in pubs etc there is a ready, often healthy local demand. Not being a gin producer I can't vouch for this, but sounds plausible and probably a lot easier to do from the excise perspective as well in the UK.

Not sure about that Simon, the laws on this (ie, importing raw alcohol) are quite strict (especially in the UK) - Trading Standards here in the UK are always busting illegal stills or vendors of fake or bootleg alcohol. With schemes like AWRS, buying spirits from wholesalers abroad could get more difficult.

It is possible to create gin by steeping juniper (gin must contain juniper), coriander, citrus peel and other botanicals in a base spiirit, but to be honest, this kind of bathtub gin doesn't taste that great and isn't always pretty to look at.It's very difficult to get a pure-looking, clear gin from this method. There is also the matter of consistency between batches.

It's also not practical if you want to produce gin in any quanitity - you need a still for this. I'm not sure why anyone would bother trying to make it without a still, except as a hobby.

kuma posted:

We had a Ginger Beer to mix with but yikes I did not like the taste of this at all so I opted for just straight. It was so sweltering hot, I did not want much sugar anyways.

How funny? I happened to grab a Bundaberg for the first time a day or so ago. I'm a fan of all things ginger after dinner for digestion sake, usually in the form of hot teas or Kombuchas, but occasionally a quality ginger ale soda. I thought the Bundaberg was very good - initially sweet but that mellowed with successive drinks and it retained a nice ginger bite throughout. I'm not a liquor drinker yet have to think that a fizzy ginger Kombucha would make a perfect mixer. Anyone here using them?

joerand,

I love ginger in almost any food but not when mixed with something sweet. In Japan there are many ginger drinks or candies but I can't stand them even when I was a kid. It's popular to put in plum wine. My friend mix Ginger beer with rum! and lots of ice in copper cup but not my kinda thing.

 

Einstok is off the chart.  These products have run Heineken out of my refrigerator.  The Arctic Berry is a summer fruited version of their excellent Icelandic White Ale.

 

The Porter is wonderful, too.   These three (including the un fruited Icelandic White Ale) are in a dead heat for my "Best Beer Ever" award.

Mike-B posted:

Deep deep chilled (no ice) Gordons 47% is my favourite way with neat gin.  Some "craft" gins made in UK are really good,  unfortunately hard to find.   All other gins especially all the US & Asians are not worthy & like fake scotch  should not be allowed to market it as gin, & that includes the crap Gordons 37% (white/green label) we are forced to have in UK.     ..............   I'll  get me coat on the way out

Mike, that's a tad harsh .. when you live in the colonies, like I do, you learn to adapt .. I listed my favorite earlier in the thread (Blue Coat Gin from Philadelphia) and it's a cracker .. 

John Willmott posted:

Mike, that's a tad harsh .. when you live in the colonies, like I do, you learn to adapt .. I listed my favorite earlier in the thread (Blue Coat Gin from Philadelphia) and it's a cracker .. 

    like I said John,  I did get my coat on the way out.  I agree,  adapt or go dry.   I've lived & worked for longish stretches in various colonies,  mostly Minneapolis in your part of the world & yes some can be pretty good.  I once found a really nice clean dry gin in a small bar in SF,  trouble was next morning there was no way I could remember its name.  But in a lot of other places I've stayed, out in the bush, one horse towns, or better said as one hyena or donkey or camel towns,  & where surprisingly it's easy to get real 47% Gordons.    

Two beers from a fairly local (well within the region - if stretched) brewery; Ægir Bryggve Blonde and an Ægir IPA. Now continuing with Laphroaig Quarter Cask. Best of all was sipping all of this while listening to The Decemberists and Tedeschi Trucks Band. Lovely!

 

I don't usually drink beer, although the belly says otherwise, but after a quick trip to my local wine shop I ended up buying some of these. First sip hits you hard around the tip of the tongue and then it's all  smooth. Served stupefyingly cold.  Nice!

Tony2011 posted:

I don't usually drink beer, although the belly says otherwise, but after a quick trip to my local wine shop I ended up buying some of these. First sip hits you hard around the tip of the tongue and then it's all  smooth. Served stupefyingly cold.  Nice!

This is an English forum, how dare you come along touting the idea of refrigerated beer!!!!

ChrisSU posted:
Tony2011 posted:

I don't usually drink beer, although the belly says otherwise, but after a quick trip to my local wine shop I ended up buying some of these. First sip hits you hard around the tip of the tongue and then it's all  smooth. Served stupefyingly cold.  Nice!

This is an English forum, how dare you come along touting the idea of refrigerated beer!!!!

Perfectly acceptable..................it is American beer after all.

Thusly,

All this hot weather..........I don't know. 

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×