What HDD for Core?

I am about to order a core. The suggested 2 drives are both pretty low capacity and the one thing that stands out is the Seagate PipeLine is a DVR/Surveillance drive. What 8TB drive would you suggest? Western Digital makes a 8TB (WD80PUZX) Purple line for DVR/Surveillance and Seagate has a 8TB (ST8000VX0022) would these make good drives for the Core?

2TB is very insufficient for my needs, I want to have an 8TB internal and 8TB external.

 

 

Original Post

Dupree, being in a similar position, with a core on order, I asked the same question of naim support. The advise given is that the 2 listed are just examples, and that pretty much any HDX would be OK.

i also enquirer about specific drive specs such as read speeds, drive rpm, etc. I was advised that the demands of the core are quite low, and again any good he'd drive would be suitable.

one query is o know what is the limiting factor in drive size? Naim quote 8tb, but what if you source a 10tb, would that work equally well?

I would certainly put a 10TB drive in it if that was a workable supportable config. I guess I also wonder what type of drive they recommend, the seagate they mention is a DVR drive, so I thought they were implying that a WD Purple or DVR type drive was the best fit.

> On Jan 2, 2017, at 12:06 PM, Naim Audio Forums <alerts@hoop.la> wrote:
>

I have Seagate ST6000VN0041 IronWolf 6TB inside my preproduction box, and a 512Gb Samsung USB3 drive hung off the back too

edited to say i fitted both, device came with nothing

Cbr600 posted:

Keler, I don't think the Samsung evo can be bought at the required capacity, I think they only go to 4tb

i was not talking about capacity, just 2 models of ssd drives that Phil Harris(naim audio consultant) recommends to the uniti core. All models will not be compatible.

Keler Pierre posted:

i am personally waiting to hear comparaison between uniti core and unitserve as servers with ndx or nds. which is best in sound quality. 

If you convince yourself that the uServe "sounds better," you better think long and hard about whether it's a device you want to and can live with for the long-term. It's one thing if you own one and are "invested" in it; quite another if you are just now looking to acquire a server.  Be forewarned!  In EVERY case I'd put my eggs in the basket of Naim's latest development vs. the unit that was introduced in 2010.

i am not convinced that unitserve sounds better. It is my question. But for now , on this forum, two persons have compared it to the unitserve: one thinks the core sounds better and the other one the contrary. So i just follow the forum and wait. Normally the core have to sound better, but perhaps the sound is the same . I don't know. 

jon honeyball posted:

have you read my posting on storage on core?

It is well worth a read for sure.

But it doesn't, nor do I recall any post doing so, comment on HDD or SSD regarding SQ.

After reading your original article I thought I would swap from HDD to SSD as I didn't like the thought of the HDD whirring away 24/7. But I am waiting for the new Core firmware, with metadata editing hopefully, before swapping the drive and reimporting all my US-based music into the Core again.

best

David

Brubacca posted:

Why would a DVR/Surveillance drive be recommended?  They are optimized for constant writes. I would think a NAS drive would be optimum. Good write performance, but more reads. 

It's because it runs all the time, unless the Core goes into deep sleep. Phil has previously commented that a NAS drive might be sub-optimal because it could give up trying to read a tricky sector more quickly as a NAS drive thinks of the population of users not just the current read (my words -his explanation was more technical!)

best

David

If you read the seagate blurb the pipeline series trades off read speed and quick access for a lower noise performance. I had presumed this is why Naim recommended. I have had the core for a few weeks and am delighted. I have now ordered a second seagate hdd as a mirror back up to use along with a seagate usb back up. All are at 4 TB capacity.

Gazza posted:

If you read the seagate blurb the pipeline series trades off read speed and quick access for a lower noise performance. I had presumed this is why Naim recommended. I have had the core for a few weeks and am delighted. I have now ordered a second seagate hdd as a mirror back up to use along with a seagate usb back up. All are at 4 TB capacity.

I think noise is the main issue for me.  My problem is I don't see the Seagate Pipeline for sale here in Canada (the Barracuda is available) I can get the Samsung SSD but I'm put off by the price.  The cost for me off the Samsung SSD is roughly 4.5X the cost of the Seagate Barracuda.  

My plan is to use my Core as a source with no NAS.  I plan to plug a portable drive into the rear usb as a back-up.    

I don't have a huge library - Maybe 400 disks.  So I anticipate 1TB will be adequate for several years.  

Ian Brown posted:
Gazza posted:

If you read the seagate blurb the pipeline series trades off read speed and quick access for a lower noise performance. I had presumed this is why Naim recommended. I have had the core for a few weeks and am delighted. I have now ordered a second seagate hdd as a mirror back up to use along with a seagate usb back up. All are at 4 TB capacity.

I think noise is the main issue for me.  My problem is I don't see the Seagate Pipeline for sale here in Canada (the Barracuda is available) I can get the Samsung SSD but I'm put off by the price.  The cost for me off the Samsung SSD is roughly 4.5X the cost of the Seagate Barracuda.  

My plan is to use my Core as a source with no NAS.  I plan to plug a portable drive into the rear usb as a back-up.    

I don't have a huge library - Maybe 400 disks.  So I anticipate 1TB will be adequate for several years.  

You may not need as much as you think. I have about 300 discs ripped in WAV in my Unitiserve and it is only about 280 GB.

i believe the Seagate Pipeline is known as "Video" in some markets.

best

David

We would be happy to sell the pile of these Seagate drives we have...

I would go for cheap and back up now that the Core has an easy way to back up and retrieve data.

IMO, go with a WD Red , an HTC or a Toshiba (they are well rated) and be ready if it fails.... These days, the failure rate is in practice not so different form brand to brand.

I use WD Red at home and in my tests/supports/shows NAS drives with no issues so far...

 

Hungryhalibut posted:
David Hendon posted:

I don't think there should be a SQ difference either.

But I am occasionally surprised by what I do hear nevertheless when I approach something with scepticism. (Although I don't admit that if Hungry Halibut is listening ....)

best

David

Eh?

What with me being an engineer, and all......

David Hendon posted:
Ian Brown posted:
Gazza posted:

If you read the seagate blurb the pipeline series trades off read speed and quick access for a lower noise performance. I had presumed this is why Naim recommended. I have had the core for a few weeks and am delighted. I have now ordered a second seagate hdd as a mirror back up to use along with a seagate usb back up. All are at 4 TB capacity.

I think noise is the main issue for me.  My problem is I don't see the Seagate Pipeline for sale here in Canada (the Barracuda is available) I can get the Samsung SSD but I'm put off by the price.  The cost for me off the Samsung SSD is roughly 4.5X the cost of the Seagate Barracuda.  

My plan is to use my Core as a source with no NAS.  I plan to plug a portable drive into the rear usb as a back-up.    

I don't have a huge library - Maybe 400 disks.  So I anticipate 1TB will be adequate for several years.  

You may not need as much as you think. I have about 300 discs ripped in WAV in my Unitiserve and it is only about 280 GB.

i believe the Seagate Pipeline is known as "Video" in some markets.

best

David

Thanks for all the advice.  Obviously there are good rationales for the different approaches.

I took the plunge on a Samsung 1 TB SSD.  Based on David's comments above, the 1TB size should be a lifetime of storage for me.  That may change with downloads, but I still prefer to own the hard copy whenever possible.  The plan is to buy in inexpensive portable HDD to use as a back up.  

I haven't turned the Core on yet - It's all ready to go and looks terrific on my rack. 

Manu posted:

We would be happy to sell the pile of these Seagate drives we have...

I would go for cheap and back up now that the Core has an easy way to back up and retrieve data.

IMO, go with a WD Red , an HTC or a Toshiba (they are well rated) and be ready if it fails.... These days, the failure rate is in practice not so different form brand to brand.

I use WD Red at home and in my tests/supports/shows NAS drives with no issues so far...

 

Hi Manu,

I wouldn't specifically recommend the use of "NAS" targeted drives such as the WD "Red" series drives in the Core - let me explain why...

A WD “Red” would work perfectly well in a Core however there are settings on the WD Red drives (as with any other "NAS" oriented drive) that makes them more suited to a multi-drive mirrored / RAIDed environment than for standalone use. One of these is a setting called “TLER” – Time Limited Error Recovery - which is the amount of time that the drive will reattempt to read a block of data before giving up and declaring it as “unreadable”. In a NAS targeted drive this value is set to a short time period so that the drive aborts reading a difficult block of data quickly (knowing that the block can be read from the mirror drive or recreated from the parity drive of an array) so that the NAS itself is able to get on with servicing other data requests and doesn't stall. If a NAS targeted hard disc drive (WD Red, Seagate IronWolf etc.) is used in a single drive environment then in the event of a bad data block being encountered it will simply give up attempting to re-read that block earlier than a “desktop” targeted drive (however that doesn’t mean that the desktop drive would be able to read the block – just that it would try for longer before giving up and saying “Nahhhh – can’t read that”).

It’s like comparing a coupe against the estate version of the same car – the estate will be better suited for some tasks than the coupe and vice versa but you could use either and, on the whole, be no noticeably worse off with one over the other. (Apologies to anyone offended by automotive analogies...)

Any 2.5” or 3.5” SATA hard or solid state drive should be absolutely fine in the core (we’ve not found any that don’t work) however our main testing has been done with the Seagate Pipeline / Video 2TB hard discs or Samsung 850 EVO 512GB or 1TB drives and these are the drives that we specifically recommend.

Cheers

Phil

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