What's the Latest Thing You've Seen at the Cinema II

Christopher_M posted:

The Post. More great story telling.  Slightly over-egged in parts, newsroom life rather romanticised. The conflict between personal and public interest well portrayed.

Good characterisation and some nice quips too.

Saw this the other night. Thought the end rather signposted the follow-up film, which would be fun as I am sure Nixon will be made to look the complete piece of arsewipe that he was.

Black Panther

YetiBoy and YetiDad caught a half term showing this afternoon. Its really rather good. Although connected to the wider Marvel Cinematic Universe, its more or less self contained within its own setting and mythology, which is rather refreshing. A superb cast (esp a gurning Andy Serkis) , well developed characters, excellent production design (truly eye popping in places) and a credible villain. Plus interesting pre and post credit bookend clips that hint at what's to come with Avengers Infinity War (YetiBoy excited at the prospect). Even if a little predictable in places, we both enjoyed it. Although a completely different feel to the recent Thor Ragnarok (which I much preferred).

I do want to try and see both Phantom Thread and especially The Shape of Water at the cinema next If I can make it. 

The Mondrian Hotel in London (the old Sea Containers House) has opened a Curzon cinema in its basement - I went to the launch night and thewy were showing Terry Gilliam's bizarre 1985 dystopian fantasy - a hideous, consumerist world of overly complex, non-functioning technology allied to mostrous, unfeeling bureacracy in the service of a police state...

I'd forgotten what a marvellous picture it is. Stunning visual imagination by the director and cinematographer (Roger Pratt), great score by Michael Kamen too.

 

Blade Runner 2049, tonight. A plot good for a Black Mirror episode, stretched to 152 minutes. Visually exceptional from minute 1 to minute 152, yet not enough to avoid some yawns and frequent moments of zero tension. Probably thought to win at least one Academy Award, it makes Prometheus look like a quick and snappy Loony Tunes cartoon. Only sexy beauties, and an unlikely Sean Young exactly identical to the one of 1982, evidently computerized hence the only real replicant of the whole film. A nice visual trip, but says nothing on man and life, even the original was more interesting under a philosophical aspect. But those who have spent 50,000 for the video room can wait for the 8K version and let their friend open-mouthed.

Max_B posted:

Blade Runner 2049, tonight. A plot good for a Black Mirror episode, stretched to 152 minutes. Visually exceptional from minute 1 to minute 152, yet not enough to avoid some yawns and frequent moments of zero tension. Probably thought to win at least one Academy Award, it makes Prometheus look like a quick and snappy Loony Tunes cartoon. Only sexy beauties, and an unlikely Sean Young exactly identical to the one of 1982, evidently computerized hence the only real replicant of the whole film. A nice visual trip, but says nothing on man and life, even the original was more interesting under a philosophical aspect. But those who have spent 50,000 for the video room can wait for the 8K version and let their friend open-mouthed.

I found the plot and the acting a bit of a plod do not watch this film after a hearty meal as only an occasional dig in the ribs saved me from the embarrassment of snoring loudly. 

I also found the plot slightly flawed in the film... clearly lined up for a sequel... and irritating aspects left open... to be honest I found the film rather dull. The opening shots over the protein farms held so much promise but then seemed to go down hill from there...

To the post about Brazil.. great film.... and the attention do detail of that film was wonderful.. including the telephone ring.. that buzzed in a pathetic , lethargic, descending tone.. that perfectly expressed  the trap of living in the utilitarian dystopian world driving the need to escape.....

Not seen in a movie theatre but on TV (although my TV set is only connected to the Internet, I care to say), I recommend Trumbo, the story of one of the great Hollywood screenplay writers in the black era of McCarthy and the 'communist' list. Well written, well acted and without the pretension of re-writing the visual aspect of cinema. Sadly, not science fiction.

 

Kevin-W posted:

The Mondrian Hotel in London (the old Sea Containers House) has opened a Curzon cinema in its basement - I went to the launch night and thewy were showing Terry Gilliam's bizarre 1985 dystopian fantasy - a hideous, consumerist world of overly complex, non-functioning technology allied to mostrous, unfeeling bureacracy in the service of a police state...

I'd forgotten what a marvellous picture it is. Stunning visual imagination by the director and cinematographer (Roger Pratt), great score by Michael Kamen too.

 

After all these years its testament to its satirical bite that this movie still has the capacity to be quite shocking. Is this Terry Gilliam’s best film I wonder. The (divisive) Fisher King runs it close for me. Still have huge affection for Jabberwocky too as it was my first intro to Gilliam (outside of sneaky peaks of Python) - remember seeing this as a kid on TV for the first time and wanting to find out more about its maker.

Always look forward to a new Gilliam film and hopes are high for The Man Who Killed Don Quixote later this year.

Max_B posted:

Not seen in a movie theatre but on TV (although my TV set is only connected to the Internet, I care to say), I recommend Trumbo, the story of one of the great Hollywood screenplay writers in the black era of McCarthy and the 'communist' list. Well written, well acted and without the pretension of re-writing the visual aspect of cinema. Sadly, not science fiction.

 

I agree Max. I knew little about the man until I watched this film, and found it fascinating. Bryan Cranston as Trumbo is quite excellent.

Black Panther

A well crafted script sets up a villain with whom you can have some empathy. Great production design and a new feel as the protagonist holds authority in a society where choices are not always easy or pure. Yet, somehow this film left me curiously detached. Part of the problem is that however well made these films are there are no genuine stakes, the forthcoming Infinity War may fix that as an issue.

Ultimately a well made by the numbers Marvel film. For me no genuine joy, excitement or suspense.

M

tonym posted:
Max_B posted:

Not seen in a movie theatre but on TV (although my TV set is only connected to the Internet, I care to say), I recommend Trumbo, the story of one of the great Hollywood screenplay writers in the black era of McCarthy and the 'communist' list. Well written, well acted and without the pretension of re-writing the visual aspect of cinema. Sadly, not science fiction.

 

I agree Max. I knew little about the man until I watched this film, and found it fascinating. Bryan Cranston as Trumbo is quite excellent.

It has made me want to watch again Martin Ritt's The Front, with Zero Mostel and Woody Allen, which is about the same era and facts and, if I remember correctly, not exactly funny...

I have a soft spot for films set in the American mid-west or the south. So I was looking forward to 3 billboards....it was pretty good, especially whilst Woody Harlsden was in it but I found my empathy waning for the main woman by the end. I much preferred The Judge, Hell or Highwater and Windriver of the set in America films I have caught recently.

The Shape of Water

With Mrs W. Both of us bona fide fans of 'Pan's Labyrinth' this one was high on our list to see but have to confess we were equally in unison at being very disappointed. The set design and style is indeed sumptuously imagined (although a bit derivative) but we found it disjointed, unnecessary violent and lacking pace or indeed nuance sometimes. The main problem was that neither of us really suspended disbelief to be swept along by the concept.

I did also find it a bit odd that because the lead character is mute she should somehow be portrayed a 'simple', or so it seemed to me.

'PL' is nasty and violent at times but it has a logic and context. Ditto the fantasy sequences. It is moving and human in a way 'SoW' did not get close to achieving for us.

I think both of us dislike the violence in modern films more and more. The bar for violence in 15 certificates seems to be lower, or we are more sensitive. The last Logan movie I found appalling unpleasant with violence perpetrated by and upon kids in particular. I walked out.

Bruce

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