What's the Latest Thing You've Seen at the Cinema II

Christopher_M posted:

The Post. More great story telling.  Slightly over-egged in parts, newsroom life rather romanticised. The conflict between personal and public interest well portrayed.

Good characterisation and some nice quips too.

Saw this the other night. Thought the end rather signposted the follow-up film, which would be fun as I am sure Nixon will be made to look the complete piece of arsewipe that he was.

Black Panther

YetiBoy and YetiDad caught a half term showing this afternoon. Its really rather good. Although connected to the wider Marvel Cinematic Universe, its more or less self contained within its own setting and mythology, which is rather refreshing. A superb cast (esp a gurning Andy Serkis) , well developed characters, excellent production design (truly eye popping in places) and a credible villain. Plus interesting pre and post credit bookend clips that hint at what's to come with Avengers Infinity War (YetiBoy excited at the prospect). Even if a little predictable in places, we both enjoyed it. Although a completely different feel to the recent Thor Ragnarok (which I much preferred).

I do want to try and see both Phantom Thread and especially The Shape of Water at the cinema next If I can make it. 

The Mondrian Hotel in London (the old Sea Containers House) has opened a Curzon cinema in its basement - I went to the launch night and thewy were showing Terry Gilliam's bizarre 1985 dystopian fantasy - a hideous, consumerist world of overly complex, non-functioning technology allied to mostrous, unfeeling bureacracy in the service of a police state...

I'd forgotten what a marvellous picture it is. Stunning visual imagination by the director and cinematographer (Roger Pratt), great score by Michael Kamen too.

 

Blade Runner 2049, tonight. A plot good for a Black Mirror episode, stretched to 152 minutes. Visually exceptional from minute 1 to minute 152, yet not enough to avoid some yawns and frequent moments of zero tension. Probably thought to win at least one Academy Award, it makes Prometheus look like a quick and snappy Loony Tunes cartoon. Only sexy beauties, and an unlikely Sean Young exactly identical to the one of 1982, evidently computerized hence the only real replicant of the whole film. A nice visual trip, but says nothing on man and life, even the original was more interesting under a philosophical aspect. But those who have spent 50,000 for the video room can wait for the 8K version and let their friend open-mouthed.

Max_B posted:

Blade Runner 2049, tonight. A plot good for a Black Mirror episode, stretched to 152 minutes. Visually exceptional from minute 1 to minute 152, yet not enough to avoid some yawns and frequent moments of zero tension. Probably thought to win at least one Academy Award, it makes Prometheus look like a quick and snappy Loony Tunes cartoon. Only sexy beauties, and an unlikely Sean Young exactly identical to the one of 1982, evidently computerized hence the only real replicant of the whole film. A nice visual trip, but says nothing on man and life, even the original was more interesting under a philosophical aspect. But those who have spent 50,000 for the video room can wait for the 8K version and let their friend open-mouthed.

I found the plot and the acting a bit of a plod do not watch this film after a hearty meal as only an occasional dig in the ribs saved me from the embarrassment of snoring loudly. 

I also found the plot slightly flawed in the film... clearly lined up for a sequel... and irritating aspects left open... to be honest I found the film rather dull. The opening shots over the protein farms held so much promise but then seemed to go down hill from there...

To the post about Brazil.. great film.... and the attention do detail of that film was wonderful.. including the telephone ring.. that buzzed in a pathetic , lethargic, descending tone.. that perfectly expressed  the trap of living in the utilitarian dystopian world driving the need to escape.....

Not seen in a movie theatre but on TV (although my TV set is only connected to the Internet, I care to say), I recommend Trumbo, the story of one of the great Hollywood screenplay writers in the black era of McCarthy and the 'communist' list. Well written, well acted and without the pretension of re-writing the visual aspect of cinema. Sadly, not science fiction.

 

Kevin-W posted:

The Mondrian Hotel in London (the old Sea Containers House) has opened a Curzon cinema in its basement - I went to the launch night and thewy were showing Terry Gilliam's bizarre 1985 dystopian fantasy - a hideous, consumerist world of overly complex, non-functioning technology allied to mostrous, unfeeling bureacracy in the service of a police state...

I'd forgotten what a marvellous picture it is. Stunning visual imagination by the director and cinematographer (Roger Pratt), great score by Michael Kamen too.

 

After all these years its testament to its satirical bite that this movie still has the capacity to be quite shocking. Is this Terry Gilliam’s best film I wonder. The (divisive) Fisher King runs it close for me. Still have huge affection for Jabberwocky too as it was my first intro to Gilliam (outside of sneaky peaks of Python) - remember seeing this as a kid on TV for the first time and wanting to find out more about its maker.

Always look forward to a new Gilliam film and hopes are high for The Man Who Killed Don Quixote later this year.

Max_B posted:

Not seen in a movie theatre but on TV (although my TV set is only connected to the Internet, I care to say), I recommend Trumbo, the story of one of the great Hollywood screenplay writers in the black era of McCarthy and the 'communist' list. Well written, well acted and without the pretension of re-writing the visual aspect of cinema. Sadly, not science fiction.

 

I agree Max. I knew little about the man until I watched this film, and found it fascinating. Bryan Cranston as Trumbo is quite excellent.

Black Panther

A well crafted script sets up a villain with whom you can have some empathy. Great production design and a new feel as the protagonist holds authority in a society where choices are not always easy or pure. Yet, somehow this film left me curiously detached. Part of the problem is that however well made these films are there are no genuine stakes, the forthcoming Infinity War may fix that as an issue.

Ultimately a well made by the numbers Marvel film. For me no genuine joy, excitement or suspense.

M

tonym posted:
Max_B posted:

Not seen in a movie theatre but on TV (although my TV set is only connected to the Internet, I care to say), I recommend Trumbo, the story of one of the great Hollywood screenplay writers in the black era of McCarthy and the 'communist' list. Well written, well acted and without the pretension of re-writing the visual aspect of cinema. Sadly, not science fiction.

 

I agree Max. I knew little about the man until I watched this film, and found it fascinating. Bryan Cranston as Trumbo is quite excellent.

It has made me want to watch again Martin Ritt's The Front, with Zero Mostel and Woody Allen, which is about the same era and facts and, if I remember correctly, not exactly funny...

I have a soft spot for films set in the American mid-west or the south. So I was looking forward to 3 billboards....it was pretty good, especially whilst Woody Harlsden was in it but I found my empathy waning for the main woman by the end. I much preferred The Judge, Hell or Highwater and Windriver of the set in America films I have caught recently.

The Shape of Water

With Mrs W. Both of us bona fide fans of 'Pan's Labyrinth' this one was high on our list to see but have to confess we were equally in unison at being very disappointed. The set design and style is indeed sumptuously imagined (although a bit derivative) but we found it disjointed, unnecessary violent and lacking pace or indeed nuance sometimes. The main problem was that neither of us really suspended disbelief to be swept along by the concept.

I did also find it a bit odd that because the lead character is mute she should somehow be portrayed a 'simple', or so it seemed to me.

'PL' is nasty and violent at times but it has a logic and context. Ditto the fantasy sequences. It is moving and human in a way 'SoW' did not get close to achieving for us.

I think both of us dislike the violence in modern films more and more. The bar for violence in 15 certificates seems to be lower, or we are more sensitive. The last Logan movie I found appalling unpleasant with violence perpetrated by and upon kids in particular. I walked out.

Bruce

Bob the Builder posted:
Max_B posted:

Blade Runner 2049, tonight. A plot good for a Black Mirror episode, stretched to 152 minutes. Visually exceptional from minute 1 to minute 152, yet not enough to avoid some yawns and frequent moments of zero tension. Probably thought to win at least one Academy Award, it makes Prometheus look like a quick and snappy Loony Tunes cartoon. Only sexy beauties, and an unlikely Sean Young exactly identical to the one of 1982, evidently computerized hence the only real replicant of the whole film. A nice visual trip, but says nothing on man and life, even the original was more interesting under a philosophical aspect. But those who have spent 50,000 for the video room can wait for the 8K version and let their friend open-mouthed.

I found the plot and the acting a bit of a plod do not watch this film after a hearty meal as only an occasional dig in the ribs saved me from the embarrassment of snoring loudly. 

We're all different, I guess. I found it to be absolutely superb. More-so on the second and third viewing.

Three billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

McDonagh's follow-up to In Bruges is a fantastic film carried by Frances McDormand as a bitter, guilt-ridden mother trying to shake up the police (and the community) into solving the murder of her daughter. She is surrounded by a colourful cast of characters including equally superb performances by Woody Harrelson and Sam Rockwell, who make sure that her actions find plenty of grip. Some hard hitting emotional scenes balance out the dark comedy, much like as In Bruges. Don't miss it!

EJ

 

J.N. posted:

 

The fictional Ebbing is Sylva NC. Go to Google Maps street-view and head east along W. Main St between Landis St and Spring St, and you'll see a furniture store just beyond the junction with Spring St on the right. It becomes the police station for the film. In fact, Peter Dinklage refers in the dialogue to 'Turning out of Spring' so the real road name in Sylva has been used.

John.

 

Interesting link.

Very well acted, but for me, the film would have been better without the subtle humour.

Mr Underhill posted:

Black Panther

A well crafted script sets up a villain with whom you can have some empathy. Great production design and a new feel as the protagonist holds authority in a society where choices are not always easy or pure. Yet, somehow this film left me curiously detached. Part of the problem is that however well made these films are there are no genuine stakes, the forthcoming Infinity War may fix that as an issue.

Ultimately a well made by the numbers Marvel film. For me no genuine joy, excitement or suspense.

M

I was disappointed with Black Panther. As you said the core tale of revenge starts solid but runs out of steam quite quickly, and by the end we're not seeing anything in terms of visuals or stakes, that we didn't see earlier in the same film. The serious backdrop of conflicting views on how and if Wakanda should open up to the outside world is handled so halfheartedly, it would be a better fit in a DCU movie. The very occasional attempts at comedy didn't come off well, either - Bozeman has the charisma, but his comedic timing may need some work on this evidence. 

Tomb Raider (or: Lara Croft and the Last Crusade)

Just missed Ms Vikander in London yesterday, but with some downtime decided to watch her latest movie today at Leicester Square. Not a great movie, but fun, solid, entertainment. Vikander plays it straight and is IMO a much better Croft than the cynical, self aware Angelina Jolie.

cheers

EJ

EJS posted:

Three billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

McDonagh's follow-up to In Bruges is a fantastic film carried by Frances McDormand as a bitter, guilt-ridden mother trying to shake up the police (and the community) into solving the murder of her daughter. She is surrounded by a colourful cast of characters including equally superb performances by Woody Harrelson and Sam Rockwell, who make sure that her actions find plenty of grip. Some hard hitting emotional scenes balance out the dark comedy, much like as In Bruges. Don't miss it!

EJ

 

Thanks for the heads up regarding In Bruges.

We found it a most enjoyable, quirky film. I preferred it to 3 Billboards and it left us with a desire to visit the Venice of the North. 

OK, so it's probably not going to trouble anyone's Top 3 Spielberg list but it's very entertaining and technically amazing.

And a Tsunami of references start to finish, from Nicol Williamson's Charm of Making to Holy Hand Grenades (I kid you not) means I'm going to have to watch it on DVD to collect the ones I missed...

count.d posted:

The Shape of Water. Very disappointing given all the reviews and awards. Perhaps the awards were given based on it's lighting, sets, etc. I thought the film was childish, but with adult content.

Strongly disagree. We thought it was great. The lighting and cinematography were special, and so was the rest of it.

thebigfredc posted:
EJS posted:

Three billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

McDonagh's follow-up to In Bruges is a fantastic film carried by Frances McDormand as a bitter, guilt-ridden mother trying to shake up the police (and the community) into solving the murder of her daughter. She is surrounded by a colourful cast of characters including equally superb performances by Woody Harrelson and Sam Rockwell, who make sure that her actions find plenty of grip. Some hard hitting emotional scenes balance out the dark comedy, much like as In Bruges. Don't miss it!

EJ

 

Thanks for the heads up regarding In Bruges.

We found it a most enjoyable, quirky film. I preferred it to 3 Billboards and it left us with a desire to visit the Venice of the North. 

In between In Bruges and 3 Billboards is McDonagh's also-excellent 7 Psychopaths. Highly recommended.

Pacific Rim Uprising

Went in with lowish expectations, but what a blast! Incredibly fun film, and like Part 1 a candidate for the year’s best bad film.  Boyega and Eastwood, who acts like his dad in an exagerated fashion, manage to easily carry the film.

cheers

EJ

Ready Player One

Executive Summary
Desperately disappointing although technically excellent. A well acted reference fest that lacks an emotional center, and avoids all the questions that desperately need addressing in the areas within which it plays.

 

Thoughts (with mild spoilers)
The film is set in a dystopian future where most people appear to live in multi-story trailer parks. Their existence is centred on living in a virtual reality where they can live as someone else. This awful state is barely addressed by the film itself. It quickly dives into the faux reality and it is the stakes in that digital existence that form most of the drama that is addressed. The awfulness of living your life based around communicating with the avatars of (perhaps) people is acknowledged at the end of the film, as a barely thought about tacked on couple of lines.

The film has the main characters facing off against an army of people who must have known their morally ambiguous roles, but were happy to go along with 'The Company' in return for the material benefits gained. Something of strong resonance with the world we face today; and, something that was simply accepted as the norm and not addressed or confronted.

Overall we were given a dreadful world populated with people who had little moral or ethical centre, and neither of these situations was properly examined by the film. The main protagonist ONLY triumphed, whatever that means in this context, as the main antagonist appeared to suffer a moral twinge at the end - and, as he had acted in a dimwitted and direct way when he had staff available who would be more proficient and give him plausible deniability. Sloppy writing.

For me this film would have been so much better if it had concentrated on what was happening in the real world, with forays into the digital world that helped the protagonists solve and address problems they were facing.

The more I consider this film the less I like it. The only element I did enjoy was picking up all the references. My wife watched the first ten minutes and then fell asleep.

 

Duck Duck Goose

If you have children in the 4 - 12 age range then I think this will keep them nicely occupied, and there is some content for the accompanying adult; I have to say that i enjoyed it, but I can verge on the soppy.

Although based in the animal world it is all about the human world. Two children are separated from their siblings and are picked up by an injured adult who thinks of them as mobile cover, the rest is a tale of bonding , but done well. You will see a number of borrowed homages, or simple plagiarism, but this will simply go over the head of the target audience.

This film does have some nice animation and a few directorial flourishes, I particularly enjoyed the sequences in the caves and later in the film when some daring do was called for, I won't get any more specific as that would be spoilers.

If you have children in the right age range then I would say this is a solid recommendation.

M

A fascinating documentary about the now-defunct UK music weekly and its chief staff photographer. At this showing at the Regent Street Cinema (right next to the plaque commemorating the formation of Pink Floyd), director Coles and MM stalwarts, Chrises Welch and Charlesworth were on hand to take questions. Worth 85 minutes of your time if it comes on telly, orr to a fleapit near you.

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