What wine are you drinking today ?

For the last couple of years this has been a guilty pleasure everyday type of wine, under £5 job. A bit rough around the edges but still perfectly drinkable.

The latest 2016 vintage although is sadly not. I took back an opened bottle telling dear Tesco guy that it's turned. Gave me another that's just as vile. Blurghhh. Best avoided.

 

Lovely wine, Musar's the the only Lebanese wine I've bought to keep. Cork came out whole, poured cleanly with less than 5mm of sediment in the bottle, great for a wine with just short of a quarter century in bottle. Fantastic wine, sweet red and blue fruits, spicy notes, leather, great acidity, seems light flavoured, but actually fills the palate totally, every mouthful is different, all lovely. I have 2 left of this vintage and 2 of the '91, bought back in the '90s.

Eoink posted:

 

Lovely wine, Musar's the the only Lebanese wine I've bought to keep. Cork came out whole, poured cleanly with less than 5mm of sediment in the bottle, great for a wine with just short of a quarter century in bottle. Fantastic wine, sweet red and blue fruits, spicy notes, leather, great acidity, seems light flavoured, but actually fills the palate totally, every mouthful is different, all lovely. I have 2 left of this vintage and 2 of the '91, bought back in the '90s.

Thanks Eoin, seems my 2004 may be good for another ten.

Is it odd to think that the 2014 is on sale now at around £20 and could be drunk tonight?

Best, C.

Musar has fascinated me for years. Hochar used to hold it back for about 5 years, it would then drink well. Then it would become closed down for a while, and need hours in decanter. My experience of Musar is that at about 15-20 years it would hit a weird youthful maturity where it suddenly became amazingly attractive, but yet complex, and variable between glasses and over hours, and still be great 24 hours later. 

I've only drunk younger (2000s) vintages in restaurants, so not with decant time, so can't say for sure what's happened since Gaston took over from Serge in the early 2000s. The 2002-2005 wines I have tried behaved like I would have expected for the decade older wines, do I'd have great hopes for 2004 if kept in good temperatures.

I noticed that an earlier poster was an MW, so if he spots this, he will have a very informed view. 

Christopher_M posted:
Eoink posted:

 

Lovely wine, Musar's the the only Lebanese wine I've bought to keep. Cork came out whole, poured cleanly with less than 5mm of sediment in the bottle, great for a wine with just short of a quarter century in bottle. Fantastic wine, sweet red and blue fruits, spicy notes, leather, great acidity, seems light flavoured, but actually fills the palate totally, every mouthful is different, all lovely. I have 2 left of this vintage and 2 of the '91, bought back in the '90s.

Thanks Eoin, seems my 2004 may be good for another ten.

Is it odd to think that the 2014 is on sale now at around £20 and could be drunk tonight?

Best, C.

Coincidentally, I enjoyed 1979 and 1999 vintages last night. Two very different wines.

If anyone is interested, I have published my report on the 2016 Bordeaux Primeurs - and I believe, subject to not-too-ridiculous price increases, that some of them will constitute a good investment. It really is a spectacular vintage, and far more classic and refined than the (to me over-)exuberant 2015s, and the equal of anything since 2005, and possibly before.

You can get the free report by visiting rivierawineacademy.

Hope that doesn't interfere with anything Richard. No commercial gain for me, just interest for others.

I think the style of Musar has changed since Gaston took over, and it is more approachable in youth. It remains a wine that benefits from as much age as any, but what an individual likes maybe any point along that development.

If buying a young vintage for drinking now, I would certainly open and decant it many hours in advance (even the day before).

£24 seems quite good value for such history and pedigree in a bottle to me. It can only go up in price!

Cheers

Rod

PS I understand why my link in the post above was removed (sorry!) but for ease of direction, the relevant page is on the 'blog' part of my site, if you are interested 

Richard Dane posted:

Santa Rita Medalla Real Carmenere 2011.  

A favourite everyday drinking red - the quality and consistency here is excellent and the value for money is undeniable.  I've Just opened up my last half case of this and I'll definitely be buying more.

Hi Richard,

I've ordered some of this which has just turned up....no pressure..hope its nice!!!!

Dustysox posted:
Richard Dane posted:

Santa Rita Medalla Real Carmenere 2011.  

A favourite everyday drinking red - the quality and consistency here is excellent and the value for money is undeniable.  I've Just opened up my last half case of this and I'll definitely be buying more.

Hi Richard,

I've ordered some of this which has just turned up....no pressure..hope its nice!!!!

I know this one. It is beefy as the SuperNait 1. I had it last year with Christmas to join Pork & Sauerkraut (have German family) and it combined magically well.

Sweet, round, strong and self-aware.

Ardbeg10y posted:
Dustysox posted:
Richard Dane posted:

Santa Rita Medalla Real Carmenere 2011.  

A favourite everyday drinking red - the quality and consistency here is excellent and the value for money is undeniable.  I've Just opened up my last half case of this and I'll definitely be buying more.

Hi Richard,

I've ordered some of this which has just turned up....no pressure..hope its nice!!!!

I know this one. It is beefy as the SuperNait 1. I had it last year with Christmas to join Pork & Sauerkraut (have German family) and it combined magically well.

Sweet, round, strong and self-aware.

I see it has had a GR (Gran Reserva) upgrade...sorry couldn't resist!!!

I will hopefully get to enjoy this fine bottle of wine over the coming weekend.

Dave J posted:
Christopher_M posted:
Eoink posted:

 

Lovely wine, Musar's the the only Lebanese wine I've bought to keep. Cork came out whole, poured cleanly with less than 5mm of sediment in the bottle, great for a wine with just short of a quarter century in bottle. Fantastic wine, sweet red and blue fruits, spicy notes, leather, great acidity, seems light flavoured, but actually fills the palate totally, every mouthful is different, all lovely. I have 2 left of this vintage and 2 of the '91, bought back in the '90s.

Thanks Eoin, seems my 2004 may be good for another ten.

Is it odd to think that the 2014 is on sale now at around £20 and could be drunk tonight?

Best, C.

Coincidentally, I enjoyed 1979 and 1999 vintages last night. Two very different wines.

Even more coincidentally I enjoyed a bottle of the 1998 a couple of days ago. Fantastic wine and one of my favourites.

rodwsmith posted:

If anyone is interested, I have published my report on the 2016 Bordeaux Primeurs - and I believe, subject to not-too-ridiculous price increases, that some of them will constitute a good investment. It really is a spectacular vintage, and far more classic and refined than the (to me over-)exuberant 2015s, and the equal of anything since 2005, and possibly before.

You can get the free report by visiting rivierawineacademy.

Hope that doesn't interfere with anything Richard. No commercial gain for me, just interest for others.

Great read Rod - thanks for the tip .... am on the mailing list now ... thx

Chapel Down - they're just down the road from me. If you like Bacchus then also try their Flint Dry - also lovely.

I haven't visited the vineyard for a few years but last time I was there I tried their Pinot Noir Red that they were looking to bring to market.  It certainly showed excellent promise and I must get down there again to try the finished article.

Talking of English wine, I was recently given a bottle of Sharpham Estate Selection Dry the vinyard is at Totnes Devon. The grape variety is Madeleine Angevine & it went extremely well with scallops, I find the fridge is too cold for most white wine so put it in a bucket of well water to try and achieve about 8-9 degrees.

Tonight its Roche Mazet - Merlot, which at around 10 euros for 3 litres is perfectly acceptable.

Found a pic

Around 10 years ago, my wife and I were holidaying in Northumberland, and the bistro near our cottage had Madeleine Angevine wine from a North Yorkshire vineyard, Neverthorpe. We ordered it out of curiosity, and we're really impressed, it had much more body, flavour and true complexity than we would have believed possible from a vineyard that far north. (It was also my first exposure to the grape, until I looked it up, I thought it was a brand name.) Very classy wine, a couple of places near me in West Yorkshire stock it, it's a very fine example of English wine, and a good way to surprise people when you tell them where it's from.

rodwsmith posted:

If anyone is interested, I have published my report on the 2016 Bordeaux Primeurs - and I believe, subject to not-too-ridiculous price increases, that some of them will constitute a good investment. It really is a spectacular vintage, and far more classic and refined than the (to me over-)exuberant 2015s, and the equal of anything since 2005, and possibly before.

You can get the free report by visiting rivierawineacademy

Hope that doesn't interfere with anything Richard. No commercial gain for me, just interest for others.

Thanks Rod, I've been thinking about possibly getting some 2016s, having been out of the En Primeur market for 15 years or so (apart from the odd case here and there, but nothing after 2008). Being in my mid 50s, I don't want to go for vins de gardes, I'm not convinced I'll be around for the 1999 Gouges LSG to be perfect, let alone a top 2016 claret. I got a tempting offer on the 2016 Lynch Moussas today, and thought it looked like one that would be worth going for, glad I read your notes. 

Suzy Wong posted:

Got out of Bordeaux twenty years ago when the prices skyrocketed.......

Shame, really

In the '90s I bought Burgundy, it didn't get ridiculous in price, and also had good/ great vintages when Bordeaux had a lot of poor/bad ones. Then I had a life change and stopped buying anything, apart from the odd case here and there when prices looked good (e.g, Leoville Barton 2008). But now thinking that having tasted and bought some of the minor Crus, e.g.  Batailley, in the last few years, maybe it's worth laying down a few cases of '15 or '16 for my 60s. 

I wasn't taken with Lynch Moussas this year I'm afraid. But I'm just one person, and they are just cask samples...

Smart money, including my own, is buying very high % Cabernet 2014s. It's true that it was a poor vintage for Merlot, but for CS it was really very good. Some wonderful St Estephe and Pauillac to be had. More for future drinking pleasure than money-making though - but it is wine after all.

I've had a real soft spot for Larose since I got into claret in the mid-'80s, when Cordier owned it. 2nd last of  a case, old school claret, pencil graphite, drying tannins from the vintage, a lovely cassis/darker fruit palate, and Gruaud dirt with fruits on the nose. I like this style of claret a huge amount,  went well with lamb in red wine and rosemary (although I had to make sure I didn't have any with the lettuce/fennel/radish/ginger/garlic/vinaigrette salad). Now going well with the end of the Stevie Ray/Albert King CD. I've not been impressed with most 21st century Laroses I've tasted, this feels a bit like the last of the slightly clumsy but loveable claret I knew. 

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