What wine are you drinking today ?

I’m sure most people are guilty of at least one of these “sins”  listed below and I must confess, living in the UK where temperatures are very rarely over 10C, I never found the need to refrigerate a bottle of the red stuff.

The UK's top 20 wine-drinking faux pas:

1-Putting red wine in the fridge
2-Using a corkscrew on a screw-cap
3-Drinking from the bottle
4-Asking for ice in your wine
5-Serving in a wine glass with old lipstick stains
6-Chipped glasses
7-Trying to unscrew a cork
8-Taking a cheap bottle to a party
9-Gulping wine rather than sipping it
10-Not bringing a bottle but drinking everyone else's
11-Drinking it out of a tumbler
12-Pouring yourself a glass before pouring others on the table
13-Asking for a slice of lemon
14-Shaking the bottle before serving
15-Asking the waiter to pour you more when they were intending      you to taste it
16-Putting lemonade with red wine
17-Complaining the red wine isn't cold
18-Pronouncing the 't' in Pinot Noir
19-Taking a bottle home with you after it wasn't opened at the host's party
20-Pronouncing the 't' in Merlot.

Bottoms Up!

 

wait, wait. hold on a damn minute. nothing wrong with #11.

at the moment: 2013 Joseph Swan Vineyards Russian River Valley pinot noir. (silent T.) California wine isn't normally my jam, despite living in the USA, but this is pretty good! not overdone.

Tony2011 posted:

I’m sure most people are guilty of at least one of these “sins”  listed below and I must confess, living in the UK where temperatures are very rarely over 10C, I never found the need to refrigerate a bottle of the red stuff.

The UK's top 20 wine-drinking faux pas:


3-Drinking from the bottle

 

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/c6/8a/fe/c68afe71605bde290b8d25710972f8a0--rod-stewart-david-bowie-starman.jpg

Rod did upgrade from blue nun to the good fizz, but always made no 3 look classy.

It was an interesting tasting of 'odd' vintages.

Here is what I wrote at the time:

Tasting at Cos d'Estournel

27 /11/17

Pagodes de Cos 2011
55 CS 45 M
Spicy warm oak, black fruit. Rich and full. Generous for the vintage. Some green hints 17

Cos d'Estournel 2011
70CS 27M 2CF 1PV
Much richer, sweeter oak aromas, more youthful looking. Spices. No green. 17

Cos d'Estournel 2008
78CS 22M
Earth, spice aromas, some coffee. Opening to reveal violet and black fruit.
Blackberry, cream, serious dry tannins. Opening. Approachable, youthful. 17.5

Cos d'Estournel 2003
65CS 27M 8PV
Warm earthy spices, some smoke, tea. Violets scorched black fruit. Dry tannins on finish. Not jammy, not hot. Ready. 18

Cos d'Estournel 2002
65CS 45M
Savoury and smoky. Pencil shavings and cedar. Smoke and spices. Dry fruit. Fairly classic. Delicious although lacks huge weight and complexity 17.5

Cos d'Estournel Blanc 2013
80S 20Sm
Oak and vanilla aromas, some smoke, rich honeyed flavour, crisp acidity and lemon. Bit over oaky 16

rodwsmith posted:
(A bit like 1976 in southern England, if you are old enough, or were there to remember that)
 
"I am that ancient Mariner, 
And I stoppeth one of three. 
'By my long-gone beard and glittering eye, 
Now wherefore stopp'st I thee? "
 
I was stacking and bringing in the bales after the harvest on a farm near Oxford - it was that Summer of the Ladybirds.
 
One of the buggers bit me - just as I was concluding the indulgent "Ladybird, ladybird, fly away home. Your house is on fire and ..." Ouch you little swine!
 
A tale usually met with incredulity - by young types.
 
End of diversion:-
"'Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon!' 
Eftsoons my hand dropt me."
 
rodwsmith - how do you think this year's French wines will turn out?
Definitely météorologiques exceptionnelles around Cahors and the Lot this summer.
Although each recent year seemed to throw up something unexpected.

2017 is a weird and small vintage in France (and in Europe) and by coincidence in most other places too

If you draw a line from Pau to Luxembourg, then anywhere east of it seems to have had a good vintage, with few of the frost problems that plagued pretty much all the vineyard areas west of it, and some on higher ground everywhere, even in Spain (where frost at budding time is virtually unheard of). Chablis and Champagne, for example, have lost nigh-on 50%, and for the third time in a row.

But where I live in Provence (and where you are too by the sound of it) it was such a mega-heatwave that the ripening will have been speeded up and the harvest was one of the earliest on record. This is mixed news. No Autumn rain to ruin anything, but sugar developing faster than flavour is uneven at best - the wines will either have the right amount of alcohol and be under-ripe tasting, or taste good, but be 15% a.b.v. monsters. A bit like 2003.

West of this line, including Bordeaux it looks like a pretty terrible vintage, continuing the theme that if it ends in a -7, ignore it (true since 1957).

But the combination of frost in Spring and hot dry summers have meant that this is one of the smallest harvests on record (and not only for grapes), and for the first time in ages there may actually be a shortage of wine (as in more demand than there is product rather than anyone really actually running out).

I think we can all guess what that will provoke!

Nothing sadly!  A recent healthy lifestyle drive implemented by my beloved means  it is a dry house we live in at the moment unfortunately my Irish heritage and her German heritage mean that our drinking can border more on the binge rather than the moderate one glass at dinner type drinking and so needless to say in this environment even a bottle of Lambrini would go down an absolute treat.

Yours

Very, very thirsty of Hove!

Florestan posted

Ah, the water of life!  Does it stand up against proper Scandinavian Aquavit?  I doubt this bottle passed the equator twice on a ship between Norway and Australia and back.  Could you tell?

It's very good and even convinced my Norwegian mother - she's 87 - who usually only swears by Linie. Instead of passing the equator twice, it strengthens its character by crossing the rockies, oil sands, fields of grain, large bodies of water and the French-language barrier. The fruit alcohol base leaves a clean finish reminiscent of poire william...

Bob the Builder posted:

Nothing sadly!  A recent healthy lifestyle drive implemented by my beloved means  it is a dry house we live in at the moment unfortunately my Irish heritage and her German heritage mean that our drinking can border more on the binge rather than the moderate one glass at dinner type drinking and so needless to say in this environment even a bottle of Lambrini would go down an absolute treat.

Yours

Very, very thirsty of Hove!

Same here Bob. My current medication doesn't permit the consumption of any alcohol, so that's it. A real shame - I've got a reasonable collection of good bottles which now my visitors will enjoy without me.

We were over at The Chapel Down Vineyard yesterday for lunch and had two interesting and contrasting Chardonnays, both from the 2014 vintage. The first was the straight Chapel Down Chardonnay: Described as "An elegant unoaked Chardonnay with aromas of apple, white peach and kiwi fruit with background aromas of fresh hay. The palate is fresh and linear with pineapple and citrus characters leading to a mineral finish."  I'd go with that.  I like this one very much, and it seems to be particularly good value too.



Next came a Chapel Down Kit's Coty Chardonnay.  This was more in the Napa style with use of oak. I had heard great things about this wine - the 2013 having arrived to a lot of fanfare - so expectations were high. Straight away it was obviously a richer wine than the straight Chardonnay, however, the balance was frustratingly just short of ideal.  It just needed a touch more fruit and acidity for me, and I felt the oak, while not excessive, had just tipped over the balance.

It was, however, impressive, of a quality that was probably unthinkable a couple of decades ago for an English wine.  I still have to pinch myself to remind me that these are wines being made practically on my doorstep.

Richard Dane posted



Next came a Chapel Down Kit's Coty Chardonnay.  This was more in the Napa style with use of oak. I had heard great things about this wine - the 2013 having arrived to a lot of fanfare - so expectations were high. Straight away it was obviously a richer wine than the straight Chardonnay, however, the balance was frustratingly just short of ideal.  It just needed a touch more fruit and acidity for me, and I felt the oak, while not excessive, had just tipped over the balance.

It was, however, impressive, of a quality that was probably unthinkable a couple of decades ago for an English wine.  I still have to pinch myself to remind me that these are wines being made practically on my doorstep.

That's interesting Richard. I used to live in Kit's Coty, an area just off Bluebell Hill in Kent. Kit's Coty itself is an ancient burial mound on the side of the hill. The local fields of rape and serial corps I used to run through were supplanted by grape vines several years ago, so I assume their grapes are more than likely the source of this wine. Shame I'm teetotal, or I'd give it a try!

nickpeacock posted:

 

Graillot - Crozes-Hermitage 2015

Soft, gentle and lovely Northern Rhone. Everyone should drink Graillot’s wine at least once in their life. I could happily drink nothing but Rhone wine till the end of days.

Ooh, nice, Crozes is such a lovely wine, a good chunk of Hermitage style without the price or the need to wait 10-20 years for a great vintage.

1996 Vosne Romaneé Les Chaumes from Jean Tardy. Last of a case bought en primeur 20 years ago. Swinging acidity from the vintage, but I love acidic wines, and the fruit and tannin still balance it well. Lovely dark red fruits, complex lovely wine, good mid-rank Burgundy. The bottle is empty because I tend to decant acidic Burgundy vintages (1993,1996) as time in carafe seems to me to tame the acidity (sorry Rod).  Last of my ‘96es apart from 6 “name” Chambolles that I’m scared to drink. 

Meanwhile, I have finished my Bordeaux En Primeur 2017 report. 

If I recollect correctly it is not appropriate to post a link here (although is in no way commercial, - I write for a Chinese client, which then gets translated into Mandarin and distributed to around 12,000 people), the English version is mine to do with as I please.

My website is Riviera Wine Academy (dot com), and it is on the blog page. Easy to find if interested!

Santé

Rod

Tony2011 posted:

I’m sure most people are guilty of at least one of these “sins”  listed below and I must confess, living in the UK where temperatures are very rarely over 10C, I never found the need to refrigerate a bottle of the red stuff.

The UK's top 20 wine-drinking faux pas:

1-Putting red wine in the fridge
2-Using a corkscrew on a screw-cap
3-Drinking from the bottle
4-Asking for ice in your wine
5-Serving in a wine glass with old lipstick stains
6-Chipped glasses
7-Trying to unscrew a cork
8-Taking a cheap bottle to a party
9-Gulping wine rather than sipping it
10-Not bringing a bottle but drinking everyone else's
11-Drinking it out of a tumbler
12-Pouring yourself a glass before pouring others on the table
13-Asking for a slice of lemon
14-Shaking the bottle before serving
15-Asking the waiter to pour you more when they were intending      you to taste it
16-Putting lemonade with red wine
17-Complaining the red wine isn't cold
18-Pronouncing the 't' in Pinot Noir
19-Taking a bottle home with you after it wasn't opened at the host's party
20-Pronouncing the 't' in Merlot.

Bottoms Up!

 

As for 1 it depends very much on the red wine of course. The other one is over chilling whites to permafrost levels

I gave up any alcohol since almost 6 months – not out of AA-like issues, but simply to cure my stomach on oder to start quitting all prazoles, which I was taking since years. I miss a good red or a plain sparkling, trattoria white sometimes, but I feel much better.

A lot off-topic, but a hallo to all who are fortunate enough to be able to drink wine without having their stomach trying to digest itself, the esophagus and the rest of the body...

Cheers!

Max

 

 

2012 Langoa Barton, drinking surprisingly well for such a young wine. Decanted for about 3 hours before starting, with the first glass sitting for about an hour before the first sip. It’s got a lovely cassis nose, with some muddy tannin scents. On the palate nice sweet cassis with cherry hints, some hints of nutmeg and spice, good acidity and a level of soft chocolatey tannins that makes me think I’m likely to have to brush my teeth for a long time tonight to remove the red stains (just looked in the mirror, purple lips). It’s a nice claret, good for the vintage, probably got another 10-12 years, but apart from softening the tannins I wouldn’t expect fantastic development, I’ll probably drink the other bottle I picked up today fairly soon, if I have friends round who like youngish tannic wines. 

Until a couple of months ago Halifax (5 miles from me) had a very good wine merchant, but Andy and Karen decided to retire and we had no local access to fine wines. Meeting a friend in town today we spotted a new wine shop, open 2 weeks, and had a nosey. A good selection of sensibly priced wines, and a smallish fine wine section, from which I picked up a few bottles to try (or in the case of the 2 2014 Tignanellos stick in the cellar for 10years).  Got chatting to the owner who also owns a very good restaurant in town, he’s pleasantly surprised to find that most of his custom is in the “medium up” price range. I suspect that's because the big supermarkets do  a very good job of providing nice wines at the lower price ranges (as well as some stuff that really doesn’t work for me at all).

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