What wine are you drinking today ?

I think a very compelling case can be made for Sherry being the finest wine in the world.

And if this were exhibit A, then the case would get closed pretty quickly.

A solera-aged mixture of wines of at least 30 years (probably going back nearly a century), this is justifiably expensive (circa €75) - especially now that fine Sherry is getting trendy again. But that is absurdly cheap for something that has taken 30 years to make. It only takes 8 months to make a jumbo jet!

Intoxicating flavours of nuts, caramel, orange peel and spices. Layer upon layer of flavour and a finish that goes on for ages. Dry but rich and utterly delicious. You can taste why they can sell off their used empty barrels to the Scotch industry.

When Ferran Adria (El Bulli, arguably the greatest chef in the world, and a Catalan) was asked:

"What is your favourite wine?" he replied:

"Well, Sherry, of course, and if you ask another stupid question this interview is over."

I'm with him!

The weather has taken a turn for the worse, so I decided a heavy red would be a good way to finish the week. 1999 Hermitage La Chapelle, bought at a bargain price when it didn't sell en primeur. Two different feelings, it's actually a very good wine, still youthful red colour, good nose, lovely palate of purple and black fruits with earth and spice and reasonable power and length, offer it to me as an Hermitage from a competent maker in a good vintage and I'd be happy. But it's La Chapelle  from a great Northern Rhone vintage, and is sadly nowhere near where it should have been, the years after Gerard's death (which was obviously the real tragedy) were poor for La Chapelle, this should have been an all time great. The one bottle of each of the '88 and '89 I have left will blow this away for complexity and pleasure, it should be as the two bottles of '78 I shared with a friend years ago, but they were actually in a different quality world. 

So very enjoyable, as I bought it at a reasonable price it was good value, just doesn't live up to the label.

Richard Morris posted:
Dave J posted:
Christopher_M posted:
Eoink posted:

 

Lovely wine, Musar's the the only Lebanese wine I've bought to keep. Cork came out whole, poured cleanly with less than 5mm of sediment in the bottle, great for a wine with just short of a quarter century in bottle. Fantastic wine, sweet red and blue fruits, spicy notes, leather, great acidity, seems light flavoured, but actually fills the palate totally, every mouthful is different, all lovely. I have 2 left of this vintage and 2 of the '91, bought back in the '90s.

Thanks Eoin, seems my 2004 may be good for another ten.

Is it odd to think that the 2014 is on sale now at around £20 and could be drunk tonight?

Best, C.

Coincidentally, I enjoyed 1979 and 1999 vintages last night. Two very different wines.

Even more coincidentally I enjoyed a bottle of the 1998 a couple of days ago. Fantastic wine and one of my favourites.

Gents, where best in the U.K. to source these Musar's please ?

I thought I replied a few minutes ago, if I'm breaking rules and you removed it Richard I'm sorry. If I just had finger trouble when posting, then a shorter summary. The maturitish vintages around the turn of the century are available from Majestic, I bought some after the exchange you quoted, my experience is that the mature wines I've bought from them were in good  condition. Younger wines try the supermarkets and buy online to avoid the risk of overheating on shelves. Anything over 20 years I'd always go for the old school merchants, BBR,  Lay and Wheeler, Seckford, they'll discuss provenance.

Richard Dane posted:

We have various vintages of Ch. Musar and Hochar for sale in the local village shop. It's become a bit pricier than I remember from the days when I bought it cheaply from Majestics back in the '80s and '90s. 

The price is definitely in a different range, but that reflects what's happened to fine wines, the days of buying 1985 vintage 5th growth clarets from Oddbins for well under a tenner are long gone, in the context of its reputation and genuine quality it's still a relative bargain.

Eoink posted:

I've had a real soft spot for Larose since I got into claret in the mid-'80s, when Cordier owned it. 2nd last of  a case, old school claret, pencil graphite, drying tannins from the vintage, a lovely cassis/darker fruit palate, and Gruaud dirt with fruits on the nose. I like this style of claret a huge amount,  went well with lamb in red wine and rosemary (although I had to make sure I didn't have any with the lettuce/fennel/radish/ginger/garlic/vinaigrette salad). Now going well with the end of the Stevie Ray/Albert King CD. I've not been impressed with most 21st century Laroses I've tasted, this feels a bit like the last of the slightly clumsy but loveable claret I knew. 

Very nice, one of my father in laws favourites, sadly no longer with us. Love your description perhaps try Chateau Talbot also owned by the Cordier family - I have some '09 & will post when I try it.

Plain old Merlot for me, but very drinkable.

NFG posted:
Eoink posted:

 

...

Very nice, one of my father in laws favourites, sadly no longer with us. Love your description perhaps try Chateau Talbot also owned by the Cordier family - I have some '09 & will post when I try it.

Plain old Merlot for me, but very drinkable.

Oddly enough I got a mail from a merchant today selling a private cellar, and it had '09 Talbot. Sadly it was a double-magnum, so I  resisted. Look forward to hearing about yours. Tonight an interesting choice, a 2010 Brunello bought earlier today from Lidl when I popped infor a couple of red peppers. Not a vin de garde, drinking now for 2 or 3 years, nice sour cherries, soft tannins, high alcohol comes through on the palate. a warming wine. I'm having it on its own while I rip today's CD stash, not convinced it would have gone with the chili I had for dinner, but it'd be great with a red meat stew. A bit clumsy, but very enjoyable, reasonable value, but not a 2010 to lay down. I'm still planning to keep the three 2010s I have in the cellar for at least another 5 years.

Eoink posted:
NFG posted:
Eoink posted:

 

...

Very nice, one of my father in laws favourites, sadly no longer with us. Love your description perhaps try Chateau Talbot also owned by the Cordier family - I have some '09 & will post when I try it.

Plain old Merlot for me, but very drinkable.

Oddly enough I got a mail from a merchant today selling a private cellar, and it had '09 Talbot. Sadly it was a double-magnum, so I  resisted. Look forward to hearing about yours. Tonight an interesting choice, a 2010 Brunello bought earlier today from Lidl when I popped infor a couple of red peppers. Not a vin de garde, drinking now for 2 or 3 years, nice sour cherries, soft tannins, high alcohol comes through on the palate. a warming wine. I'm having it on its own while I rip today's CD stash, not convinced it would have gone with the chili I had for dinner, but it'd be great with a red meat stew. A bit clumsy, but very enjoyable, reasonable value, but not a 2010 to lay down. I'm still planning to keep the three 2010s I have in the cellar for at least another 5 years.

Lidl do seem to have a good range of wine, Ive not had a bad bottle from ours in Fontenay le Comte, they even stock La Tour Blanche - one of my favourite Sauternes.

sorry this is slightly out of topic but its related i think. i have bought some not-so-cheap wines lately and found that when i try to open it with a cork-screw thingy -- the cork just disintegrated and the brittle bits then just fell into the wine. some were so bad i was forced to return the bottle(s) -- and then you get funny looks, perhaps suggesting i was complaining about nothing.

what causes this brittle cork issue and am i correct to fuss about it ?

enjoy

ken

ken c posted:

sorry this is slightly out of topic but its related i think. i have bought some not-so-cheap wines lately and found that when i try to open it with a cork-screw thingy -- the cork just disintegrated and the brittle bits then just fell into the wine. some were so bad i was forced to return the bottle(s) -- and then you get funny looks, perhaps suggesting i was complaining about nothing.

what causes this brittle cork issue and am i correct to fuss about it ?

My understanding is that corks that are brittle have dried out, and may allow air to pass through so that the wine deteriorates. Wine racks store bottles on their side to prevent this as the wine keeps the cork moist. If you're in any doubt that the wine was as good as it should have been, I think you should talk to the seller, and on the rare occasions when I've done this, I have always been offered a replacement or refund with absolutely no hesitation or 'funny looks!'

A rather enjoyable morning at Chateau Siaurac & a fair few euros lighter before my O/H extracted me. The route to Neac through Pomerol & along the D121 lined with many vineyards including Petrus. Chateau gardens very nice too .

The second wine, Plaisir de Siaurac is also very good.

Keler Pierre posted:

i am drinking now some Romanee Conti Grand Cru, with some coca cola and chips. Quite good...

Im sure it goes well with just about anything!

I have a friend with a nice cave au vin, when he was in hospital for a week & his wife made a boeuf bourguignon for his return & searched out a nice bottle...

The bourguignon, it did taste good!

Yes, it was a Romanee Conti that would cost, oh perhaps 1200 euros

The rest are locked up now.

Morey St Denis Les Sorbes 2013 Domaine Michel Noëllat. Two firsts for me, my first Les Srobes (as far as I can remember) and my first year of drinking anything from this domaine (I did try a 2013 Savigny a few weeks ago, so this is my second ever bottle). 

Still in its early drinking window, nice cherry and violet palate, slightly earthy cherry nose (I have chilled it slightly  because it's very warm here). I'm lucky to have a good local wine merchant who's started stocking Noëllat after giving up on the prices of the top domaines, I got 3 bottles of each of this and the Savigny on his recommendation. It's a classy Burgundy, not world-class wine making, but very very good, and you could probably buy 3 of this for the price of one Roumier Boussière these days. Good clear fruit, light use of oak, enjoyable wine. I'll pick up another 6 I think, drink the 2 I have in their youth, look to drink the other half case when it's through its closed period in the early '20s.

if you're looking for a classy young Burgundy without paying the prices for the great domaines, this is a pretty good choice.

We discovered Grüner Veltliner when we were in Vienna last December. It's a super white, not too strong at 12.5% and with a lovely peppery taste. This one is from the Wine Society, and is a perfect summer evening wine, which we'll shortly be drinking with a tomato and goat's cheese tart. Apparently it's a very trendy wine at the moment - we just drink it because we like it. 

NFG posted:
Keler Pierre posted:

i am drinking now some Romanee Conti Grand Cru, with some coca cola and chips. Quite good...

Im sure it goes well with just about anything!

I have a friend with a nice cave au vin, when he was in hospital for a week & his wife made a boeuf bourguignon for his return & searched out a nice bottle...

The bourguignon, it did taste good!

Yes, it was a Romanee Conti that would cost, oh perhaps 1200 euros

The rest are locked up now.

i was joking, the romanee conti is very expensive wine, so chips and cola...but bœuf bourguignon, no problem, very good choice.

Keler Pierre posted:
NFG posted:
Keler Pierre posted:

i am drinking now some Romanee Conti Grand Cru, with some coca cola and chips. Quite good...

Im sure it goes well with just about anything!

I have a friend with a nice cave au vin, when he was in hospital for a week & his wife made a boeuf bourguignon for his return & searched out a nice bottle...

The bourguignon, it did taste good!

Yes, it was a Romanee Conti that would cost, oh perhaps 1200 euros

The rest are locked up now.

i was joking, the romanee conti is very expensive wine, so chips and cola...but bœuf bourguignon, no problem, very good choice.

I was tempted to reply saying that coca-cola was a terrible match with Romanee-Conti, everyone knew you cut Romanee-Conti with Sprite, La Tache worked better with Diet Coke, and Richebourg was the perfect match with Coca Cola, but I was scared I might be taken seriously. 

Eoink posted:
Keler Pierre posted:
NFG posted:
Keler Pierre posted:

i am drinking now some Romanee Conti Grand Cru, with some coca cola and chips. Quite good...

Im sure it goes well with just about anything!

I have a friend with a nice cave au vin, when he was in hospital for a week & his wife made a boeuf bourguignon for his return & searched out a nice bottle...

The bourguignon, it did taste good!

Yes, it was a Romanee Conti that would cost, oh perhaps 1200 euros

The rest are locked up now.

i was joking, the romanee conti is very expensive wine, so chips and cola...but bœuf bourguignon, no problem, very good choice.

I was tempted to reply saying that coca-cola was a terrible match with Romanee-Conti, everyone knew you cut Romanee-Conti with Sprite, La Tache worked better with Diet Coke, and Richebourg was the perfect match with Coca Cola, but I was scared I might be taken seriously. 

when i was young, in holidays, camping with friends, we used to cut cheap wine with coca cola, it was just easier to drink.  Now, sometimes, i drink bordeaux good wine with some good french cheeses and french baguette:  simple but very pleasant and tasty.  I have never drunk romanee conti....just see on google that is one of the most expensive wines...

Another bottle of '93 Musar, after this 2 left of this and 2 of the '91, might be time to open a '97 soon. Still very classy, earthy tannins, some cherry and a lot of blue fruit, as normal with aged Musar, the wine changes through the drinking time, sometimes almost tight and closed with fruit/tannin power, this one has shown only a few mouthfuls  of that style and instead is showing lovely perfumed fruits in most mouthfuls. Great wine.

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