When was the last concert you went in 2017

Gary Shaw posted:
Black Sabbath - O2 London

Wonderful. My expectations were high and they were easily exceeded - the sound was amazing (like a giant dinosaur stomping around the place), the playing astonishing (I never realised what a phenomenal bassist Geezer was) and even Ozzy's voice (never a thing of grace and splendour) stood up to the hour and fifty minutes well. For such a huge barn, the atmosphere was great.

More importantly they played everything I'd hoped, mostly from the early albums (handy, as Ozzy's voice now suits the lower registers of the 1st album much better): Setlist here

Spectacular finale, with cascades of large black and purple balloons filled the arena (quickly punted up onto the stage) and an amazing purple ticker tape shower as the band closed out with a storming Paranoid (cue the appearance of Geezer's Villa bass).

A couple of very minor grumbles: the two women in front of me who barely looked at the stage, concentrating on taking selfies of each other and bellowing into each others ears (not that I could hear them), and the drum solo - went on far too long even though it was technically amazing (he drummed like Animal).
I was also impressed by the fact that it was the youngest audience I've been in for ages. Really surprised me how many young people were there.
 
Thought Rival Sons were OKish - I'd have been much more impressed if I'd never heard Led Zep II, Machine Head et al. Could have done with a decent bunch of tunes. Singer had a good pair of pipes though.

Could not agree with you more Gary.  I have to say this was one of the best gigs I have been to.  Yes the audience was a bit restless, in my day we would have been totally out of our heads and needed one of the straight guys to get us back to the flat.  That was the advantage of living on campus rather than out in the sticks somewhere.

Big Bill posted:
Gary Shaw posted:

Fairport Convention - Assembly Rooms, Tunbridge Wells

We catch them most years here, as they're just about the only decent band to come to this venue, but this year's 50th tour show was something special. Sally Barker, who'd sung with the briefly reformed Fotheringay a couple of years ago was support and she had a lovely voice - perfect for when she joined the band later for Rising For The Moon and the usual Meet On The Ledge closer.

The band are so tight these days (a dramatic contrast to their early 70s incarnation) especially the harmonies that would be ideal if someone could get them to cover something from American Beauty! This was especially magical for a rare outing of Genesis Hall.

Which brings me to Sandy. When we first got re-acquainted with the modern-day Fairport just over 20 years ago, it was a jarring experience to hear Simon Nichol sing Sandy's songs but now it seems quite natural the hear his baritone carry them so well. Even so I find myself hearing her sing along with him in my head. 

They were clearly having great fun and the music showed it. Great stuff.

I was at Uni in 1969 and heard them play and Sandy just blew me away with her voice as did the rest of the band.  I have always thought that Richard Thompson is one of the best guitarists around.  ps they were very psychedelic in those days!

I saw them in '70 just after Full House came out, and just before Thompson left, at The Town & Country Club, Belsize Park. They gave a thoroughly robust set built around Full House during which there was a veritable bucket chain of beer between the bar and the stage. By now completely soused, they proceeded to give a rollicking encore of rock n' roll standards that lasted  over a hour. Magnificent, if rough as a badger's a**e!

Gary Shaw posted:
Big Bill posted:
Gary Shaw posted:

Fairport Convention - Assembly Rooms, Tunbridge Wells

We catch them most years here, as they're just about the only decent band to come to this venue, but this year's 50th tour show was something special. Sally Barker, who'd sung with the briefly reformed Fotheringay a couple of years ago was support and she had a lovely voice - perfect for when she joined the band later for Rising For The Moon and the usual Meet On The Ledge closer.

The band are so tight these days (a dramatic contrast to their early 70s incarnation) especially the harmonies that would be ideal if someone could get them to cover something from American Beauty! This was especially magical for a rare outing of Genesis Hall.

Which brings me to Sandy. When we first got re-acquainted with the modern-day Fairport just over 20 years ago, it was a jarring experience to hear Simon Nichol sing Sandy's songs but now it seems quite natural the hear his baritone carry them so well. Even so I find myself hearing her sing along with him in my head. 

They were clearly having great fun and the music showed it. Great stuff.

I was at Uni in 1969 and heard them play and Sandy just blew me away with her voice as did the rest of the band.  I have always thought that Richard Thompson is one of the best guitarists around.  ps they were very psychedelic in those days!

I saw them in '70 just after Full House came out, and just before Thompson left, at The Town & Country Club, Belsize Park. They gave a thoroughly robust set built around Full House during which there was a veritable bucket chain of beer between the bar and the stage. By now completely soused, they proceeded to give a rollicking encore of rock n' roll standards that lasted  over a hour. Magnificent, if rough as a badger's a**e!

Yeah think I know what you mean but never been that close to a badger!

Lewis and Leigh, last night, Eden Court theatre, Inverness.  A truly wonderful evening; great songs, beautifully sung and played in an acoustically excellent venue.  The only slight disappointment was that only around 70 folk came out for the experience but at least I was one of them!

Catch these guys if you can (if you like their style of music, that is).

Cheers,

Ian

Hi Fang

2 gigs at the O2 & then the very last at the NEC

start to finish was a minimum of 110% from Sabbath

good crowd reactions as well, the crowd goes way up past number 10 in Brum

Sabbath in Brum is a combination that's hard to beat.

sound - obviously loud, its a rock concert

tony's guitar hard a real good n dirty sound to it, and he sure knows how to make that thing sing

geezer's bass and the drums were thunderous, the bass was going down to places even my active dbls cant find.

ozzy was great with the crowd and the crowd was great, must say the crowd in Brum were twice as loud and half as many.

hats off also to the drummer tommy from Rob Zombie, played like a man possessed and looked like it too, remember the drummer from the muppets, well you've got the picture.

Did actually feel as though we were part of something for the last one, a bit more special than the other gigs, seen these more times than I can remember.

 

I can appreciate some of the previous comments regarding sound quality issues at Leeds, ive not been to Leeds but have had similar issues at Ally Pally and as for Brixton that is so terrible I woudnt go back there to see anyone, even Hendrix back from the dead for one night only.

 

They came to rock and that's exactly what they did !

 

lyndon

 

 

 

5th February, Cadagan Hall, Sloane Square.

Richard Thompson solo acoustic. It amazes me that this guy just gets better and better. A truley excellent gig, he was on top form plus. Late added Support from Emily Barker, as singer from sceduled group Wildwood Kin was ill.

Looking forward to Trifonov tomorrow. Hope I will be sufficiently recovered to go, as I need to travel ....the combination of Trifonov and Gergiev sounds exciting to me..

 

Rachmaninow: Die Klavierkonzerte I

Mariinsky Orchester St. Petersburg
Daniil Trifonov, Klavier

Philharmonie
Fr., 10. Februar 2017
20:00 Uhr

Rachmaninow: Die Klavierkonzerte I
Mariinsky Orchester St. Petersburg
Daniil Trifonov, Klavier
Valery Gergiev, Leitung

Auch in Abos Bravissimo, Daniil Trifonov spielt Rachmaninow, Pianissimo

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Rachmaninow: Die Klavierkonzerte I

Rachmaninow: Konzert für Klavier und Orchester Nr. 1 fis-moll op. 1
Rachmaninow: Rhapsodie über ein Thema von Paganini op. 43 für Klavier und Orchester
Rachmaninow: Symphonie Nr. 1 d-moll op. 13

Kein anderer Pianist versetzt die Klassikwelt derart in Aufruhr wie Daniil Trifonov. Der 25-Jährige aus Nischni Nowgorod beehrt München im Februar als Protagonist eines fulminanten, vier Konzertabende umfassenden Rachmaninow-Zyklus. Unter der Leitung von Valery Gergiev präsentieren das Mariinsky Orchester St. Petersburg und die Münchner Philharmoniker sämtliche Klavierkonzerte und Symphonien des Spätromantikers. Den Münchnern sind diese Konzertreihen – wie Schostakowitschs Symphonien (2011/12) oder der Strawinsky-Zyklus (2013/14) – noch in lebendiger Erinnerung. „Die ausverkaufte Philharmonie stand Kopf“, berichtete die Abendzeitung über den Abend der St. Petersburger mit Trifonovs unvergleichlicher Interpretation von Strawinskys Konzert für Bläser und Klavier. Nun also Rachmaninow: Beginnend mit der 1. Symphonie über die triumphalen Klavierkonzerte bis zu den Symphonischen Tänzen aus dem Jahr 1940, in denen epische Melodiebögen und dramatische Klangballung zum letzten rauschenden Fest laden. Als der Komponist den jungen Horowitz mit seinem Werk brillieren hörte, soll er übrigens Erleichterung gezeigt haben: Nun müsse er es endlich nicht mehr selbst spielen. Was hätte er wohl über den genialen Trifonov gesagt? Die Kritik weltweit ist sich einig: Hier herrscht emotionale Seelenverwandtschaft. Trifonov ist der legitime Erbe, wenn es heißt, Oktaven und Akkorde explodieren zu lassen und zugleich mit filigraner Leichtigkeit tief in das schimmernde Geheimnis der Werke einzutauchen. Für den Pianisten selbst war Rachmaninow immer „eine Brücke, die mich mit Russland verbunden hat.“

Mariinsky Orchester St. Petersburg
Daniil Trifonov, Klavier
Valery Gergiev, Leitung

 

The Trifonov concert was really great. He is so intense in his playing. I especially like the Rhapsodie over a theme of Paganini. But also the 1st piano concert was very well played.

it was also the first time I saw Gergiev live and it was not a dissapointed. I will see that I get some photos published later...

The B-52's and Simple Minds. Hordern Pavilion in Sydney, Australia, February 9th.
B-52's tremendous fun and a great, tight band with great musicianship. Most enjoyable.
Simple Minds just superb. Jim Kerr really entertains and they played hit after hit after hit.

Bert Schurink posted:

The Trifonov concert was really great. He is so intense in his playing. I especially like the Rhapsodie over a theme of Paganini. But also the 1st piano concert was very well played.

I'll be seeing him play next month at the Orchestra Hall, too. Perusing next season's program, Trifonov is becoming Chicago's favourite next to Kissin. Gergiev/Mariinsky also will make an appearance next season but with Denis Matsuev. ( playing Prokofiev #2 )

BUDAPEST FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA
Iván Fischer Conductor
Richard Goode Piano

All Beethoven:
Symphony No.1
Piano Concerto No.2
Symphony No.5

I am somewhat familiar with their team work via their Grammy nominated complete Beethoven Piano Concertos which I didn't think much of Goode's playing. But when I saw them touring the US, I was curious to hear him to find out he's actually that dull. ( as in the CD )

In my mind, PC2 needs Mozart like transparency and polish and sense of fun where Goode's playing utterly lack. ( or at least I did not hear it ) He misplayed a note but that's not my problem. I just don't see his goody two shoes straight playing is right for Beethoven's piano pieces. I think that was the same *problem* I had with his rest of concertos.

OTOH, I very much enjoyed Fischer/Budapest Festival Orchestra performance of Beethoven Symphonies. No.1 might have lacked a bit of polish or subtleties, but they were coherent, rhythmic had a very nice warm bottom weighted tonal quality  which gave them a very much grounded friendly disposition. This chunky earthy quality was perfect for the 5th along with Fisher's excellent tension management, giving the score somewhat of traditional approach but extremely emotional drama. ( 'struggle-to-conquest' segment should be played this way for the max impact, IMHO ) Particularly from the tail end of Scherzo to a triumphant final movement and finale making this one of my most memorable moving concert I have ever attended. They almost sounded like Lenny/NYP's 5th. But much nimbler. 

Interestingly it was a complete opposite direction from Muti took a month earlier with CSO where Muti did not use much of dynamic shading nor use of rubato but pushed it through via sheer speed and tsunami like forward momentum. They are both viable interpretation but for a stronger more compelling story telling, I feel Fischer/Budapest Festival had an edge.

I hope they'll visit us again.

Here's an interview with Ivan Fischer on Beethoven.

Bert Schurink posted:

The Trifonov concert was really great. He is so intense in his playing. I especially like the Rhapsodie over a theme of Paganini. But also the 1st piano concert was very well played.

it was also the first time I saw Gergiev live and it was not a dissapointed. I will see that I get some photos published later...

So now with picture. The conducting of Gergiev is quite special. With hands and fingers. They will continue in München with the Rachmaninov cycle, a pity that I don't life in München otherwise I would have also visited the others of the cycle.

Bert Schurink posted:

The Trifonov concert was really great. He is so intense in his playing. I especially like the Rhapsodie over a theme of Paganini. But also the 1st piano concert was very well played.

Trifonov's Rach 1 was indeed terrific. I was very much taken by his intensity yet a certain lyricism throughout. This is the performance I attended back in 2015. ( with Semyon Bychkov/CSO ) The finale certainly brought down the house.

He'll be playing the Rach 2 next season with Zweden/CSO.

kuma posted:
Bert Schurink posted:

The Trifonov concert was really great. He is so intense in his playing. I especially like the Rhapsodie over a theme of Paganini. But also the 1st piano concert was very well played.

Trifonov's Rach 1 was indeed terrific. I was very much taken by his intensity yet a certain lyricism throughout. This is the performance I attended back in 2015. ( with Semyon Bychkov/CSO ) The finale certainly brought down the house.

He'll be playing the Rach 2 next season with Zweden/CSO.

It's that I don't live in München otherwise I would have taken his all Rachmaninov package. He will Tuesday play the last concerto .....

Capital Theatre, Horsham, Saturday 18th Feb:-

Another in a now long list of 'Tribute" bands we have seen. This time Money For Nothing, unsurprisingly a Dire Straits version. A six piece with a quite young (30s) lead guitar and singer the Mark Knopfler of the band. He swallowed his words a little but it didn't spoil enjoyment. Foe a change the sound level was just right, and everyone seemed to enjoy themselves.

Chuck Prophet and the Mission Express - Rescue Rooms, Nottingham.

Not as good as the last three times I've seen him at the same premises, he seems to be a bit more of a "showman" now and I feel he doesn't play as much guitar. I'm not familiar with his new album either but still great entertainment from Chuck and his highly competent band.

I saw Chuck Prophet & Co last night at the Tunnels in Bristol. I haven't seen him live since he was in Green On Red but I certainly enjoyed it. His new album is very good (checked it out on Tidal) and the tracks already evolving into excellent live material.

Great band as well - recommended!

Benjamin Grosvenor:

Program:
Schumann: Arabesque, Op. 18
Mozart: Sonata No. 13 in B-flat Major, K. 333
Beethoven: Sonata in C-sharp Minor, Op. 27, No. 2 (Moonlight)
Scriabin: Sonata No. 2 in G-sharp Minor, Op. 19 (Sonata-Fantasy)
Granados: Selections from Goyescas
Liszt: Rhapsodie espagnole

[ENCORE]
Moszkowski:
Etude in A-flat Major, Op. 72, No. 11
Kapustin: Etude in E Minor, Op. 40, No. 3

This is his Chicago debut recital with smorgasbord of virtuosic tunes.

The first half of recital started off with soft and tender Schmann's Arabesque and finished with Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata ( personally I wish he would have picked more interesting later Sonatas )

Ho hum. He sounded very stiff and mechanical with not much flair on both Schumann or Mozart pieces. I felt that his left had was way too heavy making the tunes too bottom weighted. Mozart K.333 sounded *wrong* because of it. Moonlight equally lacklustre albeit it's pretty tough to make this nauseatingly familiar piece fresh. It is not my favourite piece and out of dozens I have heard to date, Kempf's '65 performance is just about the only one that moves me. These pieces are not particularly difficult to play but to make insightful interpretations is much harder to pull off especially in a recital live situation, I reckon.

Second half, as I expected, faired a lot better. Fiery yet opulent Scriabin and rhythmic and bold Granados pieces showed his excellent technical skills and virtuosity. He turned on a *it's 'show time'* mode. Liszt Rhapsodie Espagnole just about brought down the house. It was impressive particularly considering he's only 24 years old. He certainly did not let the Chicago audience down. 

Brit Floyd at the Lowry Theatre, Salford on their Immersion 2017 tour. A recreation of the Division Bell tour with an incredibly good light show accompanied by film clips. Sound quality and levels were excellent as was the standard of musicianship. Only slightly marred by a complete row of simpletons chattering away ten to the dozen.

Looking forward to the Japanese Nobu Tsjuii this evening with a varied recital program. This will be the first time I will experience a concert and even more so hearing him...

Program is:

Johann Sebastian Bach: Italienisches Konzert F-Dur BWV 971
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Klaviersonate Nr. 17 B-Dur KV 570
Ludwig van Beethoven: Klaviersonate Nr. 14 cis-Moll op. 27 Nr.2 "Mondscheinsonate"
Ludwig van Beethoven: Klaviersonate Nr. 23 f-Moll op. 57 "Appassionata"

 

 

kuma posted:

Benjamin Grosvenor:

Program:
Schumann: Arabesque, Op. 18
Mozart: Sonata No. 13 in B-flat Major, K. 333
Beethoven: Sonata in C-sharp Minor, Op. 27, No. 2 (Moonlight)
Scriabin: Sonata No. 2 in G-sharp Minor, Op. 19 (Sonata-Fantasy)
Granados: Selections from Goyescas
Liszt: Rhapsodie espagnole

[ENCORE]
Moszkowski:
Etude in A-flat Major, Op. 72, No. 11
Kapustin: Etude in E Minor, Op. 40, No. 3

This is his Chicago debut recital with smorgasbord of virtuosic tunes.

The first half of recital started off with soft and tender Schmann's Arabesque and finished with Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata ( personally I wish he would have picked more interesting later Sonatas )

Ho hum. He sounded very stiff and mechanical with not much flair on both Schumann or Mozart pieces. I felt that his left had was way too heavy making the tunes too bottom weighted. Mozart K.333 sounded *wrong* because of it. Moonlight equally lacklustre albeit it's pretty tough to make this nauseatingly familiar piece fresh. It is not my favourite piece and out of dozens I have heard to date, Kempf's '65 performance is just about the only one that moves me. These pieces are not particularly difficult to play but to make insightful interpretations is much harder to pull off especially in a recital live situation, I reckon.

Second half, as I expected, faired a lot better. Fiery yet opulent Scriabin and rhythmic and bold Granados pieces showed his excellent technical skills and virtuosity. He turned on a *it's 'show time'* mode. Liszt Rhapsodie Espagnole just about brought down the house. It was impressive particularly considering he's only 24 years old. He certainly did not let the Chicago audience down. 

I hope I soon have an opportunity to see him live. I expected him to do better as your comments seem to indicate. Perhaps he just didn't have his evening...

Bert Schurink posted:

Looking forward to the Japanese Nobu Tsjuii this evening with a varied recital program. This will be the first time I will experience a concert and even more so hearing him...

Program is:

Johann Sebastian Bach: Italienisches Konzert F-Dur BWV 971
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Klaviersonate Nr. 17 B-Dur KV 570
Ludwig van Beethoven: Klaviersonate Nr. 14 cis-Moll op. 27 Nr.2 "Mondscheinsonate"
Ludwig van Beethoven: Klaviersonate Nr. 23 f-Moll op. 57 "Appassionata"

 

 

The concert was quite good. Bach was perfect, Mozart missed a bit the dynamics, so was a bit weak. Beethoven was again good. He had besides some standard encores a self composed piece for Tsunami victims which was also very nice. So all in all a good evening.

Bert Schurink posted:

I hope I soon have an opportunity to see him live. I expected him to do better as your comments seem to indicate. Perhaps he just didn't have his evening...

Jury is still out on Grosvenor for me. I've one CD by him but my impression on him was 'good but not great'.  He seems to be a sort of artist who covers a lot but does not do anything particularly well. Technical excellence these days are not a rare skill amongst young piano player so in order to be exceptional, one needs to go beyond it.

Kings of Leon at the Newcastle Metro Arena.

Don't know why I keep going back to this venue, as the sound was terrible again.

The music was good though, although the lighting was poor to me. Too much back lighting, and whilst 'moody/arty' looking, it left the band in silhouette nearly all the time. Good mix of old and new songs, but they were 10 songs in before there was any talking to the crowd. I always like bands that interact with the crowd more.

Left a little disappointed, and certainly wasn't as good as when I saw them at the City Hall years ago. Smaller venues are much better for me.

Nigel

Went to see Angela Gheorghiu yesterday in Cilea's Adriana Lecouvreur, in London. With modern concepts dominating many opera houses, it was refreshing to see the opera as the period piece that it is. Outstandingly well sung by all principals involved, including Brian Jagde (new to me) and a superb Gerald Finley as Michonnet. Gheorghiu continues to look and sound beautiful, still in command of that creamy voice that makes her stand out from the pack. The opera itself is ridiculous even by opera standards but hugely entertaining, with several show-stopping moments.

Should have waited for autographs, but foolishly common sense took over - had to catch the early plane home.

Cheers

EJ

Niall Kelly and James Forster (South London's best guitarist - he has a touch of the Dickie Betts about him) on 12th February at the BBBC (that's the Balham Bowls Club). Almost 90 minutes of mellow blues, jazz and rock - a mixture of covers and original tunes, including the debut of a superb Niall newie, "The Letter".

16th February - Ese & The Vooduu People returned to the Old Dispensary in Camberwell, South London. Various technical issues meant the set had to be truncated after less than quarter of an hour, but the band returned for an 70 minutes' worth of blistering power trio soul-rock. Among the highlights was the live debut of a new song, "How to Spot A Sociopath".

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