winky's new bike!

DSC_3797 Ti Ti downtube detail

 

DSC_3794

Seat and post - SLR Flow Kit Carbonio and Enve carbon post

 

DSC_3862

 

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Sweet Columbus carbon gravel fork. First build for Sam using this fork. It's really pretty

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Industry Nine hubs and rims. Straight-pull bladed spokes with 2:1 lacing on rear

 

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Here she is. Dura-ace hydro disc. Enve carbon cockpit.

Custom built for winky by this guy.....

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Sam Whittingham, the master. Built by hand in his workshop-in-the-forest-by-the-bay up on beautiful Quadra Island. Can't get much more "westcoast" than that. Check out his work at nakedbicycles.com.

Winky

Original Post
winkyincanada posted:
Clive B posted:

Very nice, Winky. Dura-ace is a bit serious for cyclo-cross type riding! Enjoy it!

It's worse than that, Clive. I'm going to be commuting on it. In the rain. With lights and fenders.

"Life is too short to ride $h!+ bikes".

OK, Winky, of course I understand.  And besides, as I've posted on here before, the ideal number of bikes to own is n+1, where n is the number currently owned.

naim_nymph posted:

What tubing is it made from?

It's looks every bit a very tasty custom built machine, hope it rides as well as it looks!

How much has it all cost you?

Debs

 

It a titanium tubeset. Not sure of the brand or specs. I left that to the builder after we had discussed the way I would use the bike. I'll PM you on the cost.

Tabby cat posted:

Very nice Winky.

Love that Chris King headset on it.......I can see your a man of fine tastes

What gear ratios are you useing ? 

Enjoy !

Compact 50/34 and 30-11 on that wheelset. The "gravel wheels" (not pictured) have a 32-11.

The CK headset was an easy choice. I could also have gone CK hubs, but they're expensive and a bit tricky to service. The i9s are also a great hub, cost less and it is dead easy to replace the bearings on them.

winkyincanada posted:
Clive B posted:

Very nice, Winky. Dura-ace is a bit serious for cyclo-cross type riding! Enjoy it!

It's worse than that, Clive. I'm going to be commuting on it. In the rain. With lights and fenders.

"Life is too short to ride $h!+ bikes".

Very nice bike winky. Very probably very nice, even with lights and fenders in the rain !

Hey Winky congratulations on the new bike!  

Checked out the website and the tour around the site was informative and impressed with the products and testimonials. It looks like you made a fantastic investment in a sport that you enjoy.

Enjoy your commuting and be safe out there......

It's a nice blend of traditional well proven features plus a few well though out 21st century bits in the mix.

The 12mm tho axles have some excellent engineering to locate with on the frame dropouts.

Winky, i see the frame has fixing points on seat-stay bridge and folk crown, do you intend to use mudguards [or do you call them 'fenders' over there?] and have a particular brand in mind?

Is this your bike with the 'gravel wheels'?  

 

What a cassic and beautiful bike. 

Love the paint scheme. 

 

My bike from today. The Chris King rear hub is from 2003. I have not changed the bearings yet. I open the hub twice every year, uses a cloth to clean te inside and apply new oil. Use the hub tool perhaps every second year. Front hub is new this year since the fork uses the boost standard. 

naim_nymph posted:

It's a nice blend of traditional well proven features plus a few well though out 21st century bits in the mix.

The 12mm tho axles have some excellent engineering to locate with on the frame dropouts.

Winky, i see the frame has fixing points on seat-stay bridge and folk crown, do you intend to use mudguards [or do you call them 'fenders' over there?] and have a particular brand in mind?

Is this your bike with the 'gravel wheels'?  

 

That IS indeed my bike. Where did you get that photo? Sam hasn't put them up yet. I'm impressed with your sleuthing. Yep, those are the other wheels. Orange hubs. The rims are a bit wider and have 40mm Maxxis tyres on them.

Yes fenders for the Vancouver winter commute and winter club-rides. The fenders (mudguards) are ordered but still to arrive. Not sure of the brand, but they're nothing fancy.

Eloise posted:

I’m curious though Winky... did they run out of the grey paint and the green was all they had around to finish it? :-)

Seriously though... enjoy the bike

Thanks. The grey isn't paint but the bead-blasted raw titanium. Your question should have been "Did they run out of green paint?"

winkyincanada posted:
 

That IS indeed my bike. Where did you get that photo?

It's from the nakedbicycles dot com web-site on the home page...

at the bottom of page amid a line of little images that can be clicked on to enlarge : )

<>

Meanwhile:

I'm very much enjoying a Trek Silque SLR 6 i purchased new in May this year 

Photo in my profile - stuff i love

naim_nymph posted:
winkyincanada posted:
 

That IS indeed my bike. Where did you get that photo?

It's from the nakedbicycles dot com web-site on the home page...

at the bottom of page amid a line of little images that can be clicked on to enlarge : )

<>

Meanwhile:

I'm very much enjoying a Trek Silque SLR 6 i purchased new in May this year 

Photo in my profile - stuff i love

That bottle of chain oil standing there on the carpet makes nervous!

So glad you posted that as I am having a love-in with Ti bikes at the moment; see below. I'd also been giving the forum a break for a couple of months but you have sucked me back.

Much as bare metal looks great (and lasts well) I do like a bit of colour with a Ti frame. I like your choice, I think the metal looks lovely with the green. I like the seriously hourglass profiled seat stays, and details like the bottle cages that match the curves well. I'm not quite there with discs for on road use myself. I'm guessing yours is going to get more all-surface use. Incidentally I've run CK hubs on a wheelset for 3 years now and hardly had to adjust them.

I just completed my new custom Ti Moots Vamoots. My 'bad weather' road bike until now was an eastern European Ti frame from Ebay that was fine as far as it went but did not really fit me. My three road bikes now all have identical custom geometry.

The frame has etched decals in gold for a bit of bling, the standard matt Moots finish and matt carbon Ritchey bars, post and stem plus the Moots standard Enve fork. Wheels are Ritchey too (not new for this bike) and the groupset is Campag Chorus. Saddle Fizik-as per all my other bikes. Headset is from Tune not CK as it matched the gold colour better. Shallow eh.

Have now added Raceblades and a good coating of road muck. The ride is impressive, very tight and surprisingly snappy compared to my old one, yet with that great Ti suppression of 'buzz'. As with all American bikes with current exchange rates it was not cheap but it is very, very lovely and the build quality is fantastic. I already have a Moots YBB MTB so I knew what to expect from them.

 

Bruce

Bruce Woodhouse posted:

So glad you posted that as I am having a love-in with Ti bikes at the moment; see below. I'd also been giving the forum a break for a couple of months but you have sucked me back.

Much as bare metal looks great (and lasts well) I do like a bit of colour with a Ti frame. I like your choice, I think the metal looks lovely with the green. I like the seriously hourglass profiled seat stays, and details like the bottle cages that match the curves well. I'm not quite there with discs for on road use myself. I'm guessing yours is going to get more all-surface use. Incidentally I've run CK hubs on a wheelset for 3 years now and hardly had to adjust them.

I just completed my new custom Ti Moots Vamoots. My 'bad weather' road bike until now was an eastern European Ti frame from Ebay that was fine as far as it went but did not really fit me. My three road bikes now all have identical custom geometry.

The frame has etched decals in gold for a bit of bling, the standard matt Moots finish and matt carbon Ritchey bars, post and stem plus the Moots standard Enve fork. Wheels are Ritchey too (not new for this bike) and the groupset is Campag Chorus. Saddle Fizik-as per all my other bikes. Headset is from Tune not CK as it matched the gold colour better. Shallow eh.

Have now added Raceblades and a good coating of road muck. The ride is impressive, very tight and surprisingly snappy compared to my old one, yet with that great Ti suppression of 'buzz'. As with all American bikes with current exchange rates it was not cheap but it is very, very lovely and the build quality is fantastic. I already have a Moots YBB MTB so I knew what to expect from them.

 

Bruce

Seriously nice. Moots have always been a class act. The gold touches are great. I love that you've gone with Campagnolo. That's where my heart is and I've ridden nothing-but since 1984, with the exception of one Shimano Dura-Ace Trek in the middle. My previous two road bikes (A C59 and BMC Pro-machine - still have them) are Campagnolo. The Naked is my first Shimano bike in 13 years, as I wasn't ready to take a punt on Campagnolo's very first disc-brake groupset. There are aspects of Shimano ergonomics that are definitely behind Campagnolo, although some things are admittedly better. Functionally, it's about even in my view. Aesthetically, Campagnolo leaves Shimano in the dust (mud?).

I looked seriously at Moots as an option for my bike, but they were surprisingly expensive, and in the end I preferred a local, smaller builder in the end.

My choice of discs was more due to the amount of wet-weather riding I do, rather than the gravel duties. I commute every day, regardless of weather, all year-round. The winters are wet, here in Vancouver. Rim brakes just don't work as well in the wet (and wear out rims at a dramatic rate), and so I found myself limiting my routes to where there wasn't a lot of hard downhill braking. This meant missing out on some great riding through the winter.

fatcat posted:

Winky.

It’s a nice looking bike, but spoiled by one thing IMO. The garish wheel decals. Is it possible to remove them.

If not you should be charging the wheel manufacture for advertising space.

 

 

I don't disagree. I'd prefer something less obvious for sure. I've not looked into removing them, but will!

pt109 posted:

A Cervelo C3. I mostly do the same ride daily, and here in the Montreal area, roads are noticeably getting worse each passing year, so I needed something more comfy.

Nice. I've heard really good things about that frameset. I love that it doesn't have slidy, springy, rattly, or kinked bits like many new carbon "all-road" frames.

winkyincanada posted:
Bruce Woodhouse posted:

So glad you posted that as I am having a love-in with Ti bikes at the moment; see below. I'd also been giving the forum a break for a couple of months but you have sucked me back.

Much as bare metal looks great (and lasts well) I do like a bit of colour with a Ti frame. I like your choice, I think the metal looks lovely with the green. I like the seriously hourglass profiled seat stays, and details like the bottle cages that match the curves well. I'm not quite there with discs for on road use myself. I'm guessing yours is going to get more all-surface use. Incidentally I've run CK hubs on a wheelset for 3 years now and hardly had to adjust them.

I just completed my new custom Ti Moots Vamoots. My 'bad weather' road bike until now was an eastern European Ti frame from Ebay that was fine as far as it went but did not really fit me. My three road bikes now all have identical custom geometry.

The frame has etched decals in gold for a bit of bling, the standard matt Moots finish and matt carbon Ritchey bars, post and stem plus the Moots standard Enve fork. Wheels are Ritchey too (not new for this bike) and the groupset is Campag Chorus. Saddle Fizik-as per all my other bikes. Headset is from Tune not CK as it matched the gold colour better. Shallow eh.

Have now added Raceblades and a good coating of road muck. The ride is impressive, very tight and surprisingly snappy compared to my old one, yet with that great Ti suppression of 'buzz'. As with all American bikes with current exchange rates it was not cheap but it is very, very lovely and the build quality is fantastic. I already have a Moots YBB MTB so I knew what to expect from them.

 

Bruce

Seriously nice. Moots have always been a class act. The gold touches are great. I love that you've gone with Campagnolo. That's where my heart is and I've ridden nothing-but since 1984, with the exception of one Shimano Dura-Ace Trek in the middle. My previous two road bikes (A C59 and BMC Pro-machine - still have them) are Campagnolo. The Naked is my first Shimano bike in 13 years, as I wasn't ready to take a punt on Campagnolo's very first disc-brake groupset. There are aspects of Shimano ergonomics that are definitely behind Campagnolo, although some things are admittedly better. Functionally, it's about even in my view. Aesthetically, Campagnolo leaves Shimano in the dust (mud?).

I looked seriously at Moots as an option for my bike, but they were surprisingly expensive, and in the end I preferred a local, smaller builder in the end.

My choice of discs was more due to the amount of wet-weather riding I do, rather than the gravel duties. I commute every day, regardless of weather, all year-round. The winters are wet, here in Vancouver. Rim brakes just don't work as well in the wet (and wear out rims at a dramatic rate), and so I found myself limiting my routes to where there wasn't a lot of hard downhill braking. This meant missing out on some great riding through the winter.

Thanks Winky

My first proper bike was a s/h Colnago with Campag and I've continued to ride only that ever since on all my road frames. I swap wheels around between bikes so having different systems would be a pain, ditto having discs on one bike and not the others.

The Ritchey wheels in the photo have a black anodized coating to the braking surface which makes wet weather braking quite a lot better than usual, especially with the right pads. Dry weather stopping is really sensational. It is wearing through in places though so not a perfect solution.

Bruce

Bruce Woodhouse posted:

Thanks Winky

My first proper bike was a s/h Colnago with Campag and I've continued to ride only that ever since on all my road frames. I swap wheels around between bikes so having different systems would be a pain, ditto having discs on one bike and not the others.

The Ritchey wheels in the photo have a black anodized coating to the braking surface which makes wet weather braking quite a lot better than usual, especially with the right pads. Dry weather stopping is really sensational. It is wearing through in places though so not a perfect solution.

Bruce

Those hardened, textured rims are indeed just fabulous in terms of braking. Durable, too - but as you say, not perfect. They certainly close the gap to discs in my view. With direct-mount, hydraulic calipers, they would likely match discs in power and modulation. I have a Mavic Exalith set which were awesome, and am currently using a Campagnolo set (can't recall their marketing name for the treatment) which were slightly less awesome and are wearing a bit more quickly. An added bonus of the hardened rims is that the super-hard brake pads last forever!

That I wanted bigger tyres than I could get on my Colnago was one of the main reasons for the n+1 bike. Discs just make that easier. For 40mm tyres, it's virtually your only choice. I actually don't see the two bikes overlapping much in terms of use.

winkyincanada posted:
Bruce Woodhouse posted:

Thanks Winky

My first proper bike was a s/h Colnago with Campag and I've continued to ride only that ever since on all my road frames. I swap wheels around between bikes so having different systems would be a pain, ditto having discs on one bike and not the others.

The Ritchey wheels in the photo have a black anodized coating to the braking surface which makes wet weather braking quite a lot better than usual, especially with the right pads. Dry weather stopping is really sensational. It is wearing through in places though so not a perfect solution.

Bruce

Those hardened, textured rims are indeed just fabulous in terms of braking. Durable, too - but as you say, not perfect. They certainly close the gap to discs in my view. With direct-mount, hydraulic calipers, they would likely match discs in power and modulation. I have a Mavic Exalith set which were awesome, and am currently using a Campagnolo set (can't recall their marketing name for the treatment) which were slightly less awesome and are wearing a bit more quickly. An added bonus of the hardened rims is that the super-hard brake pads last forever!

That I wanted bigger tyres than I could get on my Colnago was one of the main reasons for the n+1 bike. Discs just make that easier. For 40mm tyres, it's virtually your only choice. I actually don't see the two bikes overlapping much in terms of use.

I have Mavic wheels with the Exalith surfaces. They’re very good and I like the noise. I’m not keen on disks on a road bike. The Dura Ace calipers are superb and better than the cable operated disk brakes on my winter bike.

Wugged Woy posted:

Better not let Don see this thread......................................................... bl@@dy cyclists !!!!  

Oh, and Winky, a beautiful bike indeed  

Too late Woy !

Winky was willing to pay 20p per mile to cycle to work in the rain.....

.... and now we all appreciate why  ! Small price to pay to glide through Stanley Park on his new head-turning people-mover !

 

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