winky's new bike!

Drewy posted:
winkyincanada posted:
Bruce Woodhouse posted:

Thanks Winky

My first proper bike was a s/h Colnago with Campag and I've continued to ride only that ever since on all my road frames. I swap wheels around between bikes so having different systems would be a pain, ditto having discs on one bike and not the others.

The Ritchey wheels in the photo have a black anodized coating to the braking surface which makes wet weather braking quite a lot better than usual, especially with the right pads. Dry weather stopping is really sensational. It is wearing through in places though so not a perfect solution.

Bruce

Those hardened, textured rims are indeed just fabulous in terms of braking. Durable, too - but as you say, not perfect. They certainly close the gap to discs in my view. With direct-mount, hydraulic calipers, they would likely match discs in power and modulation. I have a Mavic Exalith set which were awesome, and am currently using a Campagnolo set (can't recall their marketing name for the treatment) which were slightly less awesome and are wearing a bit more quickly. An added bonus of the hardened rims is that the super-hard brake pads last forever!

That I wanted bigger tyres than I could get on my Colnago was one of the main reasons for the n+1 bike. Discs just make that easier. For 40mm tyres, it's virtually your only choice. I actually don't see the two bikes overlapping much in terms of use.

I have Mavic wheels with the Exalith surfaces. They’re very good and I like the noise. I’m not keen on disks on a road bike. The Dura Ace calipers are superb and better than the cable operated disk brakes on my winter bike.

I agree. While I'm not in the market for a new road bike to replace my Colnago C59; If I was, I would likely not seriously consider discs. Although modern rim brakes are superb, they all give up a bit in the wet (and with Exaliths much less-so), and they don't accommodate larger tyres. This bike is for a different purpose.

winkyincanada posted:
Drewy posted:
winkyincanada posted:
Bruce Woodhouse posted:

Thanks Winky

My first proper bike was a s/h Colnago with Campag and I've continued to ride only that ever since on all my road frames. I swap wheels around between bikes so having different systems would be a pain, ditto having discs on one bike and not the others.

The Ritchey wheels in the photo have a black anodized coating to the braking surface which makes wet weather braking quite a lot better than usual, especially with the right pads. Dry weather stopping is really sensational. It is wearing through in places though so not a perfect solution.

Bruce

Those hardened, textured rims are indeed just fabulous in terms of braking. Durable, too - but as you say, not perfect. They certainly close the gap to discs in my view. With direct-mount, hydraulic calipers, they would likely match discs in power and modulation. I have a Mavic Exalith set which were awesome, and am currently using a Campagnolo set (can't recall their marketing name for the treatment) which were slightly less awesome and are wearing a bit more quickly. An added bonus of the hardened rims is that the super-hard brake pads last forever!

That I wanted bigger tyres than I could get on my Colnago was one of the main reasons for the n+1 bike. Discs just make that easier. For 40mm tyres, it's virtually your only choice. I actually don't see the two bikes overlapping much in terms of use.

I have Mavic wheels with the Exalith surfaces. They’re very good and I like the noise. I’m not keen on disks on a road bike. The Dura Ace calipers are superb and better than the cable operated disk brakes on my winter bike.

I agree. While I'm not in the market for a new road bike to replace my Colnago C59; If I was, I would likely not seriously consider discs. Although modern rim brakes are superb, they all give up a bit in the wet (and with Exaliths much less-so), and they don't accommodate larger tyres. This bike is for a different purpose.

I really do need disc brakes for my winter bike, road conditions change dramatically around here during the winter months, too damp or right puddled up, far too muddy in too many places, and disc wheels have the advantage of more clearance above the tyres [ even using 700 x 32 tyres ] so clods of mud, grit, and the wet can slush right though without scraping, brake callipers tend to fail this exercise by not having enough room for mudguards which cause clogging up with mud especially around the brake blocks, and there's also the problem with wet weather grit grinding between brake-blocks and rims. So discs & mudguards for winter is the essential combination IME, However i'm very impressed with the Ultegra direct mount callipers on my summer bike which have an excellent feel to the braking performance, and weight-saving of around half a kilo compared to a disc bike.

Debs

winkyincanada posted

I agree. While I'm not in the market for a new road bike to replace my Colnago C59; If I was, I would likely not seriously consider discs. Although modern rim brakes are superb, they all give up a bit in the wet (and with Exaliths much less-so), and they don't accommodate larger tyres. This bike is for a different purpose.

Interesting the comments about disc brakes from Deb's and Winky.They sound like a good option if the terrain and weather the bike is being used in is demanding.I am quite old school and on my Focus Cyclo cross bike I use cantilevers which are effective and on my road bike a Klein -callipers.Happy with both.Although with a road bike I am a bit of a old school purist and think discs on wheels just don't look right to my eyes.

There are pics of my 2 bikes in my profile.

Colnago C59   Winky very nice.Always lusted after Colnago ever since the early 80' s when I saw a Master Pui in red with full art decor paint job.Stunning.

They asked Bradley Wiggins in an interview what is your favourite bike of all time  ? and he said a Colnago C40 for what it represented at the time when Carbon was new on the market and it's handling and race heritage during the EPO fueled 90' s when Mapei where getting 1-2 -3 at Paris Roubaix on C40 's.

As Deb's says great thread on the forum lots to share with like minded cyclists

 

Tabby cat posted:
winkyincanada posted

I agree. While I'm not in the market for a new road bike to replace my Colnago C59; If I was, I would likely not seriously consider discs. Although modern rim brakes are superb, they all give up a bit in the wet (and with Exaliths much less-so), and they don't accommodate larger tyres. This bike is for a different purpose.

Interesting the comments about disc brakes from Deb's and Winky.They sound like a good option if the terrain and weather the bike is being used in is demanding.I am quite old school and on my Focus Cyclo cross bike I use cantilevers which are effective and on my road bike a Klein -callipers.Happy with both.Although with a road bike I am a bit of a old school purist and think discs on wheels just don't look right to my eyes.

There are pics of my 2 bikes in my profile.

Colnago C59   Winky very nice.Always lusted after Colnago ever since the early 80' s when I saw a Master Pui in red with full art decor paint job.Stunning.

They asked Bradley Wiggins in an interview what is your favourite bike of all time  ? and he said a Colnago C40 for what it represented at the time when Carbon was new on the market and it's handling and race heritage during the EPO fueled 90' s when Mapei where getting 1-2 -3 at Paris Roubaix on C40 's.

As Deb's says great thread on the forum lots to share with like minded cyclists

 

 

DSC_4733-Edit

This is the C59. It's been flawless. If I was shopping for a replacement, a C60 would definitely be on the list.

I know what you mean about the the aesthetics of discs on road bikes, but I'm getting used to them.

And this is my previous bike (which I still have).

DSC_8584

Thanks for posting Winki your C59 looks understatedly  stylish.

What does it check out weight wise ?

You probably do but a great cycling channel on Youtube is Global Cycling Network

Well worth checking out there always testing new kit and giving advice on all things cycling a great resource.

Tabby cat posted:

Thanks for posting Winki your C59 looks understatedly  stylish.

What does it check out weight wise ?

You probably do but a great cycling channel on Youtube is Global Cycling Network

Well worth checking out there always testing new kit and giving advice on all things cycling a great resource.

I'm not sure of the weight but it is pretty light. The frame isn't the lightest out there, but the rest of the kit is very light. The BMC is a hair lighter (by feel) due to the frame weight, I think. The C59 is a more solid, but slightly buzzier ride. The BMC has more BB flex, is comfier (for a race bike) and is slightly less confident in fast corners, perhaps, but overall there's not much in it.

Great looking bikes Winky!  I too have a colnago c59 which I've had for quite a while and see no reason to change as it just feels right for me.  Also think the c59 looks better than the (presumably technically better) c60.  I run with manual campy record and mavic c40 wheels which have a carbon braking surface.  I much prefer the logic and feel of campy gearshifts to shimano.  I have dura ace on my now commuter which I have owned for 10 years and it continues to work flawlessly (the frame on the spesh Roubaix pro has not disintegrated yet either!).  The campy and fulcrum (same company) black coated braking surfaces caused a bit of a stir over here in UK with many dissatisfied customers complaining about the coating wearing through in a very short space of time.  These were mostly rejected as warranty claims due to them being used in wet weather - the very reason for buying them!!  It seems that mavic worked out the formula for surface coating more thoroughly than campy.

I suspect that disc brakes are still a bit in the vhs vs beta max stages of development and I look forward to them becoming a bit better integrated in the design for road bikes.  I can't really see the downside to them once the aesthetics are improved - better performing and I hate the waste of chucking out factory made wheelsets with perfectly functional hubs just because the braking surface wears out.  Only downside to this is that I now have several sets of wheels which will offer many years to come before they fail - indeed I suspect I will fail before they do!!

Important thing about all these wonderful bikes is to get out and ride them!  I have a trek madone 6 series set up on a tacx neo turbo trainer in anticipation of the not too distant cold wet winter weather which I so often dodge.  I've even bought a dyson fan but still wonder if that will be sufficient to drag me to the monotony of a turbo trainer!!

Peter

northpole posted:

Great looking bikes Winky!  I too have a colnago c59 which I've had for quite a while and see no reason to change as it just feels right for me.  Also think the c59 looks better than the (presumably technically better) c60.  I run with manual campy record and mavic c40 wheels which have a carbon braking surface.  I much prefer the logic and feel of campy gearshifts to shimano.  I have dura ace on my now commuter which I have owned for 10 years and it continues to work flawlessly (the frame on the spesh Roubaix pro has not disintegrated yet either!).  The campy and fulcrum (same company) black coated braking surfaces caused a bit of a stir over here in UK with many dissatisfied customers complaining about the coating wearing through in a very short space of time.  These were mostly rejected as warranty claims due to them being used in wet weather - the very reason for buying them!!  It seems that mavic worked out the formula for surface coating more thoroughly than campy.

I suspect that disc brakes are still a bit in the vhs vs beta max stages of development and I look forward to them becoming a bit better integrated in the design for road bikes.  I can't really see the downside to them once the aesthetics are improved - better performing and I hate the waste of chucking out factory made wheelsets with perfectly functional hubs just because the braking surface wears out.  Only downside to this is that I now have several sets of wheels which will offer many years to come before they fail - indeed I suspect I will fail before they do!!

Important thing about all these wonderful bikes is to get out and ride them!  I have a trek madone 6 series set up on a tacx neo turbo trainer in anticipation of the not too distant cold wet winter weather which I so often dodge.  I've even bought a dyson fan but still wonder if that will be sufficient to drag me to the monotony of a turbo trainer!!

Peter

One of the differences between the Mavic and Campag/Fulcrum braking surfaces is the direction of the surface grooves. Mavic's run across the brake track, and I think are thus more likely to knock out pieces of grit from in the brake pads (or at least file them down). However, in contrast, the circumferential grooves in the Campag/Fulcrum wheels seem to allow a pieces of grit to stay there, scribing scratches around the rim. It was pretty early on the that the first shiny circular  scratch appeared on my Shamals, followed by, eventually, a general wearing out of the black surface treatment. The instruction say to check regularly for pieces of embedded grit, but the sense I get is that with the right (wrong?) piece of grit, the scratches can happen pretty much straight away. The Mavics have definitely been more durable, although both wheelsets have been great, and all my rim-brake wheels will have this sort of surface treatment from now on. Probably go back to Mavic, although I just love the Shamals in every other way. They just look a bit naff now, with "discoloured" brake tracks.

Based on the experience of my new bike, I think discs have arrived. They work great, although the wet-weather squealing is annoying. The front pads initially seemed to rub a little (sometimes) so I aligned the caliper (30 second job with an allen key) and it is perfect now. There is more clearance to the pads than I thought there would be, although leaves and bits of detritus did seem to lodge in the caliper on my very wet ride home last week, causing noise, but no issues. Bear in mind the roads were half-flooded and absolutely covered in fallen leaves so it was a "worst case" test.

northpole posted:

Important thing about all these wonderful bikes is to get out and ride them!  I have a trek madone 6 series set up on a tacx neo turbo trainer in anticipation of the not too distant cold wet winter weather which I so often dodge.  I've even bought a dyson fan but still wonder if that will be sufficient to drag me to the monotony of a turbo trainer!!

My BMC teammachine has been hooked onto my Wahoo turbo trainer for 6 weeks. I can thoroughly recommend Zwift as a motivation to get on the bike indoors. Completely addictive and really does make the time in the pain cave less painful.  I have done a few ‘group’ rides and am nearly at the point of giving a race a go!

Just make sure you do an FTP test early on (even if your turbo trainer doesn’t have a power meter - Zwift will estimate power based on the trainer itself and your weight); as this will allow you to ride with similar ability riders (from all over the world!).

give it a go

Tabby cat posted:

Beautiful pic Winky.Wow  ! what stunning scenery - must be a very up lifting commute to work.I am lucky on mine as its on a cycle path parallel with the coast for 4 miles but no way as scenic as yours.

Pleased the bike is bringing you much pleasure

 

Robson-St-older-pic-Vancouver.BC-Vacouver.ca

Careful what you wish for Tabby Cat.

This is typical of much of winky's route (Robson) . You can't see the driver of the grey car, but she is talking on her mobile phone,  whilst eating a sandwich and applying her make-up ! At least, according to winky, based on his posts elsewhere. And this picture captured the scene at 07:30 on a Sunday morning. Imagine what it would be like on a Monday morning at 08:30 !!!!

But winky's picture does capture the spirit of the North Shore, Lions Gate Bridge and Stanley Park which cover the rest of his route, so it's not quite as bad as winky often makes out 

Don Atkinson posted:
Tabby cat posted:

Beautiful pic Winky.Wow  ! what stunning scenery - must be a very up lifting commute to work.I am lucky on mine as its on a cycle path parallel with the coast for 4 miles but no way as scenic as yours.

Pleased the bike is bringing you much pleasure

 

Robson-St-older-pic-Vancouver.BC-Vacouver.ca

Careful what you wish for Tabby Cat.

This is typical of much of winky's route (Robson) . You can't see the driver of the grey car, but she is talking on her mobile phone,  whilst eating a sandwich and applying her make-up ! At least, according to winky, based on his posts elsewhere. And this picture captured the scene at 07:30 on a Sunday morning. Imagine what it would be like on a Monday morning at 08:30 !!!!

But winky's picture does capture the spirit of the North Shore, Lions Gate Bridge and Stanley Park which cover the rest of his route, so it's not quite as bad as winky often makes out 

I actually just have three city blocks along West Hastings as part of my 25km commute (and I could bypass that by staying down on the foreshore). I was scolded by a motorist this morning for rolling slowly through a stop sign over on Bellevue. She must get very tired of having to scold the 99.999% of road users who do exactly the same. Or perhaps she reserves her scolding only for cyclists.

Cycle Wheels and Hubs JPEG

A Wheel Fallacy.

The cycle wheel in the diagram (fitted with Maxxis tyres) makes one complete revolution in travelling from A to B.

It is somewhat obvious the length of the line AB is precisely the same as the circumference of the cycle wheel.

The hub of the cycle wheel (i9s) also makes one complete revolution along the imaginary line CD. And it is plain to see that AB = CD

Some people therefore seem to think that the length of the line CD must also be precisely the same as the circumference of the hub. But clearly, this is a fallacy.

There is no question that the hub makes one (and only one) complete revolution in travelling from C to D. But how do you explain that CD is not equal to the circumference of the hub ?

Don Atkinson posted:

Cycle Wheels and Hubs JPEG

A Wheel Fallacy.

The cycle wheel in the diagram (fitted with Maxxis tyres) makes one complete revolution in travelling from A to B.

It is somewhat obvious the length of the line AB is precisely the same as the circumference of the cycle wheel.

The hub of the cycle wheel (i9s) also makes one complete revolution along the imaginary line CD. And it is plain to see that AB = CD

Some people therefore seem to think that the length of the line CD must also be precisely the same as the circumference of the hub. But clearly, this is a fallacy.

There is no question that the hub makes one (and only one) complete revolution in travelling from C to D. But how do you explain that CD is not equal to the circumference of the hub ?

For the tyre, the tangential velocity (when measured from the point of reference of the hub) will be equal to linear speed of the wheel, or the tyre must slip on the road. The relative velocity of the tyre and the road is zero (the tangential and linear velocities exactly cancel) at the point of contact for no sliding. The hub has no such constraints. The tangential velocity of the hub is less than that of the tyre (for the rame rpm) as the radius is smaller but it doesn't matter that it doesn't match the speed of the wheel. The the hub essentially "slides" along.

TOBYJUG posted:

Scientists,mathematicians and other boffins can not still explain fully why we don't simply fall over when on a bicycle in motion.

That's an urban myth. It has been explained. The steering is the key. The bike rider is able to steer the wheels back under the centre of gravity. The geometry of the steering is set up to assist this making the bike somewhat self stabilising.

What DOESN'T contribute is the gyroscopic effect. This was proved by building a bike with counter-rotating masses to cancel out the effect. It was still perfectly rideable. This is also supported by the rideability of bikes with really small and light wheels. But you can't ride bike with no steering.

winkyincanada posted:
TOBYJUG posted:

Scientists,mathematicians and other boffins can not still explain fully why we don't simply fall over when on a bicycle in motion.

That's an urban myth. It has been explained. The steering is the key. The bike rider is able to steer the wheels back under the centre of gravity. The geometry of the steering is set up to assist this making the bike somewhat self stabilising.

What DOESN'T contribute is the gyroscopic effect. This was proved by building a bike with counter-rotating masses to cancel out the effect. It was still perfectly rideable. This is also supported by the rideability of bikes with really small and light wheels. But you can't ride bike with no steering.

You can ride a bike without steering, just not as far and you may tip over more often........

naim_nymph posted:
winkyincanada posted:

  

DSC_3899

Here she is. Dura-ace hydro disc. Enve carbon cockpit.

 

 

It's been over a month now so how's the new bike going?

Are you happy with it?

My new bike will be ready sometime next week : )

Debs

Really good. The disc brakes are noisier in the wet than I’d hoped (and it has been VERY wet), but everything has been great. I’ve put in about 1400km so far.

naim_nymph posted:
winkyincanada posted:

  

DSC_3899

Here she is. Dura-ace hydro disc. Enve carbon cockpit.

 

 

It's been over a month now so how's the new bike going?

Are you happy with it?

My new bike will be ready sometime next week : )

Debs

What bike are you getting? Sorry if I missed it earlier in the thread.

winkyincanada posted:
naim_nymph posted:
winkyincanada posted:

  

DSC_3899

Here she is. Dura-ace hydro disc. Enve carbon cockpit.

 

 

It's been over a month now so how's the new bike going?

Are you happy with it?

My new bike will be ready sometime next week : )

Debs

Really good. The disc brakes are noisier in the wet than I’d hoped (and it has been VERY wet), but everything has been great. I’ve put in about 1400km so far.

A smudge of Coppaslip (anti-seize compound) or even some grease on the back of the brake pads might stop the brake squeal. It lasts for several months when I have done it. Why some squeal and others don't is a mystery to me. Pads not held tightly enough?

Bruce

winkyincanada posted:

What bike are you getting? 

It's a factory off the peg 52cm size carbon fibre, the only similarity to yours is dura ace disc brakes/STI levers : )

Bruce, thanks for the coppaslip idea, will probably use it.

Plus perhaps some anti-biotics for those 'STI' levers?  

 

Bruce Woodhouse posted:

A smudge of Coppaslip (anti-seize compound) or even some grease on the back of the brake pads might stop the brake squeal. It lasts for several months when I have done it. Why some squeal and others don't is a mystery to me. Pads not held tightly enough?

Bruce

I'd heard that tip, but with grease. I'm not sure I want sticky stuff inside my calipers and around the pistons. The build up of road debris in the calipers is bad enough as it is.

winkyincanada posted:
Bruce Woodhouse posted:

A smudge of Coppaslip (anti-seize compound) or even some grease on the back of the brake pads might stop the brake squeal. It lasts for several months when I have done it. Why some squeal and others don't is a mystery to me. Pads not held tightly enough?

Bruce

I'd heard that tip, but with grease. I'm not sure I want sticky stuff inside my calipers and around the pistons. The build up of road debris in the calipers is bad enough as it is.

Coppaslip is commonly used on the back of motor vehicle brake pads for the same preventive seize, squeal, judder reasons so should be good for bicycles too, albeit the dinky size of the pads. My old Synapse Ultegra brake pads squealed so loudly when wet it was more than slightly embarrassing.

I was rather hoping the lated Dura Ace version discs would be fine, but from what you report maybe not...

I ordered my new bike on Monday. Bespoke. Not a familiar bespoke manufacturer, but definitely unique.

I visited the production centre today and took a few photos. Although it is basically complete, it does need some slight adjustment before I am prepared to accept it. I did mention the squealing brakes that both Debs and winky are suffering from. The bike builder assured me that I won't be able hear my brakes squeal.

I'll post a couple of pictures once I have uploaded them to Flickr.

Bike Factory

Well, this morning we drove the 65 miles through beautiful rolling Wiltshire countryside to the small, secluded estate where this bike has been manufactured. We didn't get to meet directly with the manufacturing artisan, who I understand can be somewhat "laid-back" to the point of lazyness. His order-book has a 12 month lead time, but once he gets going, he knocks things out in no-time, a couple of days at most !

Mrs D considered the estate and more so the bike, to be more a work of art than simply the masterly bringing together of modern technology, and in a way, I can see her point of view. The bridge in the foreground, which forms part of the relaxing estate is a reminder of our infrastructure heritage but serves no useful purpose other than as a focus point when viewing the artificial lake and folly beyond.

Anyway, I digress. The bike !......see next post.

Likes (3)
naim_nymphTabby catjoerand
×
×
×
×