????...WHO..?

Posted by: Peder on 22 July 2018

....... WILL TAKE OVER.. ?

???? Had the privilege to see a legend last night...Graham Nash.? 
This above wrote Dan Steel in the Concert thread just now.

I started thinking,..have had that idea before,too.
Think all these great artists.......

?The Rolling Stones.
? David Bowie.
? Rod Stewart
? Paul McCartney.
? Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits.
? Bryan Adams.
? Elton John.
? Joe Cocker.
? Eric Clapton.
? Lionel Richie.
? Stevie Wonder.
? Paul Simon.
? Kenny Rogers.
? James Ingram
? Tina Turner
? Billy Joel.
? Michael Jackson.
? Diana Ross.
? Dionne Warwick.
? Willie Nelson.
? Al Jarreau.
? Bruce Springsteen.
? Kenny Loggins.
? Steve Perry.
? Daryl Hall.
? Huey Lewis.
? Cyndi Lauper
? Kim Carnes.
? Bob Dylan.
? Ray Charles.
? Harry Belafonte.
? Lindsey Buckingham.
? Bob Geldof.
? Bill Gibson.
? Chris Hayes.
? Waylon Jennings.
? Bette Midler.
? John Oates.
? Smokey Robinson.
? Aretha Franklin.
? Phil Collins.
? Ray Cooper.
? john Illsley.
? Midge Ure.
? Red Dwight.
? Howard Jones.
? Niel Young.
? Gunís & Roses.
? AC/DC.
? Led Zeppelin.
? John Fogerty.
? Cher.
? Queen.
etc,etc,etcÖÖ.. 

All of these have played for decades,from at least 1960 onwards.
True artists and musicians,who have gone the long way and learned their "profession" from the ground and up,and grown through experience. Played at small clubs,worn their own loudspeakers and amplifiers....learned to have audience contact and slowly grown as an artist and human.

Most of them operate even today in different ways,some are out on their farewell-tour.....Elton John,Paul Simon etc.
Cher is coming soon with a new album.!

They are all also at least 60-75 years old ????, and "Still Going Strong".

Also see in this music tip threads here, many,many tips on music from just these older times......1960 onwards..
????Mine a little depressing thought is,....WHO should take over from these artists and bring the flag forward.?
Have the capacity to fill World Stadiums for decades....not I think it's Justin Bieber anyway ????.

As I see it,we need these artists who have the capacity to fill World Stadiums,..it helps other artists to come forward.
I remember when Bruce Springsteen pulled in over Sweden 1985 with the "Born in The USA Tour"...all of Sweden lived up,it was written in the newspapers for weeks about this.!!

So my maybe a little gloomy faith in the future is,while the hifi interest decreases.....
? Where are we heading really.?
? Who wants this "mainstream" music produced today.?
? Who will take over the musical baton and fill World Stadiums in the future as....

- John Fogerty
- Gunís & Roses
- Rolling Stones
- Tina Turner
- Freddie Mercury,QUEEN

With several great artists done for decades.?

Timeless music that lasts for generations,is not forgotten after a few months,or a year.

Just a thought this Sunday afternoon.....

/Peder ????

Posted on: 22 July 2018 by Florestan

Your list largely covers artists who established themselves between 1960 and roughly 1985.  In every case, these are people/groups that started at the bottom and worked their way to the top.  They worked hard but more importantly they had at least some level of talent.  Their stature today continues because of the void in talent that followed this period.  This fact will continue.

Basically, your list covers the Baby Boomers (The ME Generation).  The void that follows are the Gen X, Y, & Z's and onward.  This is simply my opinion but I think one can draw a clear link explaining the progression in time after the Baby Boomer time frame and the race to the bottom that follows.

To be clear, non of us will ever see the likes of your list such as The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, The Who, Bob Dylan etc. appear as a similar force from any Gen X'er onward.  Other than a few exceptions which could be named I haven't seen any evidence that even remotely looks like the 60's / 70's gave us.  Just my humble opinion.

Posted on: 22 July 2018 by Dan Steel

Must admit in the last 12 months I havenít bought a lot of new material. Iíve been buying and playing a lot of old stuff from way back jazz to rock etc. It maybe Iím more selective in what I buy or I havenít been impressed with any of the new stuff I donít know or Iíve got that much stuff itís time to spend time listening to it.

Music has changed in how we listen to it ok the vinyl has made a comeback but most people enjoy their music through streaming and cd and like to flick through track after track. Unlike me who likes to listen to a whole side then get off my arse and turn the music over.

The Beatles, Dylan, Springsteen, Mitchell are legends to me but so is Miles, Coltrane and Muddy Waters, Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry and many more I could add to your list. Classic lovers will go back further and call Bach, Beethoven etc legends.

The thing we all have in common is our love for music. ????

Posted on: 22 July 2018 by Nick Lees

I think there is more very good music being made these days than ever. I buy between 30 and 40 albums each month - the vast majority of which is ďnewĒ - that is recently made, even if the genre was invented in the 60s.

However, I also think there is nowhere near the amount of great music being made.

Partly because most of us grew up when Jazz, rock and pop boundaries were being smashed on a yearly basis and standards set (though this is backed up by the number of younger people who love ďoldĒ music. Youngsters like 50 year-old Stones and Beatles in a way that Iíd have found shocking in 1967 (I couldnít dream of liking Al Bowly!).

The problem with a lot of good music these days is that itís drowned at birth. Few big labels supporting them, they rely on Bandcamp to eke a level at which they can release the next album. 

Are there new stars being borne who this generation will revere? If so, theyíll probably be something like Grime artists (look out for Lady Leshurr), a genre that Iíve tried but simply do not get at all. Bit weíre not supposed to...as much as I long for a new Zappa or Hendrix thatís gone.

Posted on: 22 July 2018 by Kevin-W
Nick Lees posted:

Are there new stars being borne who this generation will revere? If so, theyíll probably be something like Grime artists, a genre that Iíve tried but simply do not get at all.

Me too. I heard some Stormzy recently, it just sounds like a pissed-up bloke getting aggressive outside a kebab shop on a Friday night... bloody awful!

And I listen to Throbbing Gristle for pleasure!

Posted on: 22 July 2018 by Nick Lees

Quite Kevin, I was playing Cluster II loud last night and any self-respecting youngster (and letís face it oldsters too) would consider ďa racketĒ.

Posted on: 22 July 2018 by TOBYJUG

UK jazz artists right now are doing amazing things that should be looked into by everyone, not just audiophiles.

Greatness can be contested of course. In the late 70s America decided it didn't like Disco and preferred REO Speedwagon instead.

Posted on: 22 July 2018 by joerand

Red Hot Chili Peppers and Green Day. Both can fill a stadium. Granted, they're somewhat 'tweeners that appeal to both baby boomers and millennials, and probably not the 30-something-year-old artists you were looking for.

Posted on: 10 August 2018 by Peder

???????????????? WHO ????????????????

My list of older artists,in my first post above, can be supplemented with many,many artists from these older times.
On that list there are Stars,Superstars and Mega Superstars.

But as I wrote,...Who will take over and fill World Arenas for decades.?

????JOERAND wrote,..."Red Hot Chili Peppers and Green Day.Both can fill a stadium".

I agree,they are good,but they can probably not fill World-Arenas around the globe in 30-50 years.!!
Look at Cher (haven't listened so much to her), she's 72 years old...and comes in September with a new album.
And,..set up a Broadway Show, with premiere Sept. 3.
Just to name someone who was not on the list.

I think the music-industry needs to find another way to work,away with all these televised talent chases....they're sex-killing.!

????FLORESTAN wrote,....."Your list largely covers artists who established themselves between 1960 and roughly 1985. In every case,these are people/groups that started at the bottom and worked their way to the top. They worked hard but more importantly?they had at least some level of talent.?Their stature today continues because of the void in talent that follows this period.  This fact will continue."
 
Florestan,...besides this above,so I agree with everything you write in your post.
But Stars,Superstars and Mega Superstars are pulling other artists,and helping out new stars who struggle hard to knock through the world.

Take Tina Turner,a black woman in the United States at the 60's and 70's.It was The Rolling Stones from 1966,and later David Bowie who helped her out....so that she finally had the power to knock through the world over 1984.
Then she had already worked as a Live performer for 27 years.

Now Beyoncť tries to do the same with younger talent,...BUT,if we do not have so many artists at that level,so many new hard-fought artists with talent will not be helped.

It's one thing to be a great artist in your own country,we have many of them.But what I'm talking about here,....WHO,..will take over as World Artists,and be able to embark on Sold-Out World Tours for decades,..which includes from 125 to 258 concerts each time.
We do not have so many artists today that can cope that.

?Or,is this a time that we will never again get to experience.??

-------------------------------------------------------------

? ???????? ? ???????? ? ???????? ? ???????? 

I have for a few weeks amused me with watching concert videos from Youtube.
Fascinating to be able to see the Creedence Clearwater Revival live again,perform with "The Midnight Special,Fortunate Son" etc.

Where are such bands today.?

Or this guy,...they don't do artists like this any  longer ????.
Ignoring his private life,..watch this video.
With good headphones,or other equipment so you can feel the rhythm of the music.....shall be played loud ????????.

I put in two videos from the same performance,..one is "remastered".
I know which I think has the best sound quality, it will be interesting to hear which you think has the best sound quality....1 or 2.

???? At The 30th Anniversary Madison Square Garden,..New York. Song "Billie Jean" with Michael Jackson.

Below from "Billboard Magazine" ..???????????? 
????I would say Michael Jackson is the biggest Mega Star and than Tina Turner,but yes she is absolutely amazing...a QUEEN.!!
But here Ladies and Gentlemen,The Fantastic Michael Jackson....???????????? 

Video 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?...w2SXPS-4&sns=sms

Video 2,remastered. https://www.youtube.com/watch?...A3qQkqso&sns=sms

/Peder???? 

 

 

Posted on: 28 August 2018 by Peder

See that there is a lot,that refers to Michael Jackson in the various music-threads here.

Therefore,I am a bit surprised,..That no one has any opinion on the question I asked about the two music-video's I put into my post above.

I and many,many others add addresses to music-video's in different threads,....do you not listen to these.?
Myself,..I always try to find the video with the best soundquality before I put it in here,... sometimes you get to accept that the SQ is not so good.

But it is still interesting to watch,because it is usually the only opportunity to see these artists Live....especially if they have already left us.
Had myself,..a week ago an incredible evening, where I watched Stevie Ray Vaughan videos.
Much of this material has never been released on disc.

? These few artists,who reach the level "Mega Superstars",..they also have the ability to create a common feeling among the audience,..even at Sold-Out World Arenas.
Then it doesn't matter,if the audience is made up of 70 000 or 130 000 people.

Just look at the video in two versions,with Michael Jackson..as I added in the post above.

? Who,..Will Take Over.?
? Do you listen to uploads video's.
? Other free thoughts,that you have on the  subject.

Or,..is this a time that we will never again get to experience as Florestan said.

/Peder ????

Posted on: 04 October 2018 by Peder

             ???? STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN ???? 

         ????...WHO..?......Will Take Over ?

 I ask that question again,..I have no answer, however much I think,so it looks sparse among the coming artists.

As I have written earlier,..these Mega SuperStar-artists seem to be a dying generation.
Is it...
? The driving force that is missing.
? Talent.
? Is Today's artists for Comfortable.

Above some of many questions,..or is it wrong with the entire music industry?
Yes I do not know,but it becomes sparser and sparser in the artist trail that reaches these heights,and becomes SuperStars,..Mega SuperStars..

Many of the old SuperStars and Mega SuperStars are out on their farewell tours...and are between 70 and 80 years old.

After these,..Nothing.!

? I have not received any answer to my question about Michael Jackson's two music-videos above,so I presume that no one has listened...
It's boring,because we're quite a lot of people who put music-videos into different threads,..among other,"MusiCraft" that adds a new tip every day.

Here in Sweden we get a direct response to any music-video questions,but it may look different on an international forum.

????As you can see,..Heading in this post....Stevie Ray Vaughan,a RIP SuperStar.
I put in a video with Stevie Ray Vaughan and Johnny Copeland on stage,....this is incomparablely good.

Song,.."Tin Pan Alley",13 minutes long.

Do youself a favor and listen to this,..a SuperStar artist who unfortunately does not exist among us anymore.
The reactions in Sweden,of those who listened to this are,..Great,Unprecedented,World Class,etc....see video below????????

???? https://www.youtube.com/watch?...x-ekqZEo&sns=sms

/Peder???? 

 

 

 

Posted on: 04 October 2018 by Camlan

You could have made virtually the exact same post in 1962 and then what happened?

ĎThe sound of the hope of a generationí thatís what happened.

Posted on: 07 October 2018 by Peder

???? CAMLAN,....Here I disagree with you,we had incredibly many great artists in the 1950-century.

And those I enumerate in my first post,as well as many more,..were big in the 1960 and onwards.
But we have at least one lost generation of artists,..and later it became a time of electronic music.

It felt like musicians stopped playing real instruments and relied on "drum machines" "synthesizers" etc.,can this may have been a cause.
That many artists took the "simple wayĒ..and never learned to play for real.

?As an example,..What guitar-heroes do we have today.?

Former guitar-heroes such as Mark Knopfler, Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughan etc,it is still these that counts as the reference.

As I said,..at least one lost generation in Music.

To me,..it feels like all these "talent chases" on TV have taken over,short-term fame...then these artists fall into Oblivion.

Where are the upcoming SuperStars,..Mega SuperStars today.?

?Elton John and others are out on their farewell tours,Tina Turner comes with a new autobiography....and is going up with her musical on BroadWay.
Then,..when these Mega SuperStars do something,..
Yes then writing newspapers around the world, there are lots of interviews..TV appearances, Internet flooded by writings.

But then,..These Mega SuperStars are old,.....

????..WHO....?......Will Take Over ?

/Peder????

Posted on: 07 October 2018 by lutyens

Maybe the world of music has just become more varied and democratised in recent years. The punk attitude of 'I can do that' biting the so-called dinosaurs (many of whom have long outlived Punk or had the Punks join their ranks), has, with the likes of Bandcamp and true home recording, finally happened. We seem to have so many names for so many types of music all, it would seem, with their own loyal following that we no longer have a centre/focus on a handful of bands on a lesser number of genres. Radio also offers a much wider range of music too. It is no longer one radio station that we all listened in to, be that Caroline, AFN or John Peel for our alternative fix. R6M probably plays more in 24hours than John played in his week; nevermind the many internet stations that get mentioned on this forum.

There is still a lot of music out there and surely just as much if not more as there used to be. Frankly, Ewemon identifies more in each of his posts than I will be able to listen to. And we need to like all of it or even very much of it really. Those that will follow will follow loyally and that keeps the diversity alive.

I think music is pretty healthy and we should celebrate that diversity and not worry about any figurehead. If one comes along they will rise I am sure.

Posted on: 07 October 2018 by TOBYJUG

It is sadly true that today's greatest are just throwing together bits and pieces that catches the most common denominator.   

Westlife are set to reform as an " historically significant " band, with Ed Sheeran writing the songs, so it looks like the situation is going to get worse, and even more worse as time slips by.

Regardless there are many talented artists out right now that are starving hungry and in desperate need of a hot dinner.

Posted on: 07 October 2018 by AndyP19
Peder posted:

 

What guitar-heroes do we have today.?

 

You are having a laugh aren't you? I mean really you cannot be serious as John Mcenroe used to say. Oh I though you meant tennis players.... But let's stick on the Johns and J's for a start:

Johnny Marr 

Jonny Greenwood

John Petrucci

Joe Bonamassa

Jack White

OK more guitar heroes around today:

Derek Trucks

Susan Tedeschi

Graham Coxon

Slash

Guthrie Govan

Tom Morello

Rich Robinson

Nels Cline

Doyle Bramhall II

Kurt Vile

I'll stop there.....

Posted on: 07 October 2018 by Bob the Builder

The thought of going to see any of the people you mention PEDER fills me with dread and I could no more drag myself out into my back garden to see them than pay hundreds and hundreds of pounds for the pleasure.  Believe it or not the world didn't begin and end with the baby boomers most people under the age of 50 would find the sight of Mick Jagger the old fishgobbler doing his decrepit praying mantis routine to the words 'you make a dead man come' not only boring but quite cringe worthy.

It is a new world we live in where people have instant access to music and to concert videos there is no more mystique nor Kudos at going to see people performing anymore and if there is it is more about the event itself i.e Glastonbury rather than the performer like a DJ playing records by many different artists these festivals offer small bitesize performances before it's off to another stage and another artist.

As one of your stadium fillers once said 'the times they are a changing' and when Jagger is too decrepit to dance and his 60 and 70 something audience to old to hobble along to watch stadium filling artists will be no more and not because there are no new 'Guitar Heroes' to take there place but because there is not a market for them.

The rock and rolling baby boomers were of a time and that time will pass and don't even get me started on Michael Jackson.

Posted on: 07 October 2018 by French Rooster
AndyP19 posted:
Peder posted:

 

What guitar-heroes do we have today.?

 

You are having a laugh aren't you? I mean really you cannot be serious as John Mcenroe used to say. Oh I though you meant tennis players.... But let's stick on the Johns and J's for a start:

Johnny Marr 

Jonny Greenwood

John Petrucci

Joe Bonamassa

Jack White

OK more guitar heroes around today:

Derek Trucks

Susan Tedeschi

Graham Coxon

Slash

Guthrie Govan

Tom Morello

Rich Robinson

Nels Cline

Doyle Bramhall II

Kurt Vile

I'll stop there.....

John scoffed, Jeff Beck, John Mc Laughlin, Bill Frisell, Jan Ackerman, Eric Clapton....

Posted on: 07 October 2018 by Bob the Builder
Bob the Builder posted:

The thought of going to see any of the people you mention PEDER fills me with dread and I could no more drag myself out into my back garden to see them than pay hundreds and hundreds of pounds for the pleasure.  Believe it or not the world didn't begin and end with the baby boomers most people under the age of 50 would find the sight of Mick Jagger the old fishgobbler doing his decrepit praying mantis routine to the words 'you make a dead man come' not only boring but quite cringe worthy.

It is a new world we live in where people have instant access to music and to concert videos there is no more mystique nor Kudos at going to see people performing anymore and if there is it is more about the event itself i.e Glastonbury rather than the performer like a DJ playing records by many different artists these festivals offer small bitesize performances before it's off to another stage and another artist.

As one of your stadium fillers once said 'the times they are a changing' and when Jagger is too decrepit to dance and his 60 and 70 something audience to old to hobble along to watch stadium filling artists will be no more and not because there are no new 'Guitar Heroes' to take there place but because there is not a market for them.

The rock and rolling baby boomers were of a time and that time will pass and don't even get me started on Michael Jackson.

Amend would definitely have gone into back garden to see Aretha, Harry belafonte, Stevie Wonder and Ray Charles 

Posted on: 08 October 2018 by Innocent Bystander

Iím a bit bemused by this subject. To me there is no competitive element to music, no Ďtop dogí. So I couldnít begin to suggest a Ďtopí live artist to ďtake overĒ - what exactly are they taking over? There is reference to longevity but I donít think this is just seeking people still around, rather I assume longevity at the top of the game, which to me implies still prodcing new music, as good as ever - and that is exceedingly rare for music writers, as most seem to go through a period of maximum creativity, then wane. Different if youíe talking about performers rather that composers or composer-performers. 

If I reflect back over the hundreds of gigs Iíve been to over the years and consider which ones stand out the most: The Who back in their heyday were fantastic live performers absolutely gripped the audience, (still very good when I saw them about 10 years ago, but not as good as the first time I saw them in 1971). Deep Purple (Mk2) not far behind, but again that was back at the start of the seventies.  Plenty of other enjoyably memorable gigs that I readily recall, but donít leap ahead of others. Some of thise artists are still going, some more actively than others - bu all are writer-performers, and I hesitate to suggest that any have been consistently good through to today.

As far as performers who do not write their own music, my main area of experience is with classical music. Now there my most memorable performance has nothing to do wifh charisma of an artist, just fantastic music, performed with feeling, an emotional ride that made tears pour down my face: Welsh National Opera playing Turandot about 18 years ago. Puccini may be dead, but his work lives on, and performers will play it and make it live again.Reflecting on it, that is just what tribute bands do for non-classical music - and when done well it has the potential to bridge the gap between the real thing and hifi. Maybe another question may be which are the best tribute bands?

Posted on: 08 October 2018 by Innocent Bystander
Bob the Builder posted:

The thought of going to see any of the people you mention PEDER fills me with dread and I could no more drag myself out into my back garden to see them than pay hundreds and hundreds of pounds for the pleasure.  Believe it or not the world didn't begin and end with the baby boomers most people under the age of 50 would find the sight of Mick Jagger the old fishgobbler doing his decrepit praying mantis routine to the words 'you make a dead man come' not only boring but quite cringe worthy.

It is a new world we live in where people have instant access to music and to concert videos there is no more mystique nor Kudos at going to see people performing anymore and if there is it is more about the event itself i.e Glastonbury rather than the performer like a DJ playing records by many different artists these festivals offer small bitesize performances before it's off to another stage and another artist.

As one of your stadium fillers once said 'the times they are a changing' and when Jagger is too decrepit to dance and his 60 and 70 something audience to old to hobble along to watch stadium filling artists will be no more and not because there are no new 'Guitar Heroes' to take there place but because there is not a market for them.

The rock and rolling baby boomers were of a time and that time will pass and don't even get me started on Michael Jackson.

Iím not sure where the idea of kudos for going to live performances comes from? You go because you enjoy the music, and the atmosphere of a live gig and direct connection with the artist, pkaying differently every time, makes it something quite different from listening to hifi at home, no matter how close the hifi might get to a realistic sound. As for concert videos, whilst they can geive you a large part of that, it is still a video, just as a record is still a record not the live event - and only those whose  hifi systems are truly capable of reproducing the scale of the live sound will get close to the live feel.

Regarding live gifs, to me small is best, and I have a strong dislike of stadia-sized gigs. I went to one once, to see the Stones, and, though enjoyable, the distance, the need for binoculars to see anything you wanted to focus on, the noticeable time delay between what I could see and the sound reaching me, and the sheer size of crown to get through combined to reduce the pleasure and appeal. And why, oh why, are tickets more expensive for a large venue than a small one? It should be the other way round. One venue I sorely miss from when I lived near London is the Marquee Club (the original, in Wardour St), a 400-capacity venue where sometimes bands who had well outgrown it would sometimes play incognito.

Stadium gigs aside, Iíve been to a handful of large open-air events, the first (Pink Floyd at Crystal Palace bowl) having been a surreal experience for a 16 year old, however with those I agree that the atmosphere and Ďvibeí comes from the event, not specifically the acts though they are a fundamental part (and PF certainly were for me at the aforementioned one).

 

Posted on: 08 October 2018 by Bob the Builder
Innocent Bystander posted:
Bob the Builder posted:

The thought of going to see any of the people you mention PEDER fills me with dread and I could no more drag myself out into my back garden to see them than pay hundreds and hundreds of pounds for the pleasure.  Believe it or not the world didn't begin and end with the baby boomers most people under the age of 50 would find the sight of Mick Jagger the old fishgobbler doing his decrepit praying mantis routine to the words 'you make a dead man come' not only boring but quite cringe worthy.

It is a new world we live in where people have instant access to music and to concert videos there is no more mystique nor Kudos at going to see people performing anymore and if there is it is more about the event itself i.e Glastonbury rather than the performer like a DJ playing records by many different artists these festivals offer small bitesize performances before it's off to another stage and another artist.

As one of your stadium fillers once said 'the times they are a changing' and when Jagger is too decrepit to dance and his 60 and 70 something audience to old to hobble along to watch stadium filling artists will be no more and not because there are no new 'Guitar Heroes' to take there place but because there is not a market for them.

The rock and rolling baby boomers were of a time and that time will pass and don't even get me started on Michael Jackson.

Iím not sure where the idea of kudos for going to live performances comes from? You go because you enjoy the music, and the atmosphere of a live gig and direct connection with the artist, pkaying differently every time, makes it something quite different from listening to hifi at home, no matter how close the hifi might get to a realistic sound. As for concert videos, whilst they can geive you a large part of that, it is still a video, just as a record is still a record not the live event - and only those whose  hifi systems are truly capable of reproducing the scale of the live sound will get close to the live feel.

Regarding live gifs, to me small is best, and I have a strong dislike of stadia-sized gigs. I went to one once, to see the Stones, and, though enjoyable, the distance, the need for binoculars to see anything you wanted to focus on, the noticeable time delay between what I could see and the sound reaching me, and the sheer size of crown to get through combined to reduce the pleasure and appeal. And why, oh why, are tickets more expensive for a large venue than a small one? It should be the other way round. One venue I sorely miss from when I lived near London is the Marquee Club (the original, in Wardour St), a 400-capacity venue where sometimes bands who had well outgrown it would sometimes play incognito.

Stadium gigs aside, Iíve been to a handful of large open-air events, the first (Pink Floyd at Crystal Palace bowl) having been a surreal experience for a 16 year old, however with those I agree that the atmosphere and Ďvibeí comes from the event, not specifically the acts though they are a fundamental part (and PF certainly were for me at the aforementioned one).

 

Your not sure where the idea of Kudos comes from for attending a live event you  must have led a sheltered existence. 

Attend any live music event and at least half of the audience are busy not watching but filming the event so that they may post on Facebook, Twitter or Snapfish to let the world know that they were Ďthereí. If that isnít trying to gain kudos I donít know what is. 

Also attend any show by any of the artists listed above and some old bore canít wait to tell you that they saw so and so before they were big and again if that isnít trying to gain Kudos I donít know what is.

 

Posted on: 08 October 2018 by Guinnless
Bob the Builder posted:

Attend any live music event and at least half of the audience are busy not watching but filming the event so that they may post on Facebook, Twitter or Snapfish to let the world know that they were Ďthereí. If that isnít trying to gain kudos I donít know what is.

I think this is narcissim rather than Kudos, Bob 

Posted on: 08 October 2018 by Innocent Bystander
Bob the Builder posted: 

Your not sure where the idea of Kudos comes from for attending a live event you  must have led a sheltered existence. 

Attend any live music event and at least half of the audience are busy not watching but filming the event so that they may post on Facebook, Twitter or Snapfish to let the world know that they were Ďthereí. If that isnít trying to gain kudos I donít know what is. 

Also attend any show by any of the artists listed above and some old bore canít wait to tell you that they saw so and so before they were big and again if that isnít trying to gain Kudos I donít know what is.

 

What people are doing filming is nothing to me (though they may be risking being ejected having phones confiscated). I always assumed it was for their own subsequent enjoyment or to share with friends who hadnít been able to go. But if they do brag about going to a gig, not only are they pitiful creatures, but surely that very action rather loses them kudos, not gains it.

Everyone I know that goes to live gigs goes to enjoy the music. I know some people who have recorded to play back for themselves some tome later (oblivious of quality), and others who have recorded a short part on a phone so that others could appreciate it - but whilst they may tell others about and sometimes be the envy of those who couldnít go, that is it, end of story. Your experience reinforces my belief in social media as being a bad thing! 

As for people claiming to have known the band before they were big (again, bragging not gaining kudos), its not something Iíve had the misfortune to have to ignore - but I bet they wished the artist hadnít got big, so they could continue to see them more easily and cheaply!

 

Posted on: 08 October 2018 by TOBYJUG

Remember music is just wiggly air.    As long as it's wiggled with a message.

Posted on: 08 October 2018 by Innocent Bystander
TOBYJUG posted:

Remember music is just wiggly air.    As long as it's wiggled with a message.

I like that, but nothing to distingish music from speech.

How about: Music is wiggly air, wiggled with emotion?