Where did 2018 go?

Posted by: Bob the Builder on 20 December 2018

I know with age the years do seem to fly past quicker and quicker but where in Godís name did 2018 go?

Posted on: 20 December 2018 by Kevin-W

It ain't over yet...

Posted on: 20 December 2018 by TOBYJUG

Marty mcfly has so much to answer for, especially since we are all living in his ****ed up alternative.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/d8/Michael_J._Fox_as_Marty_McFly_in_Back_to_the_Future%2C_1985.jpg/220px-Michael_J._Fox_as_Marty_McFly_in_Back_to_the_Future%2C_1985.jpg

Posted on: 20 December 2018 by Eoink

I find it amazing that we're nearly a fifth of the way through the 21st century, I'm sure it only started 3 or 4 years ago.

Posted on: 20 December 2018 by Ardbeg10y

It was the year of my wife. She managed an euro 15000 holiday and I still have no LP12 despite I turned 40.

Posted on: 20 December 2018 by hungryhalibut

Sometimes time seems to fly by, yet at other times it seems to go very slowly. For me, 2018 seems to have been really long, which I put down to packing lots of things in, and always having things on the calendar to look forward to and later to look back upon. These things donít have to be big: a couple of nights camping for example, or a concert. 

Posted on: 20 December 2018 by Don Atkinson

Seems a long, long time ago that a few of us met up at HQ Salisbury. Since then Brexit seems to have turned nasty, we've found time to have several holidays from a couple of days in Dorset to a couple of months in the Rockies. Business has been brisk and Xmas seems to have emerged like a Star on Stage ie suddenly appeared from nowhere. I put this last contradiction down to the weather.....if it ain't cold and frosty, it can't be Xmas !

Merry Xmas & a happy New Year

Posted on: 20 December 2018 by Bob the Builder

I have been very, very busy this year with work,  too busy by far and perhaps this disapearing year has been in part due to that, next year however I intend to do much less work and so spend more time with my beautiful partner who as ever is light years ahead of me but has the amazing gift of letting me think it was all my idea once I finally catch her up.

Slowing down is in itself like work to some of us but as I approach my 50th year it is a skill I'm determined to master. 

 

Posted on: 20 December 2018 by Bruce Woodhouse

2018 was a unspectacular year for us. We had the ups and downs of caring for distant, ageing parents and that will continue. A great summer for weather but work has consumed more of my waking (and should be asleep) hours despite in theory reducing my commitment slightly. We had some good holidays, with sea-kayaking off NW Scotland the highlight. My wife has had a year of good health after some major blips in the last few years. Fingers remain crossed.

In less than a year I will be retiring. So 2019 will be interesting!

Bruce

Posted on: 21 December 2018 by hungryhalibut

Moving to retirement from a full on job is a big jolt. Iíd heartily recommend a book by Celia Dodd called Not Fade Away. 

Posted on: 21 December 2018 by Suzy Wong

Iíve gone down to three days per week in preparation for retirement this time next year.

Even that feels weird!

Posted on: 21 December 2018 by Bruce Woodhouse

Thanks for that HH.

Bruce

Posted on: 21 December 2018 by Don Atkinson
hungryhalibut posted:

Moving to retirement from a full on job is a big jolt. Iíd heartily recommend a book by Celia Dodd called Not Fade Away. 

When I officially retired at 65, I avoided that big jolt by going self-employed. My thinking was 4 Days a week and plenty of holidays gradually reducing over the next 5 years.

Seven years on and itís still five flexible days a week, but I do genuinely enjoy what I do and we do have extended holidays.

Posted on: 21 December 2018 by jlarsson
Suzy Wong posted:

Iíve gone down to three days per week in preparation for retirement this time next year.

Even that feels weird!

I read a book by Gontjarov and the extremely lazy main figure (this is 19th century aristocracy) Oblomov has a friend that has to start working ... between 1 and 5 every afternoon and Oblomov is worried about his friend Ēwhen will he have time to thinkĒ.

Iíve been at four days for a while and going for three ... three will probably feel more definitive towards retirement. Four days has been perfect. 

 

Posted on: 21 December 2018 by Mike Sullivan

Somehow I went from 1 Naim system to 3. What happened there?

But my year has been too busy. Iím moving back to self employed next year after moving my business into another and that not really working out. I do 4 day weeks though and thatís pretty good.

Highlights have been opening the first 2.5km of a new major cycleway/walkway in town that I have managed. 2.5km to go! Roger Waters and Steven Wilson at each end of the year have been musical highlights.

Settling school options for our daughter who has learning support has been good to get resolved.  My wife is starting paid work again next year, so thatís great for her, and Iíll be working from home (which means music at lunchtimes).

2018 year of the new Nova and Forest Signatures, so really stoked with that. And setting up the long wanted media room that doubles with the office.

So, a good year with more to look forward to next year, whilst staying present.

Posted on: 21 December 2018 by Innocent Bystander

The short answer to the question is down the Brexit pan hole...

Hiwever, I have a theory: time is speeding up - what other explanation can there be? It would also explain how athletes can forever manage to break previous speed records. Actually time is speeding up far faster than the athletic records suggest / that is not inconsistent because obviously as time passes and humans evolve, becoming further from the hunt /be hunted reality of Neolithic times, we actually become ever less fit, so if time passed at a constant rate athletesí times would be getting slower and slower: the speeding up of time compensates.

Posted on: 21 December 2018 by Bruce Woodhouse
jlarsson posted:
Suzy Wong posted:

Iíve gone down to three days per week in preparation for retirement this time next year.

Even that feels weird!

I read a book by Gontjarov and the extremely lazy main figure (this is 19th century aristocracy) Oblomov has a friend that has to start working ... between 1 and 5 every afternoon and Oblomov is worried about his friend Ēwhen will he have time to thinkĒ.

Iíve been at four days for a while and going for three ... three will probably feel more definitive towards retirement. Four days has been perfect. 

 

I work 7 'sessions' now, approx. 3 days one week and 4 the next plus extended hours in an evening a few days per month to 8.30pm and some Sat mornings too. My standard working day is 12-13hrs, 16hrs with an extended surgery!

Cutting down creates more issues in terms of handling admin load and losing continuity actually affects my quality of work as well as the patient experience so I will not reduce further. For me gradual reduction would be less satisfying, (and tough on my colleagues too).

I have plenty of external interests and several plans for my post retirement life-I will still be pretty young!

Bruce