Albums which blew you away on first play.

rjstaines posted:
Pev posted:

Image result for anthem of the sun

Anthem of the Sun - Grateful Dead. Hearing this on stereo headphones with a good strong joint was a defining moment in my appreciation of what music could be. Still sounds wonderful nearly 50 years later.

Maybe I should try that. 

Which?  

Or is that both - the joint needed for you to like the album? 

 

Pev posted:

Hearing this on stereo headphones with a good strong joint was a defining moment 

 

Audio Obstacle Course - Era III.

Especially the moment of clarity and resolution on Track 4 Sibilance Test (Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66) .

Later graduated to Metal Machine Music, Lou Reed.

I think I recall being similarly 'blown away' by the run out groove on many LPs - during the age of acid.

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A mate at school mentioned this band and I took a gamble (LPs very expensive then) and settled down in my bedroom in the evening to play it. This was my first album with the vertigo label which, even with the lighting down, captured my attention as the LP began to rotate. Then I sat back and waited. First came the rain, then the thunder, and the tolling of the bell and then.................wow! I was blown away and have been a Sabbath fan ever since. 

MDS posted:

A mate at school mentioned this band and I took a gamble (LPs very expensive then) and settled down in my bedroom in the evening to play it. This was my first album with the vertigo label which, even with the lighting down, captured my attention as the LP began to rotate. Then I sat back and waited. First came the rain, then the thunder, and the tolling of the bell and then.................wow! I was blown away and have been a Sabbath fan ever since. 

Yes, I actually prefer this album to Paranoid, but it was less of a blow away for me as I was already familiar with the band. The opening really is great, especially with lights low...

So a few people have mentioned it, but I think it deserves a picture.

Generally I find that albums which 'blow me away' on first listen don't stand the test of time. For me it's most often those which take several plays before they start to make sense that have the enduring appeal. Close to the Edge by Yes was one such album. On first play it was just so alien that I was most upset that I'd wasted my pocket money. But I couldn't afford to buy many records, which in money terms weren't any different to today's ticket prices, but in real terms were ridiculously expensive. Hence, I had to live with it and play it. Eventually after a half-dozen or more plays I had that "OMG this is brilliant!" epiphany.

Conversely, and a record which disproves that theory is this one, the Who's Quadrophenia.  The sound of the sea on the beach, the four themes and then Daltrey opening with "Can ya see the real me, can ya? Can ya?" Then the power chords, the crashing drums of Keith Moon and I was instantly hooked. And have been ever since. One of the finest rock albums ever. Ever. 

The first record I recall "moving" me was the Mercury 1812 with cannon, we were visiting family friends and he was demonstrating his new Garrard 401/Quad set up. I have no idea what the speakers were, but he had a diy one in the window seat, possibly a Basset, an early subwoofer, the compression waves in that room really shook you.

Then stand outs were Sgt Pepper, Tubular Bells, John Dummer Blues Band - Cabal, Fairport - What We Did On Our Holidays.

Later, Black Uhuru - Anthem, Joe Cocker - Sheffield Steel, Three Mustaphas Three - Shopping, Ini Kamoze.

More recently Fay Hield - Old Adam, Applewood Road, Lady Maisery - Cycle.

I first heard this when it came out, in early 1977. It was on a crappy old EMI Soundhog blank tape. An older boy at school taped it for me, as I was 14 at the time and LPs were very expensive and unaffordable to us lower middle class types.

Even though I was listening to it on one of those mono Philips portable cassette machines (sometimes with a single earpiece) in my bedroom or on the family's Ferguson Studio 6 music centre in the front room, I used to play it endlessly. I hadn't been listening to music seriousy for that long, and liked Bowie a lot, but I'd never heard anything like this. It was utterly spellbinding.

The 'sound' of it (much later I learned a lot of the album's unique sound was down to producer Tony Visconti's heavy use of the Eventide Harmoniser), the strange and exotic textures, the enigmatic lyrics, the synths, the arty, downbeat music on side two... all heaven to these teenage years.

In those pre-internet days, Bowie - someone whom I (and tens of thousands of others) regarded as a person of exquisite and cutting edge tastes, was a kind of search engine, a Google in human form. If you read in the papers that he liked a certain artist or kind of music; if he was working with someone; or had namechecked someone, you sought out that person or that genre. Thus, Low led me on a journey of discovery to all manner of outré music, from Neu! to Penderecki through to the Stooges and Eno.

In 1980, after having worn out endless tapes of it, I finally bought it on LP and still have many copies of it - including a much-prized Japanese LP. I still play it regularly. For me, it is the apex of The Dame's long and remarkable career. And I still think "Subterraneans" is one of the loveliest pieces of music ever made.

Up - by Peter Gabriel.
I simply couldn't believe I'd missed such a great album - stunning!
Plus, the sound quality not only blew me away but also the friend who'd brought it round on 180g vinyl.
Sublime and still a favourite, even though when buying the 180g vinyl LP, it cost me the same as a nice meal for two...

I keep reading the words "when it came out",  except I keep reading them as "when I came out".

There's probably some deep psycholocical stuff going on in my brain here, but without getting into that, could folks please consider using the words "when it was first released" ?  

Thanks in advance, Roger     

it was for me in 1985, i was 19 years old, and discovered a few albums that impressed me hardly:  Herbie Hancock/ man child,  Miles Davis/ decoy,  Billy Cobham/ spectrum.

It was the beginning of music passion for me and hifi too .   Of course, even today, i am discovering super albums, from time to time.

Kevin-W posted:

I first heard this when it came out, in early 1977. It was on a crappy old EMI Soundhog blank tape. An older boy at school taped it for me, as I was 14 at the time and LPs were very expensive and unaffordable to us lower middle class types.

Even though I was listening to it on one of those mono Philips portable cassette machines (sometimes with a single earpiece) in my bedroom or on the family's Ferguson Studio 6 music centre in the front room, I used to play it endlessly. I hadn't been listening to music seriousy for that long, and liked Bowie a lot, but I'd never heard anything like this. It was utterly spellbinding.

The 'sound' of it (much later I learned a lot of the album's unique sound was down to producer Tony Visconti's heavy use of the Eventide Harmoniser), the strange and exotic textures, the enigmatic lyrics, the synths, the arty, downbeat music on side two... all heaven to these teenage years.

In those pre-internet days, Bowie - someone whom I (and tens of thousands of others) regarded as a person of exquisite and cutting edge tastes, was a kind of search engine, a Google in human form. If you read in the papers that he liked a certain artist or kind of music; if he was working with someone; or had namechecked someone, you sought out that person or that genre. Thus, Low led me on a journey of discovery to all manner of outré music, from Neu! to Penderecki through to the Stooges and Eno.

In 1980, after having worn out endless tapes of it, I finally bought it on LP and still have many copies of it - including a much-prized Japanese LP. I still play it regularly. For me, it is the apex of The Dame's long and remarkable career. And I still think "Subterraneans" is one of the loveliest pieces of music ever made.

Bravo - beautifully put. I'm going to play it now!!

Clive B posted:

So a few people have mentioned it, but I think it deserves a picture.

Generally I find that albums which 'blow me away' on first listen don't stand the test of time. For me it's most often those which take several plays before they start to make sense that have the enduring appeal. Close to the Edge by Yes was one such album. On first play it was just so alien that I was most upset that I'd wasted my pocket money. But I couldn't afford to buy many records, which in money terms weren't any different to today's ticket prices, but in real terms were ridiculously expensive. Hence, I had to live with it and play it. Eventually after a half-dozen or more plays I had that "OMG this is brilliant!" epiphany.

Conversely, and a record which disproves that theory is this one, the Who's Quadrophenia.  The sound of the sea on the beach, the four themes and then Daltrey opening with "Can ya see the real me, can ya? Can ya?" Then the power chords, the crashing drums of Keith Moon and I was instantly hooked. And have been ever since. One of the finest rock albums ever. Ever. 

Of course I agree with the record in question! I think this post also makes a very good point - about the albums that have stood the test of time OR NOT! I don't want to hijack the thread, but it might be interesting if posts were to mention if the record has stood the test of time for them as well as the initial impact. It might be fun to see the ones that did make it and ones that didn't.

Here is one from me: U2 - The Joshua Tree - when I got it in 1987 I thought it was great. It went quickly off and I can't stand U2 any more!

 

blythe posted:

Relayer by Yes.
However, these days it doesn't hit the spot in the same way... Funny that..

I agree about U2 Under A Blood Red Sky - that was one amazing album and the accompanying video also blew me away at the time.

I love Yes, but I agree that Relayer doesn't QUITE stand up as well as some of the others.  I still can play the heck out of Tales, Close to the Edge, Fragile and The Yes Album however!!

A few from memory which really stand out:

The Story of the Who c.1977 - played on my dad's chisel-stylused Ultra record player. I recollect playing this as loud as I dare in our terraced house, always checking to see if neighbour's cars were outside. Strangely, I didn't listen to Who's Next until 2005 and that also blew me away and brought back many memories. 

John Miles - Zaragon c.1983 - this just leapt off the record at me.   

Joe Jackson - Jumpin' Jive c.1985 - great fun and an introduction to a new genre, noting Joe's albums are different in style.

Dave Brubeck - Live at Carnegie Hall  -  I'd not explored jazz much and the likes of Take Five was pretty much elevator music to me but this was ear-opening, with so much power and energy.  

King Curtis - Live at Fillmore West - R&B at its best - such a fun album, again full of power and energy. 

Sarah Jane Morris - August - her vocal style and phrasing caught my ear and I was hooked.

..notable absence of Coldplay on this thread 

Not so much an album that blew me away - although its a damn good album anyway - it was one track. 

Alvin Lee's "Nineteen Ninety-Four"   track 5 " The Bluest Blues"

I've been an Alvin Lee fan from his days with Ten Years After,  he's an outstanding guitarist, pure & simple.   Anyhow,  getting back to the album & track 5 ........   it's a beautiful guitar duet with George Harrison, George plays slide,  the track is rated as "the most perfect blues song ever written"  .........  can't disagree with that - & then some.  Another amazing track is John Lennon's "I Want You" (She's So Heavy),  again with GH.    The rest of the album is all good with some of Alvin's classic standards & for me one album I would never be without.   

I originally bought it as a vinyl,  but it got well worn & when I moved to streaming none of the streaming vendors have it & I could only get hold of an MP3 copy. So I looked around for a CD to rip & found it on Amaz.com (USA).   In USA the original album is published under a different title as "I Hear You Rockin' ".   I just looked around the www again & see it with some totally madness prices,  £150 !!!  you cannot be serious !!!!.   

I bought it as a 2015 remastered release on the Rainman label,  the latest price on The Big River (USA) is $13.95.   

The whole album is a classic & is a must have if for all Alvin Lee fans & any electric blues guitar enthusiasts.   

 

Lambchop - "Nixon"

I bought this as it was on some best of the year lists at the time and I was intrigued by the description of the music. It was quite unlike anything I had heard before and I still love it to this day.  For me it's their best album.

 

well, well, well … 2 albums in 1 night!!!

 

My dear wife is out tonight and I had time to listen to some albums a friend had dropped off at a decent volume … and two of them were wows on first listen 

 

Philip Glass, etudes - had heard of him but never any of his works, these etudes are marvellous, must buy a CD of them for myself (still not convinced about his operas though).

 

Ravel's Bolero - ok we have all heard this when those 2 skaters were doing their thing but this is the first time I had actually listened to it properly; Bernard Haitink and the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1998 (I think) were a revalation. Still don't like a lot of Ravel's works too much but this track was a winner right from the off and had me sitting up and paying close attention.

Probably not correct from the OP title since I had to wade through all the other tracks to get to this one (it is the last track) but worth it when I got there.

 

I note both of these are rather repetitive architectures and wonder if this is a reflection of getting older (& wiser?) since I am also partial to a bit of Bach fugues as well.

 

... anyway, a really enjoyable evening to myself with not 1, but 2 wow moments.

 

Allan

Nirvana's "Nevermind" kind of blew me away. Then someone said have a listen to Pearl Jam's "Ten". That one really blew me away! A number of other albums have made a deep impression on the first play as well, including "Moving Pictures" by Rush, but Pearl Jam's "Ten" really stands out - probably also because it was a great summer with good friends before life got all serious ...

sjt posted:
Clive B posted:

So a few people have mentioned it, but I think it deserves a picture.

Generally I find that albums which 'blow me away' on first listen don't stand the test of time. For me it's most often those which take several plays before they start to make sense that have the enduring appeal. Close to the Edge by Yes was one such album. On first play it was just so alien that I was most upset that I'd wasted my pocket money. But I couldn't afford to buy many records, which in money terms weren't any different to today's ticket prices, but in real terms were ridiculously expensive. Hence, I had to live with it and play it. Eventually after a half-dozen or more plays I had that "OMG this is brilliant!" epiphany.

Conversely, and a record which disproves that theory is this one, the Who's Quadrophenia.  The sound of the sea on the beach, the four themes and then Daltrey opening with "Can ya see the real me, can ya? Can ya?" Then the power chords, the crashing drums of Keith Moon and I was instantly hooked. And have been ever since. One of the finest rock albums ever. Ever. 

Of course I agree with the record in question! I think this post also makes a very good point - about the albums that have stood the test of time OR NOT! I don't want to hijack the thread, but it might be interesting if posts were to mention if the record has stood the test of time for them as well as the initial impact. It might be fun to see the ones that did make it and ones that didn't.

Here is one from me: U2 - The Joshua Tree - when I got it in 1987 I thought it was great. It went quickly off and I can't stand U2 any more!

 

Totally agree about Quadrophenia strangely Tommy doesn't do it for me but Pete Townsend hit a creative high with Quadrophenia and Who's Next that he never reached again there where moments on The Who by Numbers and the title track to Who Are You but there after it was all down hill unfortunately.

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