Albums which blew you away on first play.

Chunky posted:

R.E.M. - Document.  This was the first R.E.M LP I bought, not long after it came out. I hadn't heard anything by them at this point and bought it on the strength of a good review.  I couldn't believe how good this LP was.

me too - had only heard "It's the end of the world as I know it" as a single. 

Bought all their back catalogue shortly after.

Saw them in 88 on the "Green" tour at Manchester Apollo. Still the best gig I have ever been to. An evening of shivers down the spine. Stipe was brilliant - some beautiful solo intros. Underestimated singer I think.

JedT posted:
Chunky posted:

R.E.M. - Document.  This was the first R.E.M LP I bought, not long after it came out. I hadn't heard anything by them at this point and bought it on the strength of a good review.  I couldn't believe how good this LP was.

me too - had only heard "It's the end of the world as I know it" as a single. 

Bought all their back catalogue shortly after.

Saw them in 88 on the "Green" tour at Manchester Apollo. Still the best gig I have ever been to. An evening of shivers down the spine. Stipe was brilliant - some beautiful solo intros. Underestimated singer I think.

Crikey!  I was also at that concert at the Apollo!  As you say, it was brilliant.  Similarly, I bought all their back catalogue after getting Document.  

Great thread - and plenty of ideas to look into.  Both albums below opened doors to a whole magical world of new (to me) genres of music.  The thrill of discovery is still, after 40 odd years of musical obsession, a source of great pleasure.

The Orb - Adventures Beyond The Ultraworld :  I'd heard Little Fluffy Clouds on Peel so bought the album.   Blimey - I was utterly mesmerised for 2 hours.  And then another two. It genuinely felt like being transported into another rather relaxed dimension.

Flexistentialism - Ninja Tunes Compilation:  This was playing in an otherwise empty Our Price at Hatfield Galleria.  After 20 mins of browsing I asked the staff what was playing and bought the CD.  What was this stiff - hip hop / trip hop / breakbeat / jazz?  No idea - but I loved it.  This was the first time I started buying into a record label rather than a specific artist, and it led to so many fantastic new avenues, Amon Tobin, Coldcut, DJ Shadow, plus some fantastic nights at The Blue Note and the 333 Club.  A big thank you to the staff at Our Price Hatfield!

 

Mike-B posted:

Not so much an album that blew me away - although its a damn good album anyway - it was one track. 

Alvin Lee's "Nineteen Ninety-Four"   track 5 " The Bluest Blues"

I've been an Alvin Lee fan from his days with Ten Years After,  he's an outstanding guitarist, pure & simple.   Anyhow,  getting back to the album & track 5 ........   it's a beautiful guitar duet with George Harrison, George plays slide,  the track is rated as "the most perfect blues song ever written"  .........  can't disagree with that - & then some.  Another amazing track is John Lennon's "I Want You" (She's So Heavy),  again with GH.    The rest of the album is all good with some of Alvin's classic standards & for me one album I would never be without.   

I originally bought it as a vinyl,  but it got well worn & when I moved to streaming none of the streaming vendors have it & I could only get hold of an MP3 copy. So I looked around for a CD to rip & found it on Amaz.com (USA).   In USA the original album is published under a different title as "I Hear You Rockin' ".   I just looked around the www again & see it with some totally madness prices,  £150 !!!  you cannot be serious !!!!.   

I bought it as a 2015 remastered release on the Rainman label,  the latest price on The Big River (USA) is $13.95.   

The whole album is a classic & is a must have if for all Alvin Lee fans & any electric blues guitar enthusiasts.   

 

This is good stuff, thanks for the suggestion.  On Tidal it's titled - Keep on Rockin'.

There are a lot of albums which have blown me away on first listen, but this one is the one that started it all for me.

"With The Beatles" is the first album I can remember listening to the whole way though, at age 5 and 1/2.

I seem to remember it was one of my Aunts' first purchases from her first job on the day it was released. She played it for me - I was stunned and asked for it to be played again and again on my Grandparents ancient radiogramme whenever we visited, reading the sleeve notes avidly and trying to sing along. 

I must have had some interest in pop music before then, and I must have listened to other relatives records, but I don't recall them - this ignited my love of pop music. The tunes, the vocal harmonies, the energy in the performance - it is brilliant and I still play it every so often, though sadly not from the original vinyl LP.

I believe they went on to have a decent career...…...

 

I first heard this on the day of release played by my teacher. At the time I was 13 years old, the teacher I remember came into the class room with a record player and this album under his arm. He gave the whole class the same book to read and said he wanted everybody to read the book and be quiet for about 45 minutes. I never read the book I was just blown away by the music.

With the Beatles was released the same day President Kennedy was assassinated. I had bought three copies that lunchtime, one for me and two on behalf of friends. I also bought a Duane Eddy lp the same day. The news of JFK came in TV sometime after 7 oclock just as I was about to go for a. Friday night out, which I did, but everyone was in shick.

With the Beatles cover is so iconic, and every time I see it it reminds me of the shock of those events and the feeling that one of the inspirations of many of our generation had been cruelly taken from us.

It was possibly the most memorable event of my life - on two counts!

Innocent Bystander posted:

Script for a Jester’s Tear has already been mentioned (as have gigs by them - and I saw many between ‘82 and Fish’s departure, so some of us likely at same gigs!). It did make an impression when I first played it, but maybe not quite blowing me away at first listen as much as these (though it rapidly grew on me and is still a firm favourite):

Led Zeppelin II - opening with Whole Lotta Love my intro to the band, and to heavy rock, 1969 IIRC. Brilliant.

Deep Purple in Rock. I was familiar with and liked the band through their first incarnation, bought this and was completely blown away: From the intro/Hard Lovin’ Man to the stunning Child in Time, this was a stunning album.

Paranoid - Black Sabbath. Another 1970 album, with heavy rock taking the world by storm that year! I already knew and loved the title track, but this widened the experience, from Fairies Wear Boots to War Pigs - wonderful!

Dark Side of the Moon. (Pink Floyd) - a bit of a change from the previous Floyd albums, more mesmerising... no, their earlier albums did mesmerising, maybe this was just more upfront, while akso being more cohesive as an album, from Breathe right through to the closing Brain Damage and Eclipse

In the Court of the Crimson King - King Crimson - another wow album, launching with 21st Century Schizoid Man, Then through the contrasting quieter tracks like and to the powerful Court song itself.

Tommy - The Who. Into a musical journey that engulfed for an hour and a half 

The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway - Genesis. I liked their earlier albums, but this was something different. More engrossing, and very good sound quality to boot.

 

Ooooh, I could go on! And all of these still get played today,...

 

 

 

 

Replace Tommy with Aqualung and your list is my list - add Hot Rats as well for good measure!

Raider posted:

I first heard this on the day of release played by my teacher. At the time I was 13 years old, the teacher I remember came into the class room with a record player and this album under his arm. He gave the whole class the same book to read and said he wanted everybody to read the book and be quiet for about 45 minutes. I never read the book I was just blown away by the music.

What a great teacher you had, Raider.

Raider posted:

I first heard this on the day of release played by my teacher. At the time I was 13 years old, the teacher I remember came into the class room with a record player and this album under his arm. He gave the whole class the same book to read and said he wanted everybody to read the book and be quiet for about 45 minutes. I never read the book I was just blown away by the music.

Nice one Raider.

You reminded me of a physiology lecture in my second year of university where the lecturer introduced his subject of the heart, with the first thirty seconds of Breathe on a Dansette, at 9am on a Tuesday morning. Naturally we all thought this the height of cool.

Talking of the heart, he allegedly ran off with my advisor of studies' wife. But I digress.

dave marshall posted:

  The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Are You Experienced.

  I've just mentioned this album over on the "University" topic, and I can still remember bringing it home from the record shop and  

  being absolutely gobsmacked, hearing it for the first time.

  I'd never heard anything remotely like it before, and to say that the first listening was jaw dropping would be an understatement

  indeed.

  So, what album had a similar effect on you, the memory of which has stayed with you till this day?

THIS!! ^^

 The Cult - Love.

 I previously posted Jimi's first album, which seems to have had a similar "wow" effect on not a few forum members.

 Well, maybe not quite to the same extent as that milestone, but this from The Cult was, for me, quite a "wow' moment too, as it

 seemed to cut through much of the turgid music otherwise around at the time, and Astbury's voice and Billy Duffy's spectral guitar are

 just made for each other ................... a classic album from the '80's

 Saw them in Leeds 2/3 years ago, and the magic is still there.

 In 1975 Elton John and Fleetwood Mac were big stars, but my favourite album was this one by Steeleye Span. I was probably the only one in my school who had bought it. Little Sir Hugh and other olde folk songs just rocked. Great album from beginning to end and a refreshing change from mid 70s orthodoxy.

Happy Mondays - Pills’nThrills’n’Bellyaches

Not a duff note on this. Rhythm section tighter than a gnat’s rear end. Shaun Ryder a demented shaman, twisting the melons of the second summer of love. Played it. Practically fainted. Played it again and again. Just about perfect.

The Sundays - Reading, Writing and Arithmetic 

When this, their first album, came out, The Sundays felt very special. There was a fragility to Harriet’s voice which sent shivers through me. I saw them live at the time and the whole venue was completely silent in awestruck wonder. Oh, and John Peel played ‘Here’s Where The Story Ends’ as a farewell to John Walters on their last show together. That’s how damn good this music is.

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