Another 2960, Fibre, Cables etc. Thread.

A nice 'new' 2960 has just arrived. By new I mean unused and sealed in the original box, with all accessories intact, but with a manufacture date of 2011. I fitted the SFP fibre module, replaced the fibre patch with an LC-LC version, configured and it's working beautifully. I have had limited time to listen, but initial impressions are favourable. Slightly more 'air' with a more natural decay to notes. At present I'm still using an Audioquest Cinnamon cable for the last metre.

Original Post

Yeah those catalysts are good aren't they... i actually rather like my uplink connection from my 3560 that use two aggregated ethernet links (the cables are of no consequence as they are logically combined into aggregated group) ...  gives me more headroom to the connections on a socket by socket basis - and sounds pretty good on my streamer.

Simon

i am really not sure what you mean by that paragraph. How are the cables not important ? What are your streaming that requires over 1GB connection ? And the comment about head room on a socket by socket basis ? 

I guess without any contex none of it makes much sense ? 

Would love to understand. 

 

Rob

 

Hi Simon,

I was literally just reading how to setup the 3560 so I could manage it from the network when I saw this post.

I'm pretty confident I'll be able to get it working but are you able to elaborate on what the IGMP settings should be, or is the idea to disable it altogether?

Cheers,

Loks

Mort2k posted:

Simon

i am really not sure what you mean by that paragraph. How are the cables not important ? What are your streaming that requires over 1GB connection ? And the comment about head room on a socket by socket basis ? 

I guess without any contex none of it makes much sense ? 

Would love to understand. 

 

Rob

 

 

Perhaps he is trying to direct you to the idea that yeah spend 50 quid on a 15 year old switch, but don't be done over on ethernet cables.

 

 

Mort2k posted:

Simon

i am really not sure what you mean by that paragraph. How are the cables not important ? What are your streaming that requires over 1GB connection ? And the comment about head room on a socket by socket basis ? 

I guess without any contex none of it makes much sense ? 

Would love to understand. 

 

Rob

Hi, on these particular devices, one can effectively join the connections together or aggregate them, so you you have higher throughput and potentially more resilient connections... this gives the extra ‘headroom’ in terms of throughput into the switch. The cables are still used of course, and by post was perhaps slightly misleading in that regard, but when you aggregate the cables then a particular transfer is directed over one of the aggregated cables in vararious pseudo random ways (ieultimately deterministic) based on combinations of network address, socket, port etc. 

One other way of looking at it, is that I have determined that inter frame timing, at least on the legacy streamers, has a bearing on overall subjective sound quality. By using aggregated links one has better chance of preserving interframe timing whilst there is other traffic travelling to the switch... it’s not perfect but better...

if that still doesn’t make sense.. ignore it, it’s simply the inner geek in me.

Simon, I ‘m guessing that if you were to just connect two cables between a pair of switches instread of one, some configuration of the switches would then be required for them to work as aggregated. Shame that Naim streamers don’t have two RJ45 ports for this 😂

loks posted:

Hi Simon,

I was literally just reading how to setup the 3560 so I could manage it from the network when I saw this post.

I'm pretty confident I'll be able to get it working but are you able to elaborate on what the IGMP settings should be, or is the idea to disable it altogether?

Cheers,

Loks

yes - obviously go into enable mode on one of your switch/router devices... edit the running-config and addto turn the querier on

ip igmp snooping querier

You can adjust the timeouts and update timers but I leave as default..

To see the multicast groups you can  enter 

Rupert#show ip igmp snooping groups 

Vlan      Group                    Type        Version     Port List

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

5         233.89.188.1                igmp        v2          Fa0/7

5         233.233.233.233          igmp        v2          Fa0/7

5         239.254.127.63            igmp        v2          Fa0/7, Gi0/1

5         239.255.255.250          igmp        v2          Fa0/1, Fa0/7, 

                                                                                  Gi0/1

and in this list you can see the multicast group 239.255.255.250, which is the discovery group used by UPnP.

If you ping 239.255.255.250 from one of your devices on your network running UPnP discovery you should see all the ip addresses responding of devices now reliably joined into the discovery group. Such as

 

iMac:~ Simon$ ping 239.255.255.250

PING 239.255.255.250 (239.255.255.250): 56 data bytes

64 bytes from 192.168.1.15: icmp_seq=0 ttl=128 time=0.404 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.1.9: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.555 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.1.41: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=54.237 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.1.15: icmp_seq=1 ttl=128 time=0.611 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.1.41: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=72.342 ms

^C

In this example 192.168.1.15 and 192.168.1.41 is the iPad running my Naim app

 

Simon

ChrisSU posted:

Simon, I ‘m guessing that if you were to just connect two cables between a pair of switches instread of one, some configuration of the switches would then be required for them to work as aggregated. 

Oh yes... viewers don’t do this at home unless you know what you doing  .... otherwise if you simply connect two Ethernet cables in parallel between two consumer switches you will cause a broadcast storm and bring your home network to a grinding halt across your entire subnet. The Cisco Catalyst devices  have a protection enabled by default to prevent this. (Obviously in a commercial environment this could be devastating) .. and this is why it take the Cisco Catalyst devices longer to bring up a port when a device is connected or powered on.

Simon-in-Suffolk posted:
loks posted:

Hi Simon,

I was literally just reading how to setup the 3560 so I could manage it from the network when I saw this post.

I'm pretty confident I'll be able to get it working but are you able to elaborate on what the IGMP settings should be, or is the idea to disable it altogether?

Cheers,

Loks

yes - obviously go into enable mode on one of your switch/router devices... edit the running-config and addto turn the querier on

ip igmp snooping querier

You can adjust the timeouts and update timers but I leave as default..

To see the multicast groups you can  enter 

Rupert#show ip igmp snooping groups 

Vlan      Group                    Type        Version     Port List

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

5         233.89.188.1                igmp        v2          Fa0/7

5         233.233.233.233          igmp        v2          Fa0/7

5         239.254.127.63            igmp        v2          Fa0/7, Gi0/1

5         239.255.255.250          igmp        v2          Fa0/1, Fa0/7, 

                                                                                  Gi0/1

and in this list you can see the multicast group 239.255.255.250, which is the discovery group used by UPnP.

If you ping 239.255.255.250 from one of your devices on your network running UPnP discovery you should see all the ip addresses responding of devices now reliably joined into the discovery group. Such as

 

iMac:~ Simon$ ping 239.255.255.250

PING 239.255.255.250 (239.255.255.250): 56 data bytes

64 bytes from 192.168.1.15: icmp_seq=0 ttl=128 time=0.404 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.1.9: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.555 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.1.41: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=54.237 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.1.15: icmp_seq=1 ttl=128 time=0.611 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.1.41: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=72.342 ms

^C

In this example 192.168.1.15 and 192.168.1.41 is the iPad running my Naim app

 

Simon

Thanks for your very helpful instructions Simon. I managed to get the querier enabled, still early days but everything is looking good so far :-)

Cheers,

Loks

Quick update...

i have now been running the 2960 with fibre uplink to my SG300 for a week now. I forgot to mention that I also enabled IGMP snooping on the main switch at the same time, but this has definitely improved SSDP discovery; find rooms has been quick and error free this week.

It’s really hard to judge sound quality as I was perfectly happy before, but I have noticed that my listening sessions this week have been particularly enjoyable and I have not wanted to switch off at the end of the evening. I can’t put this into words, other than to say the emotional connection has been stronger.

The stats on the uplink are faultless; a little over 3m packets sent and received, with zero send or receive errors.

And as a bonus, I have 2 fewer boxes on the lowest shelf of my Fraim, so a ‘neater’ solution overall.

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×