Coast to Coast

Dear Forum

Well, I've been persuaded at work to do the C 2 C bike ride in a group of 12 or 13 people later in the summer. Unfortunately I'm horribly unfit at the moment, and my preparation so far consists of buying some Continental Town & Country tyres for my mountain bike!

I'm going for a bike ride to see just how bad things are this morning, but I'm hoping that as we're doing the ride over 3 days, it won't be total purgatory! I've also got around 3 or 4 months to lose a bit of weight and improve my stamina, etc.

I have proper cycle shorts, gloves and a helmet, but was wondering if anyone had any advice about either kit that I might need or general advice on getting fit for the type of thing?

Thanks and wish me luck!

Nigel

Original Post

Eat less, do more. It's the only diet that's guaranteed to work. 

Get out on your bike every day. Cycle to work. If it's too dark in the evenings, go to the gym and get on a Wattbike. Download the Wattbike app, do the three minute power test and repeat monthly to see how much you've improved. 

Most important of all: WEAR A HELMET!

Good advice from Simon, snot control when out riding in a group is important...don't hit yourself or your fellow cyclists...

Build up your stamina by riding regularly, with increasing distance and challenging terrain...so you can comfortably cover the estimated daily distance without much discomfort.

Try to ride several times a week, but have a rest day and an easy ride day...

its all about doing the miles...it will get easier, making sure yr bike is set-up so comfortable (no aching bits&bobs) getting some decent kit, and don't forget you need energy intake on the ride...fluid and food..

 

good luck

just off out myself now....

Front & back flashing lights, high quality (8mm min padding) shorts, windbreaker clothing, gel padded gloves, eat correctly if training frequently (not eat less), make sure saddle is comfortable, try and do some running as it will probably  improve overall fitness quicker, glasses, etc, etc......

Do the miles. No pain no gain.

Make sure you ride in all weathers, just in case it is not wall to wall sunshine when you do t. It has been known....

Try to ride 3x week min every week. Two longer and one shorter but faster. Try to do two long rides on consecutive days a few times. Nothing beats riding on hills too, definitely practice even if you have to go some distance to find them or go up and down the same one all day! The route is not seriously hilly, but how that looks to you will depend on where you live and ride now. Ensure you have a cassette at the rear that will get you up hills if you are only used to the flat.

Make sure you are properly comfy on the bike and that your shoes are comfy. Painful feet or backside on a bike make it unpleasant.

I assume you are doing the traditional C2C? There are several now including one that passes near our house (The Way of The Roses).

Final tip; just enjoy it, and when you are done keep riding and enjoying it.

Bruce

PS I don't agree with the suggestion of going running If you are not used to it. Far more likely to get an injury than just training on the bike.

Thanks for all of the suggestions. I think that I'll give the running a miss as my knees aren't great at the moment. I was knocked off my motorbike 6 months ago, and they're still not back to normal yet. I think that just getting out on the bike regularly and doing some miles is the way I'll go, as well as some trips to the gym and swimming.

I put a Brooks Bros saddle on the bike a while ago which is super comfy, but we'll see if I still think that in a few months time.

Ooh, and I'll see if I can perfect my snot control. I'm expecting to be at the back, so hitting others (eeew) shouldn't be a problem.

Nigel


Nigel you don't say how old you are but if you're in the age group of many on this forum you're over 50 or close enough. Given the shape you say you're in you need to see your doctor first. He/She can assure you that you have no underlying conditions to be concerned about. They can also advise you on how quickly to build your exercise program and give you dietary advice. I'm not a big fan of mountain bikes for over the road use but that's your call. Bruce's summary advice is helpful. As I recall, he's quite a rider. Drink lots of water and get plenty of sleep. You'll know you're ready when you're ready to rip into the ride rather than suffer purgatory. If you're not 100% ready, wait until next year. Once in shape, Don't Get Out Of Shape.

I get snot all over my shoulders, can't help it. 

The only thing concerning me is your bike. I don't know anything about the route but do you need a mountain bike? If not I strongly urge you to get a road bike. I have a rough winter road bike that weighs 12kg and a carbon bike that weighs 7kg, I got on the carbon one for the first time this year and it was so much faster.

i do one or two regular 15 mile rides in the week, normally to bank some cheques from my business and then do a large ride on the weekends. Today I've done 47 miles which is by far the longest this year so far and my legs are really tired. Last summer I was do doing at least 100 miles a week and quite a few 100+ mile rides. It's hilly down here in Devon too, I love cycling on Dartmoor.

make sure you eat and drink lots as you go aswell, you burn a lot of energy.

 

Clay Bingham posted:

.. Bruce's summary advice is helpful. As I recall, he's quite a rider...

Thanks. You have made my decade...as I head off out into the drizzle for a Sunday constitional.

A for buying or borrowing a road bike, I guess it depends if everyone else in your group are racing snakes on fast bikes. If it is going to be a mixed bag stick to what you are comfy on, use the hybrid tyres at good pressure and just chug away. Might be that MTB or Hybrid bike gearing suits you on the hills too.

I am not sure anyone with decent common sense needs to see a doctor to train for something like this unless they have significant pre-existing conditions. Start slowly, progress steadily, listen to your body. No shortage of basic advice online. 

Bruce

All good advice above. I'd suggest starting without any distance targets in mind. Start with 2 30min rides a week for 2 weeks, then add a third and begin to gradually up the time by 5 minutes a ride, until you get to an hour or so with ease. after 8-10 weeks you should be feeling a lot quicker. 

I second the buy or borrow a road bike calls, you'll reduce the effort you need to expend to go the same difference by a huge amount. If you find yourself / your group riding over 15mph average speed, then tight fitting clothing will also make a huge difference in the amount of aero drag you have to counter. Weight is everything... lighter body and lighter bike will make it a whole lot easier too. 

Most importantly have fun and remember skin is waterproof!

Oh yeah there's loads of funny folk and traditions around cycling and here's a good start http://www.velominati.com/the-rules/ 

Holmes posted:

All good advice above. I'd suggest starting without any distance targets in mind. Start with 2 30min rides a week for 2 weeks, then add a third and begin to gradually up the time by 5 minutes a ride, until you get to an hour or so with ease. after 8-10 weeks you should be feeling a lot quicker. 

I second the buy or borrow a road bike calls, you'll reduce the effort you need to expend to go the same difference by a huge amount. If you find yourself / your group riding over 15mph average speed, then tight fitting clothing will also make a huge difference in the amount of aero drag you have to counter. Weight is everything... lighter body and lighter bike will make it a whole lot easier too. 

Most importantly have fun and remember skin is waterproof!

Oh yeah there's loads of funny folk and traditions around cycling and here's a good start http://www.velominati.com/the-rules/ 

Very funny rules for cycling. I've not seen these before, but think I might have fallen foul of one or two over the years.

I would repeat my suggestion above of riding to work. This is free exercise, saves the cost of fuel and it really energises you for the day.

Some have suggested buying a road bike, which if you get serious about it and find you really enjoy it, is a good idea. They are so much faster and, although the gearing won't be as low as on a mountain bike, you'd be able to power up those hills faster (and there are one or two in the C2C, especially in Cumbria). I'm a roadie at heart, but we've been training through the winter on mountain bikes in preparation far a ride across Bhutan. Yesterday we went out on our "winter" road bikes In the slightly better weather and really noticed the difference.

Today it's back on the mountain bikes. 

I walked the Coast to Coast some years ago, 192 miles from St Bees across the Lake District and The North York Moors to Robin Hoods Bay. It was pure joy. I wasn't very fit, and had previously been quite ill, but I built up by doing short walks whenever I could - even half an hour in your lunch hour is better than nothing, and if it means you have a light lunch instead of pigging out then even better. As for doing your trip, eat carbohydrates, drink water, eat carbohydrates,  drink water, drink water, eat carbohydrates. Sleep. Repeat.

all good advice ......but I would suggest that saddles should be level! As I was told many years ago, you are supposed to sit on them not lean on them or slip off them. I wouldn't think about tilting them until you are absolutely sure about its comfort position. Then it is up to you but if you have to tilt your saddle I would suspect you have got the wrong saddle. To be honest, I have found saddles a nightmare to find one that is comfortable. For years I rode one and when I had to change it because it was finally too hard, it was a treckle and a half. And don't be afraid to use a decent chamois cream. use it now as your bum gets used to being in that saddle for longer periods. And then use it on the ride. Regularly. There are lots and some will work better for you. I use the Assos one  but my mates prefer others.

And, most importantly as others have said, enjoy it. 

I thought this might happen re: the Brooks!

Please google brooks saddle tilt up. Look at the images as well as the other stuff that comes up. The advice is there if you want it, and you may not because you say yours is comfy.

Years of riding with my Brooks Team Pro level have had me sliding forward and putting too much pressure on my hands and wrists. So I lifted the nose a notch. Bliss. Your mileage (for once, literally) may vary.

But enjoy it whatever you do.

C.

No offence taken as I am a big lad and I already have a pair of their shorts!!

Stopped at the gym on the way home and did just over 10 miles on a stationary bike in 40 mins. Not great but a steady pace, and hopefully not too bad a base to build on over the next few months.

I intend to cut down on the booze and food so I'm hoping that this ride will incentivise me to lose weight, get fitter and make a few life changes as I've had a few difficult things to deal with over the last 6 months - no illnesses, or anything too serious, but enough to make me want to change a few things. 

Looking forward to the ride. The training, not so much, but I know the more I train, the easier the ride will be. 

Hmm, maybe I should decide on a 'reward' if I finish in decent shape/time? Maybe a hi-line, new MacBook or something like that.

Nigel

In addition to the kit you're already mentioned:

A good pair of cycle shoes would be very helpful, but buy a pair that fits perfect from your local friendly cycle shop where they can help you set them up proper on your own bike. This may include  the need to buy pedals with the shoes.  They will probably check and set up other aspects of your bike set up while their at it.  Riding a bike is so much easier and more fun when your feet are clipped to the pedals, most people get used to this and get to like it really quick.

Learn to ride efficiently with a natural cadence of your own ability - this will probably be around 70 - 80 pedal rpm. Learn not to grind along in a gear that's too high.

If you do end up buying a road bike [ Gran Fondo type bike would suit rather well ] then consider changing the outer chainring to a 48, 49, or 50 tooth, especially if the bike comes equipped with a 53 tooth chainring, you'll be able to stay on a smaller outer chainring for longer and be able to 'spin' it easier.

Wear eye protection, in overcast weather wear clear lenses - it can get very dusty out on the road, and there are flying insects...

Always, always, always carry the means to fix a puncture, and a high vis fold away rain jacket.

Good luck with your rides, have fun!

Debs

Thanks for that Debs. I've tried clipped pedals before, and whilst I did get used to them (and used then for a year or so - albeit probably 10 years ago!) I always returned to and preferred flats.

I've been for a few rides so far and have quite enjoyed it - other than my first ride when I forgot to take a drink or any food! Doh - that won't happen again.

The last couple of rides have both been around 20+ miles, in just under 2 hours, so not too bad, although the route only has gentle climbs, so I need to keep getting out and build up to some proper climbs, even though I'm not looking forward to that. 

In between rides, I'm trying to go swimming as well to just get a bit fitter all round. Am also trying to cut down on the booze and food too, so hoping to lose some weight soon.

My main issue at the moment is that as I ride alone, I'm getting bored after a while, although I'm trying to teach myself how to do a manual at the moment. Old dogs, new tricks springs to mind a bit though!

Anyway, determined to keep it up, so thanks for the encouragement so far.

Nigel

Toe cages will do about half of what cleats will do for you, with much less feeling of insecurity. My wife could never get comfortable with cleats, and I inherited her pedals soon after she got her road bike. 

As your body acclimates to more exercise, you may lose some weight. Starvation plus sustained effort does not work. Diet books are written by skinny doctors with business plans.

It takes a long time to habituate to riding at a cadence. Our ancestors were not chosen based on their ability to spin.

I really like Nymph's advice about smaller chainrings. Unless you are going balls-out down hills, a 52 or 53-tooth chainring is a waste of potential. And those clear lenses--essential. I'm sure I would have lost an eye and crashed horribly by now if I didn't cycle with glasses. 

As a rider averaging over 140km a week, the C2C would be a challenge for me.

My 2 pence worth...

1. Dont scrimp on some good cycling shorts and chamois cream.

2. Doing it on a MTB will be epic in terms of effort required; think really seriously about acquiring a road bike!

3. Cleats and clip pedals a must - get used to them.

4. Take the opportunity to ride everywhere. 43 miles both ways to work might not be practicable but driving in, cycling back, cycling in, driving back etc etc should be doable.

5. Use a fitness tracker - STRAVA is a great motivator but beware; you may become addicted!

6. Give up the booze for a few months.

Enjoy getting fit, embrace hills and good luck!!

 

Yes Strava is a very interesting and once you're into it, setting goals, etc, is a great motivator.

Using cleats/clip pedals allows you to pull and push at the same time. Once you're in the rhythm, cycling is a lot more efficient. This is just one advantage using them. There are many. Toe cages do very little except reposition the foot roughly in the same area.

Spending a lot on decent shorts is a good long term investment. Haven't needed any chamois cream yet.

I have to agree re clip pedals. My wife was initially terrified of them but utterly convinced within a couple of miles. They are so simple and using them becomes automatic very quickly. You don't need Β£300 shoes like Count.d either! Cheap SPD pedals and MTB shoes are not going to cost you a fortune and you'll still be able to walk in them too.

As for doing coast-to-coast on an MTB I think that is absolutely fine if that is what your group is riding too. On slick tyres you will be quick enough, you'll also be comfy and have a nice low gear to get up the hills. I ride my MTB like this lots of miles when I'm on hols with my wife. She's not as quick as me so with her on her roadbike and me hampered by the MTB it works out nicely.

Bruce

count.d posted:

Using cleats/clip pedals allows you to pull and push at the same time. Once you're in the rhythm, cycling is a lot more efficient. This is just one advantage using them. There are many. Toe cages do very little except reposition the foot roughly in the same area.

I wouldn't agree that toe clips can't work well if you have them set up right. I stuck with them for many years after clips became the norm, and I would say that you can still 'spin' properly with them. Yes, clips are a more effective coupling to improve efficiency, and that's what I would go for now, but I don't think they are essential.

You'll be absolutely fine, c2c over three days isn't as difficult as you may think. Just take it easy, and if need be walk up the hills. MTB is perfect. You will need to train, I normally do 15 miles every 2-3 days.

I normally stay at Albany House b&b in Penrith first night. It's inexpensive, friendly, immaculate with very comfy beds. The food is incredible, owner used to be mohamed al fayed's personal chef. Book early! Breakfast and dinner puts 5 star hotels and michelin star restaurants to shame.

Look, this is the Naim forum. Heat mouldable carbon shoes are a must, preferably made from kangaroo leather. A heat mouldable carbon insole finishes the ocd desire and allows you to rest at night with a knowing smile.

Also, training distances mean nothing. Do a few 1 mile hills at 11+% and you'll know it.

naim_nymph posted:

...consider changing the outer chainring to a 48, 49, or 50 tooth, especially if the bike comes equipped with a 53 tooth chainring, you'll be able to stay on a smaller outer chainring for longer and be able to 'spin' it easier.

 

Debs

I'd agree that compact crank-set with smaller rings (outer and inner) makes sense for your purposes, but.....

The advantage of a compact crank-set is not that you can stay on the outer (smaller) chain-ring longer, it is  that the spread of gears is greater, and mainly that your low gear can be lower. There is absolutely no point in swapping a 53 for a 50-tooth outer chain-ring if you still have the 39 tooth inner. You need to switch the whole thing to a compact 50/34. (You can't just put a 34 tooth on a regular crank-set as the bolt-circle diameter is too large.)

A compact's 34 x 32 low gear is pretty handy. You can spread that with a 50 X 11 top gear which is actually higher than the more traditional 53 x 12. Only legends really have use for a 53 x 11 top gear. I actually run a 50 x 12 top gear on one bike. It's occasionally too low on a descent, but no big deal. - I just coast - going plenty fast already! The 34 tooth inner ring is however very much appreciated on steeper climbs.

Deb, why do you think spending more time in the outer chain-ring is actually an advantage? I just don't get it. I ride in the gear that suits the speed I'm going so I have my preferred cadence. Whether that's using the inner or outer chain-ring depends on that speed (uphill, downhill, headwind, tailwind etc) . Otherwise it is of no real concern to me. I don't a have "preference" for one or the other.

Great advice so far on the cycling front but there is much you can do off the bike to make the 3 days in the saddle much more bearable and enjoyable and make yourself generally fitter.

Swimming as you are is a great idea - there is something about expelling a breath of air underwater which helps increase lung capacity for which you will be forever grateful in the hills. 

Build up your core. This is key and again very important for multi day, long, hilly rides and the best way to avoid back ache. Easiest way is by doing stationary planks or body pike. I am sure there is much instruction on line. Hold as long as you can, stay straight and suck in your belly. Even if just once a day, by the end of a few weeks you will be amazed at how much longer you can stay down. 

Squatts, lunges, side lunges, etc. all great for building and stretching your power base - quads, glutes and hamstrings. 

Stretch for a few minutes before and after a ride especially on the days of the 3 day event. 

While just piling on the miles is essential, if not inspiring, if you occasionally don't have time for long rides or are not in the mood to spend the time, try some shorter ones but really go for it on an interval type basis or by doing hill repeats as suggested or concentrating on technique. A great one for pedaling speed and smoothness (clips required) is to pedal with only one leg in a relatively easy gear at 70 - 80 rpm but consciously trying to make a perfect circle with no breaks in the motion of the operating leg (not as easy as it sounds especially as you ramp up the rpms, eventually). Initially start with 40 - 50 revs. Before changing legs get both back in the pedals and ramp up the rpms before switching over. Over time you will develop a smooth, efficient cadence and good leg speed. 

All this reminds me I haven't been on a bike in months (had a minor op) and need to get in shape for a 3 dayer in Portugal/Spain in September. Time to get back in the saddle.

Good luck with the ride, and enjoy.

 

Lots of interesting notes in this thread, so I'll throw in my 3 ha'p'orth of comments in the form of my own experience in case it helps.

The basis of my comments are from being a non-athletic person, a person who dislikes physical exercise for the sake of it, who never runs, and who hasn't been in a gym since leaving school.

Jumping back to when I was aged about 30, when my only normal physical exercise was commuting about 2.5 miles each way to/from work in the middle of Newcastle upon Tyne (overall downhill to work, uphill going home), plus walking maybe a mile or so most lunchtimes: One sunny spring day I decided to go out for a cycle ride for the day. No planning, just picked up a map and puncture repair kit and a jumper and set off at maybe 9-10 am. No breakfast first, as I did not normally do breakfast. No lycra, no cycling shorts, just jeans and T-shirt. In those days I didn't even have a helmet. I cycled out to the coast and then northwards, stopped at a pub at lunchtime and had a couple of pints of nice ale and a toasted cheese and onion sandwich then carried on, once or twice stopping to admire the surroundings. Got to Alnwick, watched a bit of a medieval fayre for an hour or so then decided it was time to head home. As I was approaching Morpeth, after about 55 miles, I was really struggling, the last few miles having been hard work, and I was seriously doubting I could make the remaining 15-20 miles home, and so decided to head into Morpeth itself to get the train back. As I pulled off the A1 there was a petrol station, and I realised I was hungry and thirsty. I stopped and had a Coke and two Mars bars. Then got on my bike and cycled home. Being unaccustomed I had simply not considered the energy needed to cycle that distance, and had run out -a top up of sugar and I was on my way, and that is the moral of this particular story. No adverse effects the next day, despite having cycled about 75 miles with no prior training (and no padded shorts), though overall that area is not excessively hilly.

About three months later a friend of mine was doing a John O'Groats to Lands End charity ride, and I joined her for a day in the Lake District, meeting up at Brampton near Carlisle first thing, and I rode to Kendal, then train to Carlisle and cycled back to my car in Brampton -about 70 miles total. That day I did have breakfast before setting off, and we stopped for lunch in Appleby-in-Wetmoreland (no S because it didn't deserve it!). Much hillier terrain than my previous long ride, and I well remember the long haul up out of Appleby, having to weave from side to side as I strained to progress on my aging 5-speed road bike - while someone on a MTB pootled along nonchalently in bottom gear with legs moving faster than I can move mine at the best of times! Again, no after effects the next day despite again no preparation. The moral of this story is get a bike with lots of gears ( I soon bought a simple MTB bike and equipped it with road tyres, and more recently a road bike with the widest gear range of anything I could find, almost as low as a MTB and almost as high as a racing bike, so I can cope with most things a road throws at me. It is worth noting that my friend and her companions, doing typically at least 70-100 miles a day, were eating 3 big meals every day - and the consequence of that was apparently a struggle to reduce to normal eating afterwards -but that a was 1000 or so miles in total!

Clearly the fitter you are the easier it will be, and very likely the younger you are that might apply all the more - I might struggle more if I were to attempt today than 30 years ago - but I would happily attempt it, with my only preparation maybe a few more miles than my normal commute - someone's suggestion

On those two rides my bike had wire toe baskets, but they were deep enough for me to be able to pull as well as push - though I'm not sure that I pulled anywhere as near as much ad I pushed! And the bike, a cheap 1970s 5-speed drop-bar road bike was scarcely light or sophisticated like many today, so if you have something lighter, so much the better.

In case of rain, do take something truly waterproof to keep things like phone and anything else easily harmed by water - can be as simple as a knotted or clip-top plastic bag.

Clearly lots of good advice here; BUT at the risk of sounding like a know-it-all (which I'm not, just interested in going faster for less effort!)...

...its a miss-conception that you pull up on the non-driving leg - you don't, you merely offload that leg..  You actually 'scrape' through at the bottom of the pedal stroke, as if you are trying to scrape your foot along the ground having trod in dog poo.

see this:

http://www.brevet.cc/cycling-pedalling-technique/

This is where cleats work their magic since you get greater efficiency throughout the pedal stroke.  Too much time analysing my poor technique on a Wattbike i'm afraid...

As Innocent Bystander said you need to eat a lot to keep the energy flowing as you burn a hell of a lot of calories. According to my Garmin (which is only a rough guide I know) I burned 3500 calories on my 90 mile ride the other day. I set off with two bananas hanging out of my back pockets and two drinks bottles. All that soon went and I stopped off three times along the way for a mars bar, snickers and double decker bars. Also two cans of full fat coke and one sickly energy drink. I wasn't pigging out, I was bloody starving. 

If you don't keep up the energy intake you're gonna bonk and that's scary when you're miles from home. Especially on a damn mountain bike

winkyincanada posted:
naim_nymph posted:

...consider changing the outer chainring to a 48, 49, or 50 tooth, especially if the bike comes equipped with a 53 tooth chainring, you'll be able to stay on a smaller outer chainring for longer and be able to 'spin' it easier.

 

Debs

 

Deb, why do you think spending more time in the outer chain-ring is actually an advantage? I just don't get it. I ride in the gear that suits the speed I'm going so I have my preferred cadence. Whether that's using the inner or outer chain-ring depends on that speed (uphill, downhill, headwind, tailwind etc) . Otherwise it is of no real concern to me. I don't a have "preference" for one or the other.

 

Actually, i didn't say that outer ring use is an advantage over an inner ring, what i quite clearly said is the outer ring its easier to turn if it has less teeth, in which the intension should read as obvious, especially as my comment that you've quoted is preceded by:

"Learn to ride efficiently with a natural cadence of your own ability - this will probably be around 70 - 80 pedal rpm. Learn not to grind along in a gear that's too high".

Most brand new road bikes these days come with a 53 tooth outer chainring as standard on a double, or triple chainset, however; i'd guess 90% of Joe Cycling public would find it more practical and more fun that outer ring was a 50 tooth.

Also, being able to stay [and spin a good cadence easier] on a 48 or 50 outer ring [as opposed to a 53] isn't an opinion but a physical and mechanical advantageous fact, however, if Nigel chooses to ride a typical mountain bike for his c 2 c excursion, then this outer ring size discussion is academic.

SKDriver posted:

Clearly lots of good advice here; BUT at the risk of sounding like a know-it-all (which I'm not, just interested in going faster for less effort!)...

...its a miss-conception that you pull up on the non-driving leg - you don't, you merely offload that leg..  You actually 'scrape' through at the bottom of the pedal stroke, as if you are trying to scrape your foot along the ground having trod in dog poo.

see this:

http://www.brevet.cc/cycling-pedalling-technique/

This is where cleats work their magic since you get greater efficiency throughout the pedal stroke.  Too much time analysing my poor technique on a Wattbike i'm afraid...

Agree. They help smooth the top/bottom of the stroke. They have benefits for power but not via a very significant upward pull. They also keep our foot in the ideal position on the pedal at all times and by locking you in they help bike control too.  Finally they allow a rigid shoe that definitely improves power.

Nigel. Ignore this nerdness. Get comfy, get out there, have fun. It is meant to be a pleasure (rather like listening to music/Padded Cell) not a technical discipline (like the HiFi room). I would hate anyone to be put off the pleasures of cycling or indeed an exercise by technophiles.

 

Bruce

 

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