Do you have your system on its own dedicated ring on the house electrical supply?

FT, it depends of course where the DC offset is coming from and the nature of your other home wiring..if DC offset occurs on your phase between you and your high voltage step down transformer/sub station, as in my majority case , then having a separate radial will make no difference at all as far humming transformers.

Simon

Elkman - here you go :-

Note this is a UK installation, complies and has been certified to the latest regs.

In the meter cupboard, A Henley block splits the 25mm2 meter tails between the house consumer unit and the new Hi-Fi consumer unit. The incoming 16mm2 Earth cable is split here too. 

The meter sits on the other side of the wall from the consumer units in the garage. The new tails run through the wall and up the conduit into the new consumer unit. 

From the new consumer unit, a single 10mm2 T&E cable runs along the wall before heading up to the loft via a bedroom wardrobe. As the new radial is not RCD protected, the cable must be surface run to meet the regs which works fine for the installation cable route we decided on. 

A single 32A Type C MCB and Isolator switch. The Isolator switch should be 100A not the 63A fitted. The electrician is coming back to change it. 

As the lounge is on the opposite side of the house to the garage we needed an unbroken run of 25m T&E from the new consumer unit to the lounge. The cable runs up to and along the loft, exits the gable end wall and then makes the final drop down the wall inside conduit to the back of the new socket.

25m of cable later it terminates at a double un-switched socket, surface mounted to clear an existing HDMI cable chased into the wall for the TV. All i have left to do now is have the Isolator swapped to the correct rating (not that 63A is inadequate in anyway for this application) and get the engraved labels fitted for the lounge socket (stating it's for Hi-Fi use and not RCD Protected) and for the new consumer unit to show how this socket is isolated. 

Worth it ? definitely. For the price of a new Powerline, this has made a surprising difference to my enjoyment of the system. Greater clarity, the removal of some treble harshness which was noticeable on some albums and music has such a natural flow. Bass is tighter and deeper and an already very low noise floor is now even lower. Taking the system off the lounge ring and getting its supply (and Earth) as close to the incoming feed as possible has really benefited things more than i really expected. 

Thanks to all who have offered advice and guidance which made the process a lot simpler and finally made me get my arse into gear to get this done. My only regret is not doing it sooner ! 

 James

Simon-in-Suffolk posted:

FT, ..., then having a separate radial will make no difference at all as far humming transformers.

Simon

Indeed Simon. The BPS, not the dedicated radial, is there to knock out the  “DC offset” and with it the transformer hum in the Naim boxes. The transformers did hum when powered off a dedicated radial; it was installing the BPS that cured the hum.

It worked a treat to for us, though may not always do so for others.

FT

Yes     [following BtB's concise reply].

I've not got a separate distribution box for the dedicated rings-main, though I know that is preferred. Mine has it's own RCD in the general distribution box.  I installed the dedicated rings-main myself some years back (before regs limited who could do such work) and I used specialist mains-cable from Russ Andrews which is meant to resist RFI.  I did it to avoid the clicks and plops I had experienced over some time as other things in the house turned on and off.  These have been eradicated completely. What I hadn't experienced was an uplift in sound quality. As James says, this is a very cost effective upgrade. On the downside, it can be messy and disruptive. I had the floorboards up in the under-stairs cupboard, hall and lounge for several days when I did mine.  

Hi everyone I would like to do this with my system. I got one quote so far for £1200 which seems a bit steep but it does include plastering a small wall and boarding/skimming a ceiling.   What is the recommended backplate for the sockets?  I could use metal ones buried in the plaster, flush mounted plastic or office style trunking

John Hoptroff posted:

Hi everyone I would like to do this with my system. I got one quote so far for £1200 which seems a bit steep but it does include plastering a small wall and boarding/skimming a ceiling.   What is the recommended backplate for the sockets?  I could use metal ones buried in the plaster, flush mounted plastic or office style trunking

That seems a bit expensive to me, but hard to judge without knowing exactly what is involved. For neatness, I would go for recessed metal back boxes and buried cables if possible, but I can’t see any reason why surface mounting wouldn’t work just as well. 

Yes it does make a difference and it is well worth doing if you have the opportunity. I had a separate 2.5mm twin and earth spur for a few years and it made the background cleaner and darker, improving all aspects of the music. 

I then had a kitchen refit and had a new distribution board installed with circuit breakers for the new kitchen appliances BUT kept the original fuse box solely for the hifi. As the kitchen ceiling was down I ran a 10mm spur from it to unswitched Crabtree sockets in the lounge. Initially my electrician provided a circuit breaker for the hifi board but it was an old one and the sound was not as good as I was expecting or knew it could be based on my previous experience. By the way my electrician who was very sceptical of the whole idea heard the system  when I played Hotel California live from Hell Freezes over and he was completely astounded at how good the whole thing sounded.   I later replaced the carrier holding the old circuit breaker and fitted a wired fuse and carrier which lifted the sound even further.

In my experience it is a thoroughly worthwhile upgrade as long as it can be easily achieved from a structural point of view AND provided it is done safely.

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DaveBk
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