Lightning Strikes in south UK Tonite

ChrisSU posted:

The NDX (and presumably other streamers) use optical isolation, I assume as a way of isolating interference, but that isn’t going to help in a lightning strike. 

100% correct;  my house had a direct hit on the TV aerial,  everything electrical in the house was destroyed, even a guitar amp that was not even plugged in.  The only survivor was my old Rega Planer-3

Because a few nearby properties have been hit over the years - one destroyed with fire -  I have assumed we live in a prone area - but halfway up a hill of open fields & trees, its not obvious why this would be - I now unplug radio, TV, phone+BB & most all power plugs.   

but remember all complaint ethernet is galvanically isolated so as to remove the effects of common mode interference and ground loops from the network signal. Galvanic isolation often uses transformers or can use optical connection, but transformers typically offer better performance in a smaller space. Surges from lightning are handled differently

Chris I honestly would use twisted pair wiring for your ethernet in your house unless you have some very long distances to lay.. sure you twisted pair/phone line entering the house is above roof level - but for the most part a direct or nearby strike will as you say destroy the master socket (as it is designed to do with lightning surge protector that goes short circuit) but even so the lightning current will jump spaces and find the shortest path to earth, If you are in a particularly exposed area you can get specialised earthed phone /twisted pair line surge protectors - but even here a direct hit will still probably cause collateral damage either immediately or hasten the failure of components/devices in the house.

I suggest the only truly safest thing to do is unplug all mains devices with electronic components  and phone socket connections, aerial connections - and don't forget Satellite TV coax connections from your STB (which I suspect is quite a source of issues as people forget about it and many STB are not earthed)... then any induced voltages in your ethernet wiring through the ionised air should be dealt with unless you are really unlucky assuming your devices are ethernet compliant 

We had a very close hit yesterday evening. A sizzling zap with a simultaneous CRACK! which,. along with the briefly blinding light, nearly knocked us off the sofa in shock. We were already unplugged. I've only witnessed one direct hit which was on the roof of the building I worked at in London. Dozens of blown pieces of equipment and damaged 13 amp sockets. I saw flames and sparks shoot out of one socket when the lightning hit our roof. Not the sort of thing easily forgotten or treaded lightly.

I was on a via ferrata route in the Dolomites, hanging off a rock outcrop when it started raining like a female dog. According to the rest of my group who were a little below me, a lightning bolt hit the steel cable about 50m up from me. It was, erm, a memorable experience which I’ve filed under ‘Terrifying, try to avoid in future’.

Mark

Simon-in-Suffolk posted:

Interesting.. forecast for the Suffolk coast is breeze and mist with drizzle on and off throughout the day... we might need the weather forecasts a little more specific perhaps? The southern half of the UK is everything south of approx York is it not Mike? 

Weather track is SE to NE,  looks like a large patch of drizzle heading your way Simon

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joerand posted:

Page 2 of this stuff. Really? And some say the forum has become boring

Remember we’’re taliking British Isles weather here - where we tend to have it a lot more unpredictable and variable than many other places, and so is always a major topic of conversation (and a common ice-breaker when opening conversations (pun intended).

where I am in the Britidh Isles the topic of conversation is fog, with cancelled flights and concern whether it will clear enough to allow certain road activity later - here thunderstorms thankfully are rare, and no threat in recent days.

Ghettoyout posted:

Just like to point out that tonight is spelt tonight and not tonite. Thank you for the notification though.

I'm fully aware & admit to mischief to see if it arouses any comment;  is it considered as bad as the grocer's apostrophe?   

Innocent Bystander posted:
joerand posted:

Page 2 of this stuff. Really? And some say the forum has become boring

Remember we’’re taliking British Isles weather here - where we tend to have it a lot more unpredictable and variable than many other places, and so is always a major topic of conversation (and a common ice-breaker when opening conversations (pun intended).

where I am in the Britidh Isles the topic of conversation is fog, with cancelled flights and concern whether it will clear enough to allow certain road activity later - here thunderstorms thankfully are rare, and no threat in recent days.

Fair enough. Anyone can talk about local weather and it's always a safe subject of conversation. Just begs the question for me - why is this topic in the Hi-Fi Corner?

FWIW - my gear has been plugged in continuously since September. The weather in the Puget Sound lowlands today was a mix of sun and clouds with a late afternoon shower. Any interest in me posting a Doppler image next time a thunder storm rolls through my region and whether I chose to leave my gear plugged in?

Joerand, I left the topic in the Hifi Corner because I adjudged it was more of a hifi topic - regarding the imminent risk for some (quite a number of forum members live in and around the affected area) of lightning strikes possibly affecting their Naim systems - than a general discussion of the weather. Keeping it in the Hifi Corner ensured that it would have the widest possible exposure on the forum -  if it saves even just one member the heartbreak of lightning damage then it's all been worthwhile.  Bear in mind that in the UK and particularly in the south east of the country, you have mostly overhead wires - indeed, our own mains feed comes across two fields and is three exposed copper cables (it should have been updated years ago, so i'm told, but I guess it's expensive).  Just below is the telephone cable, which shares the pylons to save costs.  

Hi Joe,  I accept I'm guilty as charged,  but the title line is for south UK.   The map on the opening post is showing lightning strikes,  not rain (doppler radar).   That night was a bit exceptional with period of continuous all around light & noise,  but it turned out to not be so damaging as it was mostly inter-cloud rather than ground strikes.    

The nearby European mainland had it even worse & over a longer period looking at the strike mapping.  I do know some of the countries have better protective building regulations than does UK,  but if this thread at least re-reminded Naim owners everywhere to think about it,  well & good.                

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