Nice Photos.

seakayaker posted:
count.d posted:
seakayaker posted:

 

South Park Bridge

Lovely shot seakayaker. How did you produce the slight black glow around the shadow detail?

If memory serves me right I was using one of the HDR effects in the NIK software tools. NIK was a small company that developed digital software tools that Google had purchased. Google has since sole the rights to DxO. A blurb from their website,  "Nik Collection by DxO is a series of 7 creative plugins for MacOS*, Windows* and Adobe CC, providing filters, rendering and photography retouching tools to create stunning images."  When I bought the software years ago it was a couple of hundred US dollars, google offered the software as free download for awhile, DxO offers the package for $69.00 and a fun tool for folks who enjoy photography. 

Thanks sea kayaker. I was hoping you'd say it was something via Photoshop , but I'll take a look at the software.

count.d posted:
seakayaker posted:
count.d posted:
seakayaker posted:

 

South Park Bridge

Lovely shot seakayaker. How did you produce the slight black glow around the shadow detail?

If memory serves me right I was using one of the HDR effects in the NIK software tools. NIK was a small company that developed digital software tools that Google had purchased. Google has since sole the rights to DxO. A blurb from their website,  "Nik Collection by DxO is a series of 7 creative plugins for MacOS*, Windows* and Adobe CC, providing filters, rendering and photography retouching tools to create stunning images."  When I bought the software years ago it was a couple of hundred US dollars, google offered the software as free download for awhile, DxO offers the package for $69.00 and a fun tool for folks who enjoy photography. 

Thanks sea kayaker. I was hoping you'd say it was something via Photoshop , but I'll take a look at the software.

A similar effect is pretty easy in Photoshop. Create a duplicate layer, apply a Gaussian blur to that layer then increase its transparency to taste so that the sharp original layer shows through. It seems to work best on grey-scale and sepia (and similar) images, but some colour images can look OK, too. It can be very flattering on portraits if not over-done (which it usually is - think "glamour" shoots).

Haim Ronen posted:

Seakayaker. if it is not too much of a burden, perhaps you could show us the image without the filter application? Looking at the sky I am wondering if you are also getting a color shift.

I took a quick look for the original image on a couple of hard drives but could not locate it, I have a couple dozen memory cards around but can not locate them at the moment. I have a tendency to discard images once I am finished working with them. If they are not going to be printed I usually don't keep. The image I used was from an "image a day project" I worked on awhile ago on a web site called "Blipfoto."

Haim Ronen posted:

After the rain

After the rain

One of the plants around the house which insist on remaining dry during the rainfall and only once in a while allow a droplet to rest before rolling to the ground. 

Great photo Haim. FWIW - from an ecological perspective the plant is channeling water immediately to its roots. Water left on the leaves would be subject to evaporation and of no use to the plant. Plants with a downward-draping, umbrella-like shape direct water to the perimeter of their canopy and moisten the roots there; typically a wide-reaching shallow root system. The plant in your picture, with it's upright leaves, appears to be directing moisture towards the trunk; typically a narrower and deeper root system. Useful minutiae for where best to direct the flow when watering outdoor plants during dry conditions. 

winkyincanada posted:

A similar effect is pretty easy in Photoshop. Create a duplicate layer, apply a Gaussian blur to that layer then increase its transparency to taste so that the sharp original layer shows through. It seems to work best on grey-scale and sepia (and similar) images, but some colour images can look OK, too. It can be very flattering on portraits if not over-done (which it usually is - think "glamour" shoots).

The effect seakayaka has achieved is similar to what I used to do in film days. Black net over the lens to bleed the shadows/blacks without bleeding the highlights. The Photoshop gaussian blur bleeds everything without selecting specific parts. I just though there may be a simple all in one filter app to do this fast.

Fabio 1 posted:

Concrete dynosaur,may I?

It is indeed - and a costly one too. Several of these bridges were built in the nineties to basically "bridge" the rural coastal communities with the mainland. Our continental coastline is about 25 148 km long and many of these communities still exists thanks to transportation based on fossil fuels. These bridges together with off-shore servicing, fish farming, fishing and daily commute to the larger towns makes it possible to have a somewhat decentralized population. The main way of transportation is based on the car and there is no viable alternative.

This is photograph of a photograph, but the painting is now believed to date from 36,000 years ago (twice as old as those at Lascaux). Just incredible. The oldest human art known to exist. The artists even used the contours of the wall to make the images appear to move when lit by the flickering flames of a torch or fat-lamp.

Caverne du Pont d'Arc (Chauvet Cave), discovered in 1994 having been sealed for at least 21,000 years by successive rock-falls.

The entire thing has been recreated from digitised 3d photographs and measurements, and cast in resin and concrete, printed and painted to make an exact duplicate which you can visit. I didn't think a 'fake' could impress me, but this really did!

rodwsmith posted:

This is photograph of a photograph, but the painting is now believed to date from 36,000 years ago (twice as old as those at Lascaux). Just incredible. The oldest human art known to exist. The artists even used the contours of the wall to make the images appear to move when lit by the flickering flames of a torch or fat-lamp.

Caverne du Pont d'Arc (Chauvet Cave), discovered in 1994 having been sealed for at least 21,000 years by successive rock-falls.

The entire thing has been recreated from digitised 3d photographs and measurements, and cast in resin and concrete, printed and painted to make an exact duplicate which you can visit. I didn't think a 'fake' could impress me, but this really did!

That is remarkable! So much of the later cultural artifacts seems so much cruder. Thanks for posting!

rodwsmith posted:

This is photograph of a photograph, but the painting is now believed to date from 36,000 years ago (twice as old as those at Lascaux). Just incredible. The oldest human art known to exist. The artists even used the contours of the wall to make the images appear to move when lit by the flickering flames of a torch or fat-lamp.

Caverne du Pont d'Arc (Chauvet Cave), discovered in 1994 having been sealed for at least 21,000 years by successive rock-falls.

The entire thing has been recreated from digitised 3d photographs and measurements, and cast in resin and concrete, printed and painted to make an exact duplicate which you can visit. I didn't think a 'fake' could impress me, but this really did!

Probably the first stock market analysis ever, using bulls and bears as symbols for anticipated directions.

Kevin-W posted:
Mr Fjeld posted:

A bridge too far

Nice one Christian! Where was that taken?

Thanks Kevin - much appreciated

It's from the Rong straits on the west coast outside the town of Bergen. It's a beautiful barren and wild place.

And finally the last bridge photo for a while EmptyName 107

rodwsmith posted:

This is photograph of a photograph, but the painting is now believed to date from 36,000 years ago (twice as old as those at Lascaux). Just incredible. The oldest human art known to exist. The artists even used the contours of the wall to make the images appear to move when lit by the flickering flames of a torch or fat-lamp.

Caverne du Pont d'Arc (Chauvet Cave), discovered in 1994 having been sealed for at least 21,000 years by successive rock-falls.

The entire thing has been recreated from digitised 3d photographs and measurements, and cast in resin and concrete, printed and painted to make an exact duplicate which you can visit. I didn't think a 'fake' could impress me, but this really did!

Funnily enough we’re in the vicinity of Lascaux right now and I would like to visit,  not sure I can convince the family. Though anything to get out of the 39* heat may sway them...

There is a recreation of Lascaux, but it is neither as comprehensive nor convincing as the Chauvet facsimile (which was made recently with no expense spared and state-of-the-art technology). Perhaps it is at least air-conditioned!

The experience of opening the actual Lascaux cave to the public caused the exhaled CO2 and other human influences to create acids, mildews, and even a particular mould, which have all but destroyed the paintings. It has been closed for decades now. Hence Chauvet is sealed and opened only for suitably equipped masked and covered scientists and even then not very often. The exception was the film-maker Werner Herzog who was allowed to make a 3d Documentary - which was in part used for the facsimile along with all the various other measurements and photographs. 

Worth watching: Cave of Forgotten Dreams. (Links to Wikipedia entry. Film is on Youtube and Netflix in some countries.)

More of the images:

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Don AtkinsonIvo BHaim RonenoldneilrobgrMikeT.FangfossFlyerSteve JQuad 33Former MemberKevin-WCbr600
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