On rightmove.co right now, a Nap 500 and associated equiptment. Potential Burglar alert!

Tony Lockhart posted:

How often is top end hifi stolen in burglaries?

I remember some years ago there was an attempted break-in at the Naim factory.  I think that the main target of the attempted theft was a 50" Fujitsu Plasma screen.  They had only got it so far before giving up.  The alarm was tripped and they were doubtless finding its sheer weight and size somewhat more than they had bargained for, so had scarpered to avoid getting nicked.  However, we noticed that rather closer to their point of entry and exit was a trolley full of NAC552s that had been checked over by Roy and were awaiting packaging. There must have been 60 or 70 grands worth on that trolley but it had been completely ignored by the burglars.

Yes, the danger of the internet. I do think it is unwise to have pictures up on estate agents’ sites displaying expensive stuff - and as estate agents seem to have not a care about anything but making their commission as fast as possible (with apologies if there are any on here who are different from the vast majority based on my experience), the seller needs to guide them when they are taking pictures, and approve anything before publication. 

Mind you, it is rare to see any sort of serious hifi in houses for sale, and it seems to bemuse estate agents showing me around a house when I spent time in the lounge discussing with my wife where the speakers would be most likely to go - that, the kitchen and the garden being the only things we pay much attention to, not how many ensuites there are, whether the master bedroom is the biggest in the street, or how nice and neutral the colour scheme is...

Just to refresh a topic from some years ago, I hope that any forum members posting in the "System Pics" topic, for example, are aware that photos taken on many digital devices include GPS metadata within the file, and that this information is easily recoverable by a third party.

The answer is to disable this GPS function in one's camera or phone. 

dave marshall posted:

Just to refresh a topic from some years ago, I hope that any forum members posting in the "System Pics" topic, for example, are aware that photos taken on many digital devices include GPS metadata within the file, and that this information is easily recoverable by a third party.

The answer is to disable this GPS function in one's camera or phone. 

The forum disables location info by default on posted photos - unless you configure it otherwise in your profile. 

Richard Dane posted:

I remember some years ago there was an attempted break-in at the Naim factory.  I think that the main target of the attempted theft was a 50" Fujitsu Plasma screen.  [...] However, we noticed that rather closer to their point of entry and exit was a trolley full of NAC552s that had been checked over by Roy and were awaiting packaging. There must have been 60 or 70 grands worth on that trolley but it had been completely ignored by the burglars.

I remember reading (maybe apocryphal) about a Hi-Fi enthusiast who was burgled... gone was the Sony DVD player and Panasonic TV, while the Naim stack was left untouched.  Some burglars have no taste :-)

So the moral would appear to be: if you have expensive hifi (or other stuff), have some populist easily shiftable items clearly visible fo burglars to spot and take. 

However, better for online pictures traceable to your home not to show specialist things that could be targeted by people in the know  ...and not other things of interest to burglars so they don’t think your home is worth bothering with at all.

Most would-be theives are too thick to notice. In my estiamtion if you told them there are amplifiers that cost $1,000 they'd think you were lying. I'd not worry about it to be honest.

At a shop I worked at once, some theives tried to ramraid us in the middle of the night. Except the shop was in a padenstrianised streat with concrete bolards at the end. They mowed over a bolard which must have nearly written off their vehicle. Broke the front glass of the shop. There were Linn and Naim active systems galore to be had but what did they take? A single Quad ESL 63. Not the pair. A single one. Nor did they touch the Quad 6 system that was connected to it.

Numbnuts.

feeling_zen posted:

Most would-be theives are too thick to notice. In my estiamtion if you told them there are amplifiers that cost $1,000 they'd think you were lying. I'd not worry about it to be honest.

At a shop I worked at once, some theives tried to ramraid us in the middle of the night. Except the shop was in a padenstrianised streat with concrete bolards at the end. They mowed over a bolard which must have nearly written off their vehicle. Broke the front glass of the shop. There were Linn and Naim active systems galore to be had but what did they take? A single Quad ESL 63. Not the pair. A single one. Nor did they touch the Quad 6 system that was connected to it.

Numbnuts.

Sounds more like the ESL was stolen to order and so picked up first - and that they were disturbed and so made a quick getaway

feeling_zen posted:

Most would-be theives are too thick to notice. In my estiamtion if you told them there are amplifiers that cost $1,000 they'd think you were lying. I'd not worry about it to be honest.

At a shop I worked at once, some theives tried to ramraid us in the middle of the night. Except the shop was in a padenstrianised streat with concrete bolards at the end. They mowed over a bolard which must have nearly written off their vehicle. Broke the front glass of the shop. There were Linn and Naim active systems galore to be had but what did they take? A single Quad ESL 63. Not the pair. A single one. Nor did they touch the Quad 6 system that was connected to it.

Numbnuts.

Very true, back in 1992 I had my MG Montego stolen from the drive at the back of the house the car was found a couple of days later minus the stereo and a small tool box from the boot.

The  boxed Naim Hi Cap that I had put in the boot the previous evening to take to the dealer the following day in P/X for a new Supercap was still in the boot, worth considerably more than the value of the stolen stereo

Innocent Bystander posted:
feeling_zen posted:

Most would-be theives are too thick to notice. In my estiamtion if you told them there are amplifiers that cost $1,000 they'd think you were lying. I'd not worry about it to be honest.

At a shop I worked at once, some theives tried to ramraid us in the middle of the night. Except the shop was in a padenstrianised streat with concrete bolards at the end. They mowed over a bolard which must have nearly written off their vehicle. Broke the front glass of the shop. There were Linn and Naim active systems galore to be had but what did they take? A single Quad ESL 63. Not the pair. A single one. Nor did they touch the Quad 6 system that was connected to it.

Numbnuts.

Sounds more like the ESL was stolen to order and so picked up first - and that they were disturbed and so made a quick getaway

Nah. Blatently the closest item to where the car came through the glass.

I bet even to this day, some git is sitting in his dank lounge thinking "this bleedin radiator is naff. It can't even dry my socks after be switched on for hours".

feeling_zen posted:

Most would-be theives are too thick to notice. In my estiamtion if you told them there are amplifiers that cost $1,000 they'd think you were lying. I'd not worry about it to be honest.

At a shop I worked at once, some theives tried to ramraid us in the middle of the night. Except the shop was in a padenstrianised streat with concrete bolards at the end. They mowed over a bolard which must have nearly written off their vehicle. Broke the front glass of the shop. There were Linn and Naim active systems galore to be had but what did they take? A single Quad ESL 63. Not the pair. A single one. Nor did they touch the Quad 6 system that was connected to it.

Numbnuts.

Thieves take stuff they can remove and sell on quickly and easily, for obvious reasons. Leave your iPhone and a 555 on display, and chances are the 555 will be left behind. 

I had a leather bag containing a lot of very expensive items stolen from the desk at my office, in the middle of the day.  Somebody just waltzed right in, grabbed it & ran.  The bag contained an Astell & Kern AK380, Edition 8 headphones, a portable headphone amp, a couple of nice Mont Blanc pens, cheque books, banking information, and an iPad.  After swearing a blue streak for a few minutes, I almost cried.  I think that I was most upset by the loss of my portable sound system & all of the music that had taken hours to load.  Of course, I was most inconvenienced by the loss of the cheques & other banking info. The police were useless - I actually tracked down the bag thru the Find function on the iPad, located it in a run-down trailer park 3 km from the office, right down to the unit in the trailer park.  The police said they knew who lived there, having had run-ins with them in the past.  However I was told that there was nothing  they could do to retrieve my stolen items.  Since then, things get locked up in my office.  Also, thank God for insurance.

docmark posted:

I had a leather bag containing a lot of very expensive items stolen from the desk at my office, in the middle of the day.  Somebody just waltzed right in, grabbed it & ran.  The bag contained an Astell & Kern AK380, Edition 8 headphones, a portable headphone amp, a couple of nice Mont Blanc pens, cheque books, banking information, and an iPad.  After swearing a blue streak for a few minutes, I almost cried.  I think that I was most upset by the loss of my portable sound system & all of the music that had taken hours to load.  Of course, I was most inconvenienced by the loss of the cheques & other banking info. The police were useless - I actually tracked down the bag thru the Find function on the iPad, located it in a run-down trailer park 3 km from the office, right down to the unit in the trailer park.  The police said they knew who lived there, having had run-ins with them in the past.  However I was told that there was nothing  they could do to retrieve my stolen items.  Since then, things get locked up in my office.  Also, thank God for insurance.

Oh that’s very distressing. I am feeling sorry for you. My girlfriend was robbed as well yesterday, and it really hurts.

docmark posted:

...The police were useless ...

I wonder if it was the same trailer park. We got robbed once back when I still lived in the UK and narrowly missed them. As we were walking home, we saw a white van parked on our front lawn. Which was really odd. We were a longs ways off so took down the license number as it sped off. We saw no one get into it so they were already inside.

When we finally got in the front door we found the place had been ransacked. Two Linn systems and an Arcam system in 3 different rooms untouched. But they had ransacked every drawer in the house for valuables (of which we had none). 

Reported it to the police with the license number. They found it, picked up a couple of lads. Then they let them go because "They didn't cry. Innocent people don't cry". Then it got surreal, the police accused us of being racist bigots for pointing the finger at gypsies. 

Of course we didn't know they had picked up gypsies until they just said so while berating us. We only gave them a license number and a van colour. I tell you there are not enough jokes about the smells of bacon, coffee and donuts in the world to do justice to how useless and offensive our local coppers were.

Eloise posted:
Richard Dane posted:

I remember some years ago there was an attempted break-in at the Naim factory.  I think that the main target of the attempted theft was a 50" Fujitsu Plasma screen.  [...] However, we noticed that rather closer to their point of entry and exit was a trolley full of NAC552s that had been checked over by Roy and were awaiting packaging. There must have been 60 or 70 grands worth on that trolley but it had been completely ignored by the burglars.

I remember reading (maybe apocryphal) about a Hi-Fi enthusiast who was burgled... gone was the Sony DVD player and Panasonic TV, while the Naim stack was left untouched.  Some burglars have no taste :-)

That is exactly what happened to me - the burglars took a cheap Yamaha tuner which they thought looked far more impressive than the CB NAC/NAP on the shelf above...

docmark posted:

I had a leather bag containing a lot of very expensive items stolen from the desk at my office, in the middle of the day.  Somebody just waltzed right in, grabbed it & ran.  The bag contained an Astell & Kern AK380, Edition 8 headphones, a portable headphone amp, a couple of nice Mont Blanc pens, cheque books, banking information, and an iPad.  After swearing a blue streak for a few minutes, I almost cried.  I think that I was most upset by the loss of my portable sound system & all of the music that had taken hours to load.  Of course, I was most inconvenienced by the loss of the cheques & other banking info. The police were useless - I actually tracked down the bag thru the Find function on the iPad, located it in a run-down trailer park 3 km from the office, right down to the unit in the trailer park.  The police said they knew who lived there, having had run-ins with them in the past.  However I was told that there was nothing  they could do to retrieve my stolen items.  Since then, things get locked up in my office.  Also, thank God for insurance.

It is absolutely ridiculous and abhorrent that thevpolice cannot act directly when they have such information, when a warrant for entry to the trailer should be readily and immediately given on the basis of the iphone location evidence, and the iphone immedoately interrogated - with unlocking info provided by you together with details of content of the iphone. Successful confirmation of that (the trailer occupant given the opportunity to give that first) would be sufficient evidence to remove into police custody the items described by you and take it to court. 

But of course to the overstretched police it is a low value crime and no-one was killed or seriously interested so not worth the time and effort. And then the legal system often seems designed to protect the criminal’s “rights” in some way, perhaps tge police banned from harassing that particular perpetrator.

And that just adds insult ti injury, and makes one wonder why we even have a legal system that is either ineffective, designed for the wrong thing, or bent.

When I was working in Sweden, I met a colleague who was living in the weekend in the countryside. He told me that they had organized justice themselves in their town since the police is so busy with the new swedes. I got to know a few stories from him.

In our society we have some 'institutions' which don't work good these days, and police is one of them. Freightening, since it is an important piece of how our society is politically, legally and socially constructed.

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