SL2

Without wishing to be a pain, but the big metal plates (the floor stand bits) should not have been removed from the base of the speakers. The tweeters should not have been removed from the top of the support arm. I suggest you get precise instructions from Naim as to how to fit these together and you will certainly need a very good torque screwdriver. Getting the speaker rocking on the sprung base is critical to performance and I have a suspicion that they may have to go to Salisbury to be sorted out. I have no idea what whoever packed them was thinking of, and why they didn't simply follow the instructions. Sorry. 

HH is spot on. I looked at the photos and wondered why so many pieces. As long as it has been done with care should be no harm done.

They are lovely things so I'm sure will be worth it to get them installed by a dealer or re-assembled into the conventional set of components by Salisbury.

As for siting them the only thing I would add is that once set up and in position (no toe-in for me) I found they 'bedded in' and improved substantially over a week or more. Let this happen before tweaking position, chips etc. Mine are spiked into a wood floor. Not sure if it was just the spikes bedding in or that the speaker etc needed a bit of run in after several months in a box. I actually suspected the latter.

I struggle to see the logic of chips paced on top of carpet. Speaker is just floating on the carpet then surely?

Bruce

 

Mark, Tony, thank you for your replies (yes Mark, I too have suffered the frustrations of correct alignment), just wanted to know i was not "missing a trick" here. S3, they look fabulous, reminds me of when I first got mine home (after a 200 mile round trip to collect them after acquiring them from a famous auction site). I'm sure, with a bit of set up care (use Richards excellent instructions) they will blow you away. Keep us posted.

Mark, Tony, thank you for your replies (yes Mark, I too have suffered the frustrations of correct alignment), just wanted to know i was not "missing a trick" here. S3, they look fabulous, reminds me of when I first got mine home (after a 200 mile round trip to collect them after acquiring them from a famous auction site). I'm sure, with a bit of set up care (use Richards excellent instructions) they will blow you away. Keep us posted.

Thanks guys. I spoke with Customer Service at Naim. The view was that I should be able to re-attach the plinth and the tweeters to the arms myself so I will try to do that. If I am unable to get it right then I think I'll need to get them back to base via my dealer but I hope that will not be necessary. Let's see.

I have removed the plinths from the tweeter arms and put the bottom cabinet upside down. These are the fixings I have been supplied with:

 

 

The 8 black items to the right of the PIPs are curious. I can only think that they are what the previous owner used to sit his spikes on (i.e. floor protector fraim alternatives).

Do the 8 black additional nuts sit above the plinth to hold the spikes in place so you end up with one nut above and one nut below the plinth in each spike corner?

I believe the 8 steel screws at the top of the picture are to screw the passive crossover units in place. The rubber doughnuts that Richard mentions in his instructions are sited on the corners of the crossovers themselves.

Below is where I've got to with fixing the base plinths:

 

It seems straightforward. 2 blots screw in at the front and I assume that the three black screws fix the cross plat to the base of the cabinet? I'm aware that this plate needs to be "loose" so slightly confused as to how that is possible with the screws in place.

Any comments / observations gratefully received!

So I've got this far following the set up instructions:

Clearly some adjustments needed. The tweeter plate was stuck fast and I am struggling to shift it. I don't want to use too much force pushing from the inside or pulling with the top box on its back in case I damage it. 

It looks as though two adjustments are required:

(I) to raise the tweeter slightly; and

(ii) to bring it forward slightly to be flush with the plate

it looks ok in terms of its lateral position.

I made sure the tweeter arm was properly seated in the base at the start per the instructions but the only way I can think to raise the tweeter position is to raise the bar so that it would no longer be fully seated in its plinth brackets.

Is that what I need to do or is there another way to make these adjustments?

Many thanks in advance  for your help!

Kind regards 

just checking -- i'm sure you are aware of these issues anyhow -- but worth re-iterating:

i am assuming you have adjusted the bottom spikes such that (a) the back two spikes mate with the back floor protectors more or less at the same time (b) when you made adjustments -- make sure the top box is NOT in place -- i.e. you only have the bottom box, with the TSA attached. (c) further to (a) -- make sure the TSA verticals are indeed vertical (d) make sure the front of the speaker is level -- check with spirit level on top of the curvy front -(d) also check back to back and side to side levelness (e) to be sure -- there should be no rocking when you have adjusted all spikes accordingly.

when you have covered these points -- the TSA should more or less self centre in the upper box -- provided of course the plate is correctly positioned.  of course you may need to make small adjustments by loosening this place, with emphasis on 'small'. if you find having to make large adjustments -- may be time to check all the above points, again. a few well chosen swear words always help to keep morale up!

i have a problem with my RHS SL2 caused by the fact that the floor in my office is not level -- it slopes towards the wall -- so i have had to make adjustments to take that into account -- a damn nuisance -- haven't done that too well really , so i intend to revisit over Easter to fix this if i have the strength.

Good luck. Keep trying -- can be frustrating -- but extremely rewarding when you get it right in the end. I find that it gets easier when you get used to it.

and enjoy...

ken

 

Many thanks Ken and HH. I managed to free the front plate (using a lot of force!) and have improved the position somewhat. 

It is now more or less flush with the plate but still needs to be raised up a couple of mm.

The base unit is level. Fortunately I'm working on a pretty level floor surface. The plate has been brought down as far as it can go while enabling the bolts to find their holes.

It seems that the only other thing I could do to raise the tweeter would be to lift the arm up slightly in its base housing. However I thought it was important that the arm remained seated as far down as it would go so that seems like the wrong thing to do.

Any ideas?

 Thanks - I'm really enjoying this!!

Yes, you will have to lift the arm. It's not uncommon and not a bad thing either - less contact surface in theory means more decoupling. Tighten the arm bolts just sufficiently to hold the arm in place then jiggle it up to centre it - you may even consider raising the plate a bit. Using a small spirit level or smart phone with a level app in it, try jiggling things so that the rear of the tweeter plate is level, then tighten firmly but don't go mad - it's not that difficult to strip the threads. If you haven;t already done so - ensure the top plate of the bottom box is level before doing any of this.

As I understand it, it should not be necessary to raise the support arms - it's hard enough to get them tight without lifting them out of the slots. There should be enough scope in the front plates. I'm wondering if the base is attached exactly right, given that it should not have been removed. 

Neither of my two pairs of SL2s have needed the arms lifting, which is why I think it should not be needed. But Mike has owned them as well, so may be quite right. I'd suggest a call to Naim in the morning to check. It's essential to get the setup exactly right, or they won't perform as they should. Maybe Richard can advise, as he's a bit of an expert on them. 

Thanks HH. I suspect you are right and that is certainly what Richard's excellent instructions say. Interestingly the SL2 manual says that adjustments can be made to align the tweeter via the two bolts holding the assembly in place (presumably up or down) and via the front plate. Anyway I've managed to get the tweeters in reasonable position:

So I might connect them up and see how they sound. These may not be there final position but I don't mind doing all this again if needs be. I certainly felt I was improving at each attempt and it is great fun!

The Ovators are essentially 3 separate boxes in one, and as such retain some of the qualities of the earlier separate box speakers without the faffage. My 400s are simple to place and care free. I would not bother with the earlier separate box speakers, which I am sure are superb in their own way, but I don't need the aggravation.

S3 posted:

Thanks HH. I suspect you are right and that is certainly what Richard's excellent instructions say. Interestingly the SL2 manual says that adjustments can be made to align the tweeter via the two bolts holding the assembly in place (presumably up or down) and via the front plate. Anyway I've managed to get the tweeters in reasonable position:

So I might connect them up and see how they sound. These may not be there final position but I don't mind doing all this again if needs be. I certainly felt I was improving at each attempt and it is great fun!

looks very well centred to me (can you post a more closeup photo?) -- well worth the effort -- congratulations! what did you do?

if you ever need to reset them -- you will find it a lot easier and you will also find yourself developing your own techniques to get the best out of them.

Its a fascinating transparent  design (meaning the mechanics are not wholly hidden) and i can see you are not put off by comments from folks who don't own them. Mark of owner of this elite speaker.  No plonk and players here...

if the rest of the system is up to it, you will be amply rewarded -- that i know for sure...

enjoy...

ken

They look beautifully centred, so well done. How far from the wall are they - they look quite a way out, but it may be the picture. I found the optimum to be four or five inches. 

As for why the faff - it's because you can get them for around £2,000 and they are bloody brilliant. Some things really are worth the effort. Mine took about two hours to set up, and they have sat untouched - but much played and enjoyed - for nearly two years now. That doesn't sound like a bad use of time. 

What's a bit strange here is that I've never had to actually raise the tweeter arm in its mounts, and if anything the opposite, i.e. to put downward pressure on the arm as the bolts are tightened to ensure the arm locates right into the bottom of the mount.  I'm not entirely sure why you have had this issue - maybe a tolerance that I'm not aware of.  Are you sure the base is OK?  Is the rear spring working properly? The base was carefully set up at the factory during the build and was never designed to be taken apart by the customer...

Anyway, it looks like the tweeter is well centred, so that's good.  The face plate can get a little stuck so best to loosen off the retaining bolts and then carefully push out from behind to unstick it. The tweeter arm should be very firmly located in the mounts so it's rigid/stiff.  You will need to tighten to the limit here - just don't round out the bolts. Any looseness here is a problem as it doesn't allow the sprung base to work properly.

Thanks guys. I've connected them up with 5m of NACA5 and put the grills on.

Richard - The base plinth is a strange one. It was very straightforward to fit back on. Just two bolts at the front and three screws at the rear. I was in two minds as to whether to screw in the three black screws to the rear:

As I know that this cross plate is supposed to be loose and screwing in fixes it. I screwed them in in the end as I thought if they were not supposed to be used then why on earth would there be holes in the plinth.

Could you explain what is meant by the leaf spring as I am hearing how critical it is but can not work out exactly what or where it is?

 

As the base is never supposed to be taken apart I've never paid too much attention as to exactly what goes where in putting it together - I guess I should take a look at my own SL2s.  It'll have to wait though until I'm back at the weekend. In the meantime you could check with Naim HQ.

The way to check that the suspension is working - I think I mentioned this in my first reply - is to rap the top of the base box with your knuckles and to see if it oscillates and slowly stops moving. The tweeter should not move. If it does not oscillate, something is not right. Give it a go and report back, if you would. 

Thanks Richard. I'd appreciate that.

HH they are just under a foot out from the wall. I just wanted to try them in the optimum position first just to see how they sound. If they work there then it saves me reorganising the entire room and moving my work station to where the rig is currently. I will do that if necessary but I thought why not just try the SL2s where my X2s were to see how they go.

So far they sound very very good! Very detailed and great imaging. Bass seems a touch light but I'll give it time. After all the NACA5 is brand new do will need to burn in.

If I rap the top of the base unit on the left speaker it does rock a bit back and forward but not much. The tweeter moves too when I do this.

The right speaker moved but not only back and forth. It moved a little to the side too. So I checked that the rear spikes were both firmly grounded and the back right was just off. I tightened it which moved the tweeter off centre so had to then adjust the front plate again to get it back cantered. When I rap it now it moves back and forth like the left one.

In both cases the tweeter moves as well. Is that a problem?

This is why I suspect there is an issue with the base being removed. The base sits on the floor. The tweeter is fixed to the base. The main speaker is on a leaf spring and moves independently of the tweeter. That's how the tweeter is kept separate and what helps the extraordinary treble quality of the speaker. I'm not convinced that the base is properly attached to the speaker, but may be wrong of course.

And they do need to be near the wall. 

I redid mine a couple of weekends ago Which I felt was necessary due to some tweaking i.ve been doing with my pair.  Richard's instruction really do help get it done right.  I found the technique of levelling the front them tilting the speaker back and forth on the front spikes to level the rear spikes really did the trick.   Compared to the first time setting them up I found it quite enjoyable.  I guess the more you do it the more you get to know the speakers and appreciate the concepts behind their construction.

I have never quite understood the HH test re rapping on the boxes and 'the tweeter does not move'. The bottom boxes of mine definitely move if pushed but the tweeter assembly stays the same position-which makes it move relative to the top box aperture until the box stops swaying.

is this is a healthy 'positive HH test'? If not they sound lovely anyway....

Incidentally the tweeter does not fit perfectly in the top box aperture, it is very slightly off centre (sitting a bit low) but I assumed as long as it is clear on all sides this was not a problem. It also lays absolutely flush with the front of the box, a function of getting the whole thing level and the tweeter arms vertical I think.

I found the bass of mine improved over several weeks after installing. I assumed this was the speakers loosening up after a period in storage. It was quite obvious anyway so be patient with yours.

Bruce

Hi, In Richard's instructions it says;

"7. Because of the leaf spring at the rear, getting the spikes perfectly level at the back is tricky...."

The back of my SL2s look like this:

Ignore the tiles, these will not be used in final position; just so I can practice on a solid surface.

Is the leaf spring the cross bar across the bottom on which the Tweeter assembly mounting points sit?

Does the back of anyone else's SL2s look different?

This seems to correlate with the picture in the manual:

Bruce Woodhouse posted:

I have never quite understood the HH test re rapping on the boxes and 'the tweeter does not move'. The bottom boxes of mine definitely move if pushed but the tweeter assembly stays the same position-which makes it move relative to the top box aperture until the box stops swaying.

is this is a healthy 'positive HH test'? If not they sound lovely anyway....

Absolutely correct. The speaker moves but the tweeter doesn't, so the tweeter moves relative to the aperture. It's quite hard to explain all this, especially with a frontal lobe brain injury - I confuse even myself!

The leaf spring is underneath the speaker - it is not the bar at the back. When you push the front of the speaker and it moves relative to the base - it's the leaf spring that lets it happen. 

If the idiotic dealer who incorrectly disassembled the speakers is a Naim dealer, they should be paying to have them shipped back to Salisbury to have the base checked. Nobody on here really knows if they are ok or not, though if they pass the rocking back and forth test they should be ok I'd have thought. 

As HH says above, giving the lower box a push moves it back and forth on the rear left spring but gives the optical illusion that it's the tweeter moving - quickly oscillating back and forth through the cut-out. If this doesn't happen, or the oscillation looks weak or "soggy" or the tweeter appears to move around laterally in the cut-out, then there's a problem somewhere.

Hungryhalibut posted:
Bruce Woodhouse posted:

I have never quite understood the HH test re rapping on the boxes and 'the tweeter does not move'. The bottom boxes of mine definitely move if pushed but the tweeter assembly stays the same position-which makes it move relative to the top box aperture until the box stops swaying.

is this is a healthy 'positive HH test'? If not they sound lovely anyway....

Absolutely correct. The speaker moves but the tweeter doesn't, so the tweeter moves relative to the aperture. It's quite hard to explain all this, especially with a frontal lobe brain injury - I confuse even myself!

I think we got there! At least you now have a test named after you.

This thread appears to make SL2s sound like a horror to set up. I found them easier (and better engineered) than my SBLs. Took me 2 hours max to unpack and install carefully. I've also not had to adjust them after day one either. I'd hate this thread to put people off this lovely speaker. Just makes sure it is dis-assembled and packaged correctly by the dealer or previous owner, not completely dismantled!

Bruce

You judge the faff - and there really isn't much of it - by the results. There are very very few speakers that can beat what the SL2 does. The base itself is in several parts with the leaf spring inside, that's why you can't see it.

To get your Sl2s performing anywhere near their best you want them much closer to the wall as HH advises - in many cases the closer the better. Another common mistake is to have them too close together.

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jfritzennonaimnomusic
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