What book are you reading right now?

I picked this up on vacation and read it in 5 days ,  author teaches a Dylan class at Harvard and has thoroughly researched from his classics in Latin and other poets bits and pieces Dylan puts in his songs.  Key to this was Dylan was in Latin club in Hibbing high.  I had an afternoon listing to my CDs of his more recent works.

Kevin-W posted:

Newly-published survey of the history of electronic music; well written, with the author's typically idiosyncratic viewpoint.

It’s had mixed reviews. Would welcome your thoughts. 

I’ve just finished Retromania by Simon Reynolds, which is another side of that particular coin.

Mike, the author is a mate, so I'm a bit biased. I enjoyed it immensely, and the narrative isn't the usual one, and Stubbs, a real enthusiast for the form, makes an eloquent case for underrated acts such as the Young Gods. Retromania is very good and if you liked that, you should like this.

Kevin-W posted:

Mike, the author is a mate, so I'm a bit biased. I enjoyed it immensely, and the narrative isn't the usual one, and Stubbs, a real enthusiast for the form, makes an eloquent case for underrated acts such as the Young Gods. Retromania is very good and if you liked that, you should like this.

Cheers Kevin. Much appreciated. 

James Pogue  -  "Chosen Country: A Rebellion In The West" (2018)  About the 2016 militiamen/rancher/religious fundamentalist (god,guts and guns)  armed take-over of the Malhuer National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Oregon protesting federal land management policies in the Wild West of the 21st century.  

TOBYJUG posted:

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/713jIoMO3UL.jpg

Lets see what all the fuss is about.

I struggled with this and couldn't manage to finish it.

I found the prose a bit turgid sometimes (I know it was written in Hebrew, and translated into English later); and many of the claims in the book dubious and sensationalist (some of the predictions were blood-curdling, and felt like a throwback to Gordon Rattray Taylor's 1960s/70s popular classics The Biological Time Bomb and The Doomsday Book).

While Harari's ideas are quite interesting as and in of themselves, they are luridly expressed and hobbled by a weird kind of political correctness; and there seem to be very few sources for his various assertions.

Kevin-W posted:
TOBYJUG posted:

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/713jIoMO3UL.jpg

Lets see what all the fuss is about.

I struggled with this and couldn't manage to finish it.

I found the prose a bit turgid sometimes (I know it was written in Hebrew, and translated into English later); and many of the claims in the book dubious and sensationalist (some of the predictions were blood-curdling, and felt like a throwback to Gordon Rattray Taylor's 1960s/70s popular classics The Biological Time Bomb and The Doomsday Book).

While Harari's ideas are quite interesting as and in of themselves, they are luridly expressed and hobbled by a weird kind of political correctness; and there seem to be very few sources for his various assertions.

Interesting overview. This book was recommended by a family member who has led quite a considerable life getting to know people.   canvasing for liberals in the fifties. Political aid in the Middle East. Recently as a teacher for English in Italy.   He must have read those unbacked up assertions without source through his own knowledge of them. Bless him.

Arnhem by Anthony Beevor;

So far, about a quarter of the way through,  I'm not sure it adds much to Cornelius Ryan's earlier book on the same subject, A Bridge Too Far.  Beevor's writing style though makes for a relatively easy read. If you read and liked his previous books, you'll doubtless have little resistance to this one. 

The Fighters 

Kevin-W posted:

That book probably won't get a favourable review in the Grauniad, Doug.

It goes without saying, that is, unless they ask someone who is smart, honest, thoughtful and one who has an inquisitive mind such as yours truly to do a review.  

BTW, I haven't noticed any liberal typos yet ;-)

Richard Ford - Independence Day

The second in Ford’s Frank Bascombe trilogy (there’s a volume of shorter stories also). More nuanced than The Sportswriter, in this book the protagonist seems more awkward and less likeable than before. There’s still warmth and humanity, though. I’m not surprised this won a Pulitzer Prize. Highly recommended for lovers of great American fiction.

I've been waiting eagerly for this, the seventh book in the Shardlake series. I was alerted to these superb novels by my next-door neighbour, a professor of history, who was very impressed with the historical accuracy of the stories, as well as the high quality of the writing. All seven books have been of a similar standard, with exciting plots, great characters, and satisfying conclusions. Highly recommended!

tonym posted:

I've been waiting eagerly for this, the seventh book in the Shardlake series. I was alerted to these superb novels by my next-door neighbour, a professor of history, who was very impressed with the historical accuracy of the stories, as well as the high quality of the writing. All seven books have been of a similar standard, with exciting plots, great characters, and satisfying conclusions. Highly recommended!

I’ve just bought my copy today! Also a huge fan.

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