What Comes First Sound Quality or Room Aesthetics?

Just to be clear so everyone understand,I only use the room's regular decor when I work with "Room-Tunning".

I also want it to look like a normal room.

The reason that these acoustic "Soundpanel" was used (see previous post),was that they were available.
In addition,they were small and worked perfectly in the ceiling,..as they were white, they also disappeared against the white roof.

These have also been tested in the corners of the room,but the best result was when they were used in the ceiling.

/Peder 🙂

Fortunately I have my own listening room, I am in the process of sorting out the room acoustics using some GIK panels.

I had an email recently from them to say you can buy now any panel and have it designed with any picture or colour scheme  you want on the front. I’m sure other companies probably do exactly the same...

My conclusion is the panels, bass traps ect work extremely well, and bring the best out of our expensive black boxes....more often than not if their is something amiss with our systems it’s probably the room as opposed to anything else...

If you don’t have your own listening room then try and at least do something to make a difference as others have suggested 

Bert Schurink posted:

I have found a good balance of using room correction which doesn’t intrude. I wouldn’t want to have a living room which looks like a studio just because of the music. This would only be acceptable with a separate listening room. 

I have a dedicated listening room (see photo above) and it looks like a normal living space; rather, nothing like a studio. I think the only possible acoustic treatment I might tolerate is maybe some ceiling panels like Peder describes, if the benefit warrants. But the wall panels and bass traps I have seen look like just as that, and not a natural addition to living space. It doesn't matter if they are stained/painted/decorated to look like art. They aren't. They are still acoustic panels and obviously so. It's just not worth it to me to spoil an enjoyable space with that. I get that others are OK with it and think they look OK. It's not for me. The room aesthetic has to take a reasonable priority, even if the SQ isn't optimal.

Almost all the music I listen to is acoustic jazz and classical. I discern no issues that need room correction and love the sound. Perhaps ignorance is bliss.

RaceTripper posted:
Bert Schurink posted:

I have found a good balance of using room correction which doesn’t intrude. I wouldn’t want to have a living room which looks like a studio just because of the music. This would only be acceptable with a separate listening room. 

I have a dedicated listening room (see photo above) and it looks like a normal living space; rather, nothing like a studio. I think the only possible acoustic treatment I might tolerate is maybe some ceiling panels like Peder describes, if the benefit warrants. But the wall panels and bass traps I have seen look like just as that, and not a natural addition to living space. It doesn't matter if they are stained/painted/decorated to look like art. They aren't. They are still acoustic panels and obviously so. It's just not worth it to me to spoil an enjoyable space with that. I get that others are OK with it and think they look OK. It's not for me. The room aesthetic has to take a reasonable priority, even if the SQ isn't optimal.

Almost all the music I listen to is acoustic jazz and classical. I discern no issues that need room correction and love the sound. Perhaps ignorance is bliss.

Other than that it may be a bit thicker than, say, a typical canvas stretched over a frame, how is an acoustic panel obviously so when faced with a print of any artwork of your choice, from your own photo to a reproduction of an old master?  

Of course, as you say, ignorance may be bliss - or maybe you are lucky, and your room just happens to be near perfect!

Innocent Bystander posted:
 
...
 

Other than that it may be a bit thicker than, say, a typical canvas stretched over a frame, how is an acoustic panel obviously so when faced with a print of any artwork of your choice, from your own photo to a reproduction of an old master?  

Of course, as you say, ignorance may be bliss - or maybe you are lucky, and your room just happens to be near perfect!

I guess I would have to see such a panel, but I haven't yet seen one that didn't just say "faux." I have artist prints. I also have paintings on strecthed canvas (my wife's mother was a well-known local artist). They use very high quality paper/canvas and inks, and look a lot different than cheaper copies you get in a non-art gallery store, etc. I suspect the acoustic panels are going to be closer to the latter than the former. I put real art on my walls, not posters or faux art. I can tell the difference. But it matters to me, and not most I'm sure.

Well, I suspect more people have reproduction artwork than originals on their walls... butbthat’s actually irrelevant, all that matters in this context is thatbteh panels look noce.

GIK is one place that does, so if at all interested you can check out tneir website. I know from inquiring that it can be any i age, so Icould send them photos of my own, or purchase from them, or purchase from any art website and send to them.

Innocent Bystander posted:

Well, I suspect more people have reproduction artwork than originals on their walls... butbthat’s actually irrelevant, all that matters in this context is thatbteh panels look noce.

GIK is one place that does, so if at all interested you can check out tneir website. I know from inquiring that it can be any i age, so Icould send them photos of my own, or purchase from them, or purchase from any art website and send to them.

Yeah, I suppose one could get something there to look decent. I'd like to see one in the flesh. You can't really judge the quality from web site pictures. Nevertheless, the space I have left on my listening room walls is reserved for some more jazz-themed artist prints I've been wanting to hang.

I think you just get used to your own acoustics; as long as it's not echoey then it should be fine.  IME home listening often sounds better than it did at the dealers and I think that's just down to a familiar environment.  A window blind, a rug, light furnishings should be the only additions you may need to make.

I have an 18th century longcase clock in my listening room whose tick you don't notice after a while.  I have turned the strike off though

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