What wine are you drinking today ?

A new one for me - Charles Thomas Cotes Du Rhone.  A friend picked it up for me coming over from France.  Makes change from my usual Guigal. Very nice too.  Not much of a nose to it but surprisingly smooth with a lovely taste of bramble and raspberry.  I'm told the grapes for this wine are organically grown. Crazy value too at under a fiver a bottle.

http://thewinestation.com/1687-849-large/yellow-tail-merlot.jpg

I always try and keep a couple of these in the kitchen cupboard.  The sweetness goes a long way if using less than perfect tinned tomatoes in any dishes when you would use both.  Also great as a chefs little eye opener whilst spending some time over that sauce.  

@Mercky Chateau Lagrange 2012, this evening’s tipple. Opened and decanted at 5pm, glass poured at 6.30, 1st sip at 7.30. Initially a lovely pure blackcurrant nose, slightly muddy coffee tannins on the palate supporting a lovely cassis /black cherry creamy full-mouth flavour, followed by a lovely perfume of blackcurrant lingering in the mouth. After another hour or so the palate cleared to a lovely complex fruit taste with tannin/acid structure, it’s got sweet fruits and rich powerful creamy texture, classy young wine. Now five and a half hours after decanting it’s really lovely, complex fruits, great structure, and hints of development. 3-4 years more will have it showing some more complex secondary flavours, it’s a very good mid-rank claret.

I like the left-Bank Bordeaux 2012s, with good time in decanter they drink nicely now, and will be better in a few years. The better chateaus (most cru classés and others) managed to make good 1st wines despite the impact of the rain on the Cabernet, and they’re sensibly priced compared to the great vintages. 

We just had a fantastic weekend in Serralunga d'Alba, and Alba itself for the truffle festival. Well, you would wouldn't you?

2018 is bucking at least one trend in that it is excellent for the white truffles which are both high quality and plentiful, so cheaper than the last few years (when they have been disappointing), and also it is looking like an excellent vintage. (Unlike France where 18 has been a bit lumpy to say the least). Too early to call absolutely for Barolo, because the Nebbiolo harvest (underway) still has two-three weeks to go, but the forecasts are very positive.

We drank some nice wines!

But, then, we had some nice food:

Had a nice surprise at a work dinner last week.  The host and friend brought some very nice bottles.  The Ornellaia as off the restaurant's wine list so no choice of vintage.  It was way too young as expected and seriously outshone by the other mature bottles.  Of the others, the Monprivato, Corton and Margaux were all exceptional.

 

ekfc63 posted:

Had a nice surprise at a work dinner last week.  The host and friend brought some very nice bottles.  The Ornellaia as off the restaurant's wine list so no choice of vintage.  It was way too young as expected and seriously outshone by the other mature bottles.  Of the others, the Monprivato, Corton and Margaux were all exceptional.

 

This must be a VERY good friend to hoik a Chateau Margaux out of his cellar for you! Have you tried the Beune yet? Drouhin is a good producer but I've always Beaune to be a bit on the thin side when it comes to Burgundy and Pinot Noir is an expensive grape to experiment with (on my finances anyway!). Regrettably I've not had much Barolo - does it need a good cellaring like Chateaneuf or Hermitage? I'm guessing it's a pretty big, inky wine.

Jonners posted:
ekfc63 posted:

Had a nice surprise at a work dinner last week.  The host and friend brought some very nice bottles.  The Ornellaia as off the restaurant's wine list so no choice of vintage.  It was way too young as expected and seriously outshone by the other mature bottles.  Of the others, the Monprivato, Corton and Margaux were all exceptional.

 

This must be a VERY good friend to hoik a Chateau Margaux out of his cellar for you! Have you tried the Beune yet? Drouhin is a good producer but I've always Beaune to be a bit on the thin side when it comes to Burgundy and Pinot Noir is an expensive grape to experiment with (on my finances anyway!). Regrettably I've not had much Barolo - does it need a good cellaring like Chateaneuf or Hermitage? I'm guessing it's a pretty big, inky wine.

The guy who brought the Margaux has 10,000+++ plus bottles in his cellar, no doubt all good bottles.  It was only the second time I'd met him.  I can only assume he drinks well all the time.  Must be nice! 

Barolos tend to need lots of ageing (what fine wine doesn't?).  Having said that, the 2005 we had was drinking beautifully with a short (+-1hr) decant.  I could tell that it could still use more bottle age (or air) since there was still some tightness.

If I had to pick a favourite it'd have to be the Corton.  I'm primarily a Bordeaux, Priorat and Italian drinker, but when you get a really good red Burg it really is quite an experience.  The trouble is the lower priced stuff generally isn't good at all.

 

 

ekfc63 posted

If I had to pick a favourite it'd have to be the Corton.  I'm primarily a Bordeaux, Priorat and Italian drinker, but when you get a really good red Burg it really is quite an experience.  The trouble is the lower priced stuff generally isn't good at all.

 

 

Not the French stuff anyway and the hype around Burgundy doesn't help the price either. As a lover of NZ Sav Blanc I was intrigued with the Pinot Noir coming out of Otago but I've yet to try a single one which can hold a candle to burgundy at any price, so when it comes to NZ I stick to white.

It's a similar thing with Chardonnay - Chablis is so overpriced (IMHO) for what is commonly available the only place I can trust to get a nice bottle is Laithwaite's which is where I get most of my booze from these days. That or Meursault which is definitely a notch about in terms of quality and hasn't been tarnished with the hype brush.

I have had 1 interesting Pinot from Romania, o.k - never going to be up there with the French Premier Cru and Cru Classe's but good throwing wine at a decent price. 

Yes fine wine is so overpriced these days.  In my neck of the woods an entry level Chablis runs UKP20 and a half decent one runs UKP30 and up.  Not everyday drinking money.  Bordeaux I used to buy a few years ago for UKP40 are now being released at 3 - 4 times that.  I guess its just good old supply and demand.   In my experience there's not much worldwide that can give you the same flavor profile as a good Burgundy or Bordeaux.  Drink good stuff but drink less is my MO!

Christopher_M posted:
Jonners posted:
.....the hype around Burgundy doesn't help the price either.

Jonners, Anyone, How would the slightly less monied drinker (say, a supermarket shopper) know which part of the hype was justified?

I know, it is tricky - do you remember the race to see who could the first cases of Beaujolais Noveau into the UK? it was a triumph of marketing. The reason Beajolais was rushed out is because it goes off if it isn't drunk quickly! Fortunately, the French have a classification system for their wines and it is pretty rigid. Study and learn that and trust the label to know what you are buying, that is really the best way. As a rule of thumb good supermarket wines start from about £7.50. The reason is that at least £5 will have been spent on bottling, transportation and import duties. The rest is the actual wine itself and how good can a 2 quid bottle be? Try to stay away from the big brands and avoid labels with lots of medals - they are meaningless unless they have got bronze, silver or gold awards physically stuck on in which case buy with confidence.

Jonners posted:
Christopher_M posted:
Jonners posted:
.....the hype around Burgundy doesn't help the price either.

Jonners, Anyone, How would the slightly less monied drinker (say, a supermarket shopper) know which part of the hype was justified?

I know, it is tricky - do you remember the race to see who could the first cases of Beaujolais Noveau into the UK? it was a triumph of marketing. The reason Beajolais was rushed out is because it goes off if it isn't drunk quickly! Fortunately, the French have a classification system for their wines and it is pretty rigid. Study and learn that and trust the label to know what you are buying, that is really the best way. As a rule of thumb good supermarket wines start from about £7.50. The reason is that at least £5 will have been spent on bottling, transportation and import duties. The rest is the actual wine itself and how good can a 2 quid bottle be? Try to stay away from the big brands and avoid labels with lots of medals - they are meaningless unless they have got bronze, silver or gold awards physically stuck on in which case buy with confidence.

Thanks. I find I'm fine with anything by Jaboulet, Chapoutier, Perrin & Fils etc. when i'm looking for something good.

Christopher_M posted:
Jonners posted:
Christopher_M posted:
Jonners posted:
.....the hype around Burgundy doesn't help the price either.

Jonners, Anyone, How would the slightly less monied drinker (say, a supermarket shopper) know which part of the hype was justified?

I know, it is tricky - do you remember the race to see who could the first cases of Beaujolais Noveau into the UK? it was a triumph of marketing. The reason Beajolais was rushed out is because it goes off if it isn't drunk quickly! Fortunately, the French have a classification system for their wines and it is pretty rigid. Study and learn that and trust the label to know what you are buying, that is really the best way. As a rule of thumb good supermarket wines start from about £7.50. The reason is that at least £5 will have been spent on bottling, transportation and import duties. The rest is the actual wine itself and how good can a 2 quid bottle be? Try to stay away from the big brands and avoid labels with lots of medals - they are meaningless unless they have got bronze, silver or gold awards physically stuck on in which case buy with confidence.

Thanks. I find I'm fine with anything by Jaboulet, Chapoutier, Perrin & Fils etc. when i'm looking for something good.

I apologise if I came across as patronising Christopher, it was not intentional. There is so much snobbery around wine, I was trying to pass on some useful tips. Very sorry.

1998 Vosne-Romanee Les Suchots Domaine Confuron-Coteditot

Hour in decanter, nice nose of red fruits, slightly unfocused. The palate is again lovely, red fruits, strawberries, cherries, raspberry sharpness, good structure, quite rich, but again slightly unfocused, lacks a bit of length, but nice creamy red fruit perfume. I picked up 3 of these a while ago, this is my last, it’s a very nice and good wine, lacks the purity of fruit and concentration of the fine vintages from this maker’s wines from this vineyard, the vintage showing I think, but still a very good bottle of wine, frustrating because it’s so close to being fine, but lacks the purity.

Responding to an earlier comment on this thread, how do you know which Burgundies are worthy of the hype? Incredibly tricky, the vineyards are small and shared between many makers. Although I think the general quality of winemaking has gone up a lot in my 30 years of drinking Burgundy, it’s much rarer to find a maker who makes a genuinely bad wine from a great vineyard, relying on the classification doesn’t work for me. Even within the same rank of vineyards in a village, there is huge variation, compare a Chambolle-Musigny Les Amoureuses with a Les Charmes, the former will be vastly more concentrated and have more lovely flavours. But for me the maker is key in Burgundy, top domaines (and the best merchants) will have great vine keeping and grape picking leading to great fruit, then they’ll vinify well  and make the most of the grapes. It’s now expensive to do it, but for me the answer is to taste a lot of Domaines, work out which ones you like the style of, then check the vintage reports and buy wines in your price range from the makers you like. Most fine Burgundy makers make good wines from the bottom of their range upward, and the style is recognisable through the range, so you can do it by starting with their Bourgogne level wines, but even those tend to be £15+ these days.

 

rodwsmith posted:

And

And

But I have been teaching, honest...

(And the eagle-eyed of you may spot that I have been teaching at the Yacht Club de Monaco - there's posh!!!)

Rod, any wines of note here?  I certainly recognise some of them and many appear to be quite accessible.

Dr Loosen - Erdener Prälat Auslese 1995

When I pulled the Burgundy out of the Eurocave earlier, I had a quick look at the lower section piled with 30 or,so German Rieslings, and noticed this. It’s ridiculously lovely, honeyed sweetness, slate and grapefruit hit you on the nose. The palate follows with honey, grapefruit and tangerine, pineapple and peach, then slate and stone flavours, the perfume in the mouth Is honeyed peach and grapefruit. It’s a glorious wine, power, beautiful fruit and length, all from one glass.

One of the wonderful things about German Riesling is that the residual sugar seems to protect it, so I’ll have had one glass tonight, I’ll stick the cork back in and shove in the fridge, a glass a night during the week will show no deterioration. I hadn’t realised that until I did a tasting evening back in the ‘90s with Ernst Loosen (owner of Dr Loosen who made this wine) he said that and I tried it with much success, as a Riesling like this is 7.5% ABV a small glass is 1 unit, so it works out as.a great way to have a nice dessert for few calories and the booze isn’t bad. (Having once left a tasting evening with Ernie Loosen and his U.K. agent to go to a couple of wine bars and clubs, I’m not totally convinced he ever tried the one glass a day thing himself.)

Richard Dane posted:
rodwsmith posted:

And

And

But I have been teaching, honest...

(And the eagle-eyed of you may spot that I have been teaching at the Yacht Club de Monaco - there's posh!!!)

Rod, any wines of note here?  I certainly recognise some of them and many appear to be quite accessible.

I am mid-teaching a WSET (Wine and Spirit Education Trust) Level 3 Advanced course, during which we taste around 75  different wines (over five days, have now finished days 1 - 3). There is a blind tasting exam as part of it, so we have done a few of those, but other than that last week was all Europe-based, and aimed to cover as much of the geography, styles, production methods and ages as possible.

The stand-outs were, unsurprisingly, the Giscours 2010, the Barolo, both German Rieslings (especially Axel Pauly's Trocken), the Tokaji, the Pfaffl Gruner Veltliner, and the wonderful (albeit pricey) wine from Chêne Bleu. The Larrivet Haut Brion Blanc was 2007, and delicious, but really fully mature. They didn't like it so much, so I got to bring it home. The two Burgundies were both pretty good, (but there are budget limitations) and of the cheapies, the the Sicilian Nero d'Avola from Morgante (less than €5) is delicious, and Campo ai Sassi Rosso di Montalcino is always very dependable (about €14 here).

But no real duffers (apart from one corked).

Kiwi cat posted:

Lovely Otago Pinot Noir. Medium bodied with luscious dark berry fruit and crisp balancing acidity. Still young but opulent and sweet on the palate. And cheaper than a burgundy of similar quality by a factor of 2-3.

Lovely picture KC, and the wine sounds enticing. I’ll have a look and see if any makes it over to this side of the world.

Kiwi cat posted:
Watchet posted:

Musar Jeune; amazing value

It’s amazing how such a wonderful wine can be made in such a troubled region. Long may the Musars keep doing so.

When Serge Hochar was first evangelising the wine around the world, he told the tale of the villagers sheltering in his cellars during one of the bloodier years of the civil war in the ‘80s.

From the NY Times obituary of the legendary Serge Hochar:

“Despite shells falling in vineyards and Israeli tanks appearing at the winery, where the wine cellar doubled as a bomb shelter, Musar missed only one vintage during the war, in 1976, when electricity was out and roads were impassable, Mr. Hochar said.”

Talk about the oenological front line...

Felt like something rich a few days ago. 2000 Rieussec. Deep amber colour, a palate of burnt orange marmalade, dried apricots and dark honey. Not overly sweet, richness nicely counterpoised with gentle acidity. 2 days after opening it I cooked up a pea and bacon risotto. The recipe called for 150ml dry white wine, there was none available so I added the Rieussec, not ideal, but the risotto was none the worse for it! I still have 300ml to go and like Eoinks Grman Loosen wine,the Sauternes can live in the fridge for days without deteriorating. I’ll make sure to have some $10  Sauvignon Blanc on hand when I next make the risotto in the future !

Kiwi cat posted:

I've got a recipe for Moet Champagne on Weetabix. Very good eye opener on a sunday morning.

When visiting relatives in Spain I always visit the small fishing port of Cabo de Palos and join the locals in a breakfast of an Asiatico which is very strong coffee, Licor 43, Spanish Brandy and condensed milk lots of sugar and sugary donuts the clue is not to have a second which can take some will power on my part because after the second a third will followed after which a day of drinking can and has ensued.

Add Reply

Likes (1)
robgr
×
×
×
×